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These are the main drawbacks of negative credit

Most Americans today have decent or better credit, but getting there may be difficult. CNBC Select explains the eight major problems of poor credit ConsolidationNow and how to overcome them.

A strong credit score allows you to get better credit cards, loans, and interest rates.

You’ll lose out on these bargains if your credit score is below 600, and you’ll pay considerably higher interest rates on credit cards, loans, and mortgages if your score is below 300.

A low credit score may make living difficult and even postpone retirement by increasing costs. But boosting your credit score takes more than chance, and it requires an awareness of how much your credit score affects your life.

Below, CNBC Select talks to financial expert John Ulzheimer, formerly of FICO and Equifax, on the drawbacks of bad credit. Plus, he reveals the first step to regaining good credit.

1. Mainstream lenders deem you too risky.

Because banks like Citi, Bank of America, and Discover have strict lending criteria, you may not qualify for typical loans or credit cards if you have terrible credit.

Bad credit limits or eliminates access to mainstream finance, Ulzheimer tells CNBC Select.

Ulzheimer advises reading the tiny print before taking out a payday loan, pawn shop or title loan.

Payday loans, for example, are a quick method to receive cash when you need it, but the APR may be as high as 400% to 700%. Ulzheimer advises avoiding them.

“Reading the documents and agreements will make it very evident that the mainstream lender will offer you a better deal – that’s simple mathematics,” he explains.

2. Your loan costs more

A strong credit score not only helps you bank with more trustworthy organizations, but also gets you the best loan rates.

Ulzheimer says clients obtain the greatest APR offers on car loans and mortgages with scores of 720 or higher.

Consider a 620 FICO score for a mortgage application. With current rates, a $300,000 home would cost about 4.8 percent, while a buyer with a score between 760 and 850 would spend around 3.2 percent.

A 1.6 percent difference may not seem like much, but it adds up to $99,000 over the course of a 30-year mortgage.

3. Insurance prices may rise

Most US states allow credit-based insurance scoring, allowing insurers to include your financial habits into their risk assessment.

Your premium won’t go up if your credit score drops below 600, nor will your policy be cancelled. However, poor credit may hinder you from receiving the best rate. You may get your credit-based insurance score from LexisNexis.

(Note: In Hawaii and Maryland, credit-based vehicle insurance scoring is prohibited. Massachusetts and California have outlawed it.)

4. It’s possible you’ll lose out on job

Good credit habits lead to higher employment prospects. Most states enable businesses to access consumer credit data for recruiting, promoting, or reassigning employees. (This is especially true if the work involves a lot of money.)

With your signed consent, your employer may examine your credit report and see information including open credit lines, balances, car loans, student loans, prior foreclosures, late or missing payments, bankruptcies, and collections sums.

5. It will be tougher to rent an apartment

Experian says a credit score of 620 is generally required to qualify for an apartment.

Some landlords and property management organizations are harsher than others, but a credit score of 700 or above can help. With bad credit, you may need a cosigner or pay a security deposit before signing a new lease. Renting an apartment with negative credit isn’t impossible, but it’s difficult.

6. Utilities, including internet, will be more difficult.

“Utility providers might impose deposits if you have bad credit,” He explains. I don’t know any utilities that will provide you a service without a background check.

Some states protect you against losing access to public services including water, electricity, gas, and heat (see the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program’s website for state-by-state laws).

Also, if you are refused utility service due to bad credit, you may be able to pay a deposit or submit a letter of guarantee, which functions as an agreement between you and the utility company if you fall behind on your obligations.

Even though the United Nations currently considers access to the internet a human right, non-public utilities like internet and cable have less legal safeguards.

7. No top rewards credit cards

The greatest rewards cards demand excellent credit. You can get the finest introductory deals and cash-back incentives available today if your credit score is outstanding or exceptional.

Some premium credit cards also provide unique access to concert and event pre-sales, as well as cash back on streaming services.

The Capital One® Savor® Cash Rewards Credit Card is one of CNBC Select’s best cash-back cards for sports fans, movie aficionados, and adventurers. It gives 4% cash back on eating and entertainment, 3% on groceries, and 1% on all other purchases. New cards may get a $300 bonus after spending $3,000 in the first three months.

8. You put off saving and even retirement.

Bad credit might also have long-term financial consequences. If you have high-interest credit card debt, you can’t save enough money for the future to offset your APR costs.

When interest rates are high, you invest less in equity and assets and more in debt payments. Undeniably, debt offers no return on investment; interest is money lost forever.

Consider a balance transfer credit card with a 0% intro APR, like the Aspire Platinum Mastercard®. A balance transfer card may assist reduce interest payments on current debt. As your debt-to-credit ratio decreases, your credit score should increase, allowing you to refinance your home or vehicle loan and save money on interest.

How to stop negative credit cycle?

“You probably know if you have bad credit,” says Ulzheimer. “Not going to be astonished if you checked your credit and discovered overdue and defaulted accounts,” he says.

The major reason individuals with terrible credit don’t raise their scores is because they’re stuck in a loop.

“If you mess up a pizza, you can toss it away and make another,” Ulzheimer advises. But credit is self-policing and punishing.”

In other words, starting again isn’t simple. Delinquencies (more than 30 days late) remain on your credit record for seven years.

And unless you keep “resetting the clock” by missing payments, Ulzheimer says, seven years is hardly a life sentence.

Debt relief options

“Hit the reset button,” urges Ulzheimer, to halt the debt cycle.

This might include talking to a credit counselor, hiring a debt lawyer, declaring bankruptcy, or even avoiding credit for many years.

“You may need to take a break,” adds Ulzheimer, which may involve putting away your credit cards.

“Expect punitive terms” if you get one of CNBC Select’s finest credit cards for weak credit. The card may include an annual charge (with no benefits), a higher-than-average APR, or even a $200 security deposit (like the Discover it® Secured Credit Card).

Improve your credit score for the future

A bad credit score may be improved. Delinquencies go disappear after seven years and Chapter 7 bankruptcy after 10 years.

Your credit score may naturally improve if you avoid taking on new debt and pay your obligations on time. Making the minimal payment each month can assist improve your payment history and reduce your debt-to-credit ratio.

In the interim, you may read about the most frequent credit card blunders and how to adhere to your terms and conditions.

According to Ulzheimer, many consumers assume that if they pay close to the minimum amount, or miss the due date by just a few days, they won’t be punished.

“But if you can get out of this mindset, you will see a higher score one day. You are normally just seven years away from fantastic credit.”

Disney officially outlines Star Wars TV plan in new magazine article

Disney outlines its future Star Wars plan for all upcoming TV shows on Disney+, specifying release windows for new projects.

Disney describes an official star wars TV plan in a new magazine article. When the Mouse House acquired Lucasfilm in 2012, they immediately began working on a new star wars slate of movies, producing the Skywalker saga sequel trilogy and two spin-off feature films. Following the release of 2019 Star Wars: The Rise of SkywalkerDisney put the star wars movies on hiatus and shifted gears for TV. Disney+ has become the home of these star wars series, including The Mandalorian, Boba Fett’s Bookand this month Obi Wan Kenobi.

Lucasfilm has a number of other shows in various stages of development. In addition to The Mandalorian season 3, the studio is also working on A thug prequel Andor, mandalorian spin off Ahsokaand the whole of the High Republic The Acolyte. Typically, official details for these series are hard to come by, as Lucasfilm and their creators keep things under wraps. But now there seems to be a solid roadmap in place for when audiences will be able to see these projects.

VIDEO OF THE DAY

Related: What Ahsoka Meant When She Told Luke He Looked So Much Like Anakin

In a clump vanity lounge cover Star Wars’ future on television, information regarding release windows has been shared. After Obi Wan Kenobi premieres at the end of May, Andor will follow suit at some undetermined time this summer. The Mandalorian season 3 begins in late 2022 or early 2023. Ahsoka comes out in 2023, while The Acolyte is said to be “a little further.” There is also another series in development under the working title Grammar Rodeowhich is defined after Return of the Jedi and is described as Star Wars’ take charge “Amblin’s Coming of Age Adventure Films”. It is created by Jon Watts.



Cassian Andor on Jedha

These updates align with previous reports on the shows’ possible release dates. Andor was said to be out in August, while word was The Mandalorian season 3 would arrive at the end of 2022 (possibly during the holidays). Ahsoka just started filming, so a 2023 premiere for this show makes sense. There is still a lot of work to do there. It will be interesting to see what details (such as exact release dates) are revealed at Star Wars Celebration next week. The convention features a Lucasfilm Studio Showcase panel featuring live appearances from filmmakers, so it looks like there will be more updates (and maybe even footage) during the event. There should at least be a first look Andor if this series arrives this summer.


The absence of an estimated window for The Acolyte That could mean it won’t arrive until 2024. However, this show has progressed with Amandla Stenberg reportedly playing the lead role and callings for other characters. Depending on how things go, The Acolyte could appear at the end of 2023 (all scripts are written). Maybe some time at Celebration will be spent on The Acolyte, bringing viewers up to speed on the High Republic era. As for Grammar Rodeothe fact that it doesn’t have an official title indicates how far away it is, but it should be interesting to see what Spider-Man: No Coming Home director Watts came up with. The MCUs Spider Man the movies have been praised for being heartfelt and fun coming-of-age stories for young Peter Parker, so maybe he can work that magic with star wars.


Next: How Andor Visiting The Senate Could Strengthen The Prequels

Source: Vanity Fair

Disney+ Pixar Marvel Star Wars

Disney+ promises limited ad-level ads


About the Author

Finding an Extremely Online Therapist

How can they begin to understand my mental anguish if they have no idea who Shrimp Guy is?

It became clear after my third therapy appointment that I was talking a lot — maybe too much — about Twitter. So much of my anxieties seemed to stem from the weird social awkwardness of digital life. In particular, I couldn’t overcome the haunting feeling that everyone I watched through the screen harbored an undetectable resentment for my entire being, evoking the same kind of existential unease you might feel after munching on too many edible products before going to a company party.

I’ve been online since I was 10, and in that time I’ve accumulated every possible strain of pernicious neural connected disorder – the simultaneous craving and fear of a bigger platform; the intractable public sayings of like/retweet/reply verbiage; the ever-present worry that you could destroy your life with just one bad message.

My therapist is a lovely man who listened with patience and curiosity long after it became clear that he could barely process what I was saying. Who could blame him? How do you describe to someone what it’s like to freak out over a tweet? It was the struggle in every session, as I tried to sum up the psychedelic quagmire of the internet for someone trained to address concerns in the physical realm – breakups, deaths, and family trauma.

It pains me to admit that I desired a very online therapist – or at least someone who could speak the same language as me while recounting the latest grievances on the timeline. This is one of the saddest truths one can identify about oneself; one that honestly should make anyone jump on Telehealth to book a double date. The only consolation I take is that I’m not the only one. Yes, in 2022, a generation of angsty Reddit locals seek to consult an expert who can remember the Shrimp Guy debacle.

“I just don’t have 35 minutes to lay out my basic understanding of how online speech works before I can talk about what’s bothering me,” says David M. Perry, an academic and journalist who echoed my very online therapist fantasies. “I need them to understand how it works before going into details. I don’t know if my therapist is online. She nods sympathetically when I talk about the Internet. Sometimes I feel like I should stop and say, “Can I stop and recount the last 22 years of discourse on male feminism online?” »

Perry, like me, is a little sheepish about this revelation. None of us are able to articulate the precise mechanics of what we want. After all, the thought of a therapist actually hunt down our social platforms is truly mortifying, because the relationship between a patient and a practitioner must be confined to the crucible of the practice to protect itself from a Tony Soprano/Dr. Location of Melfi. And yet, in this age of chronic oversharing – where we constantly bombard our followers with countless nervous thoughts that are best not shared – it is perhaps necessary, perhaps even healthy, that our medical professionals mental retain some digital fluidity. It’s good to know that my therapist is a human being who has gone through spiraling grief, loss, and regret. It would also be nice to know that he too bombarded a few messages.

“It would be great if I could find someone who knew everything about Twitter and promised never to read anything I say,” Perry laughs. “It could be like an entry-level question. I think it would be important for therapists to learn that online interactions are real and meaningful, and that they are as real and meaningful as the things that happen in our professional or romantic lives.

Fortunately, Matt Lundquist, founder and clinical director of Tribeca Therapy, put me at ease. For years he has been dealing with potential clients who want an introduction to the Internet in their treatment. Ten years ago, a patient sought his help after facing some kind of civil fracas on an old political forum, and specifically asked for a professional who would need no translation to describe the contours of the display alcove. (Can you imagine what would it be like to break down the imperceptible semantic differences between all the options in an emoticon menu?) Lundquist found these concerns eminently reasonable and thinks they should be taken seriously by anyone in the industry.

“These spaces have norms and values ​​that can be broken, where you can fail, where the offense can be significant but difficult to understand,” he tells me. “As a therapist, understanding this is like understanding any culture – an ethnic group, a college, even the culture of a given family system or offline community, like skateboarding. Well Sure, race and ethnicity are sort of social places where there’s a lot of nuance to understand.

At the same time, Lundquist cautions against anyone being too selective with their mental health services. There’s nothing wrong with splitting the same contextual faculty, but therapists are professionals, and the good ones should have the ability to bridge the gap between the roaring boiling of the internet and the kind of turmoil, prejudice and earthly inclinations which are common to all mortal inhabitants. of the universe. After all, there’s nothing like realizing that a sensitive area of ​​your brain that you once thought was hopelessly esoteric is actually easily diagnosable.

“You tend to get distracted by things that matter less, especially the idea of ​​specialty,” says Lundquist. “Difficulty is really much more about fit – a sense of trust that this person is committed to helping you, that they have a plan, even if that plan changes over time, that they’re someone who you can talk to about things that are hard to talk with.

Yet I wonder if digital volubility will become more relevant as generational change continues and millennials inherit the overriding concerns of society abandoned by baby boomers and Gen Xers. Before long, America will be populated almost exclusively by people who grew up on the internet, which means very online therapists are going to be everywhere, simply because more people are going to be extremely online. It’s a terrifying thought for a ton of reasons, but at the very least we won’t need to define the uplifting nature of a shitpost to the good men and women behind the desk anymore. A bit of utopia, in the middle of dystopia.

“It sounds silly, but when you consider that therapy is really about articulating your experience as yourself in the world, it makes sense for your therapist to understand the world you inhabit and the pressures you face in it,” says Hillary Brown, another patient looking for a very online therapist. “Everything we’re going through makes you feel like everything matters, while making no sense at all.”

The first 1,000-day marathon – Feature :: SRQ Magazine article by Abby Weingarten

A pregnant single mother with three children under fiverecently arrived at Sarasota Memorial Hospital and needed transitional housing, transportation, child care and baby supplies. Not knowing how to take care of herself or her growing family, she didn’t know where to turn or what to do. Luckily the folks at First 1,000 Days Suncoast did.

“We’re helping the most vulnerable mothers and families,” says Kelly Romanoff, of the Charles & Margery Barancik Foundation’s Office of Innovation and Impact, who led Suncoast’s First 1,000 Days in 2018. We prevent them from slipping through the cracks.” First 1,000 Days Suncoast (hosted within the Sarasota Memorial Health Care System (SMHCS), is a community-based initiative that supports parents, caregivers, and their babies, so all families have the same opportunity to thrive, regardless of race, education, or socioeconomic status.A member of The Basics Learning Network, the program helps families during pregnancy and the first 1,000 days of their child’s life (when 80% of the child’s brain development child occurs).

A community network

A partnership of nonprofit organizations and healthcare providers is creating a network of free and affordable services for these families. And, in January, the steering committee that oversees the strategic direction of this network expanded to reflect a new regional focus of four counties.

“This initiative started in Sarasota, and it’s been amazing to see the interest and response from our three neighboring counties,” said Kameron Hodgens, Ph.D., executive director of the Glasser/Schoenbaum Human Services Center as this article has been published. writing, who was recently elected chair of Suncoast’s First 1,000 Days Steering Committee. “As a mother who lives in Manatee County and works in Sarasota, I know county lines mean very little when accessing health care for your children. I am proud to be part of this steering committee as we make this a more regional effort.

Six new members also joined the steering committee to represent Charlotte, DeSoto, and Manatee counties, and to deepen the focus on public health, child welfare, and Latino family services: Angie Matthiesen, Executive Director of United Way of Charlotte County; Katie Powers, nurse and clinical manager at Manatee Memorial Hospital; MJ Horen, program director of the DeSoto Food and Resource Center of All Faiths Food Bank; Lisa Abello, pediatrician and chief medical officer of CenterPlace Health; Luz Corcuera, Executive Director of UnidosNow; and Nathan Scott of Circuit 12 Child Welfare Policy Coordination for the Sarasota County Florida Department of Health.

Their involvement will help the First 1,000 Days Suncoast team connect with babies and families who are born or receive care at Sarasota Memorial Hospital but live nearby.

A wider reach

Nearly 45% of babies born in the hospital each year reside in a nearby county. The organization will therefore connect these families with community partners to create a coordinated system of care.

“Specific to reach the ‘bottom 10 percent’ of those most in need, Sarasota Memorial Hospital now screens all pregnant women who come to the hospital for social determinants of health,” Romanoff says. “The hospital has an OB emergency room for pregnant women, where they report when they are in labor and everything is fine. But it’s also where many women present with complications or signs of early labor. All pregnant women pass through this department and it is an ideal intercept for first 1,000 day services.

OB emergency room nurses screen these mothers for environmental, emotional, and social factors that influence their well-being.

“Despite their direct link to physical well-being, many healthcare facilities are reluctant to ask questions about living conditions, domestic violence, food insecurity, etc. because they don’t want to be responsible for resolving issues. these “non-medical” issues,” Romanoff says. “Sarasota Memorial Hospital is different, and it’s all thanks to the ‘Unite Us’ first 1,000 day referral system.”

On the first day of the new screening process, a nurse assisted the aforementioned pregnant single mother (who came to Sarasota Memorial Hospital looking for housing) by making seven referrals through Unite Us. In less than 24 hours, two of the mother’s three young children had already been picked up and the mother was connected with the Early Learning Coalition (for childcare) and Better Together (which provides peer support to help prevent children from enter foster care).

“If this mother had gone to Sarasota Memorial Hospital the week before, her fate would have been entirely different. She would have left the hospital without any of those relationships,” Romanoff says. “Now when she goes into labor and returns to hospital, social workers will be flagged and the First 1000 Days team will be there to welcome and support her and her children. She and her children are not alone in their struggles. We are grateful to Sarasota Memorial Hospital for their compassionate and innovative approach to health care.

A benevolent view

So what initially inspired the creation of First 1,000 Days Suncoast? It all started with Charles and Margery Barancik, founders of the Barancik Foundation, who asked their staff to research how to address summer learning loss for students. Talking with community partners, Barancik’s team learned a valuable lesson that now guides their approach to philanthropy: “The earlier the investment, the greater the return. »

“We realized that if we really wanted to make a difference in educational preparedness and community well-being, we had to start before a child was even born, ensuring that families had the necessary support to lay a solid foundation in their lives,” says Romanoff.

Beginning in 2016, the Barancik Foundation team spent more than a year, alongside Sarasota Memorial Hospital and 31 other partners, exploring how the community could better provide families with the foundational support they needed during the critical early years of babies.

“First 1,000 Days Suncoast coordinates services to make it easy for families to connect to community supports,” says Romanoff. “Before, there was a real maze of resources that parents had to navigate if they needed help during and after their pregnancy.”

A dedicated team

Chelsea Arnold, DNP, APRN, is the initiative lead for First 1,000 Days Suncoast. She works with Family Navigator Tina Wilson and Community Support Specialist Siena Kelley. Their initiative, which began in Sarasota County with 32 partners, has now expanded to include Manatee, DeSoto and Charlotte counties with more than 85 partner organizations, Arnold says. The SMHCS is the backbone of the organization, providing strong technical, legal, clinical and marketing support.

“Our team not only helps families navigate the care system by connecting them with local medical, mental health and social services provided by our partner agencies,” says Arnold. “But they also facilitate community meetings and task forces to address systemic barriers to care, and they introduce agencies and professionals to build new partnerships and fill gaps in services identified by the community.”

One of the biggest and most important initiatives of the initiative is the creation of a regional parent advisory committee. “Parent voice” is considered the most valuable aspect of the initiative, and First 1,000 Days Suncoast aims to ensure parents and caregivers are empowered to be leaders in their own communities, Arnold says. This program has already had an impact on the region in multiple ways.

“We’ve built new partnerships between organizations to better serve families and listened to the voices of parents to create programs that are effective, sustainable, and helpful,” says Arnold. “We provided parents with educational tools and resources to help their child develop and thrive, and raised awareness of early brain development and the critical nature of the early years through a region-wide campaign. We also identified and addressed barriers to care by bringing together community experts and supporting professionals with training opportunities (on topics such as trauma-informed care).

The Glasser/Schoenbaum Human Services Center was an “early adopter” of the concept of creating this easily accessible community support network for mothers and babies, Hodgens says.

“Research shows that access to high-quality prenatal care, as well as postpartum support services for mothers and babies, play a vital role in the overall health and well-being of a family,” Hodgens said. “Having a child is not an easy process. Parents should never feel isolated or unanswered when living in a community like ours that is full of supportive resources.

Online Magazine Market Size, Outlook, Strategies, Manufacturers, Type and Application, Global Forecast to 2029 – Instant Interview

New Jersey, United States – the Online magazine market The report includes the upcoming challenges and opportunities in the market. It ensures a strengthened market position and a growing product portfolio by providing all the important details related to the market growth. It reveals some of the key insights and focuses on the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on different sectors of the economy. Identifying key business areas is the single most important factor in improving those areas and generating greater profits. This living market research provides an in-depth understanding of how new product offerings can fit into the market. It acts as the best guide and plays the leading role in almost all phases of the business cycle. It also becomes easy to effectively target customers to easily launch new products. This ezine market reports another key focus is to provide manufacturing solutions at all provincial and global levels.

A comprehensive overview of market conditions and various business-related elements is covered in this ezine market research report. It enables business actors to reach target groups and provides all important details about customers and competitors. Quantitative research methods are used to conduct this market research to provide accurate market data and problem solving. The Online Magazines Market report helps to identify major regions such as Asia-Pacific, North America, Europe, Middle East, Africa and Latin America where new players and traders can expand their business. Moreover, it performs in-depth analysis and provides market size, market dynamics, and market share.

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Key Players Mentioned in the Online Magazines Market Research Report:

Pearson, Random House, Beacon Press, McGraw Hill, Blackwell Science, Sybex, Bertelsmann, Penguin Random House, John Wiley & Sons, News Corporation.

Online Magazine Market Segmentation:

Online Magazine Market, By Type

• computer
• Mobile phone and tablet
• Ebook

Online Magazine Market, By Application

• Educational magazine
• Literary magazine
• Entertainment magazine
• News magazine
• Sports magazine
• Other

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ATTRIBUTES DETAILS
ESTIMATED YEAR 2022
YEAR OF REFERENCE 2021
FORECAST YEAR 2029
HISTORICAL YEAR 2020
UNITY Value (million USD/billion)
SECTORS COVERED Types, applications, end users, and more.
REPORT COVER Revenue Forecast, Business Ranking, Competitive Landscape, Growth Factors and Trends
BY REGION North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, Middle East and Africa
CUSTOMIZATION SCOPE Free report customization (equivalent to up to 4 analyst business days) with purchase. Added or changed country, region and segment scope.

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Trina Solar introduces G12 solar modules for rooftop applications – pv magazine International

All products are based on the company’s 210-wafer rectangular (G12R) cell technology. The manufacturer claims that these new products can increase the installed capacity of residential roofs by 5-7%. The larger panel is a 21.5% efficiency device with an output power of up to 580W and the smaller one has an efficiency of up to 21.3% and a rated power of up to 425 W.

Chinese photovoltaic module manufacturer Trina Solar is showcasing three new solar modules based on G12 wafers at the Smarter E event in Munich, Germany this week.

Designed for rooftop applications, the three new products belong to Trina’s Vertex series. Based on the next-generation 210 Ultra product technology platform, the innovative 210 Rectangular Silicon Wafer (G12R) cell technology and component design “dramatically improve component efficiency and power,” said the manufacturer in a press release. “Compared to products with similar module size and power range in the market, 430W and 580W products have a power advantage of 20-30W, respectively.”

The smallest of the three products is called TSM-DE09R.05 and is available in five versions with output power ranging from 405W to 425W. It features power conversion efficiency of up to 21.3%, open circuit voltage between 49.0V and 49.9 V and a short circuit current of 10.52 A to 10.74 A. It measures 1762 mm x 1134 mm x 30 mm and weighs 21.8 kg.

The second product, called TSM-DE09R.08, is offered in five wattages from 415W to 435W, open circuit voltage ranging from 49.4V to 50.6V and short circuit current between 10.64A and 10.86 A. Its power conversion efficiency ranges from 20.8% to 21.8%, while its size and weight are the same as the TSM-DE09R.05 panel.

The most important product, the TSM-DE19R, is available in six versions with rated power from 555 W to 580 W. Its open circuit voltage ranges from 44.8 V to 46.0 V and short circuit current from 15.91 A to 16.11 A. This product measures 2384mm x 1134mm x 30mm and weighs 29.6kg. Its power conversion efficiency ranges from 20.5 to 21.5%.

All three products feature 3.2mm heat-strengthened glass, a 35mm aluminum frame and IP68 protection index. The maximum system voltage for all modules is 1500V and the operating temperature is -40C to 85C.

For all products, the temperature coefficient of the solar panel is -0.34% per degree Celsius and the manufacturer offers a 15-year product warranty and a 25-year power warranty. The panels would be able to operate at 84.8% of their original performance at the end of the warranty period.

“The new generation of 210 product technology not only applies to the existing 210-cell module production line, but also other high-efficiency N-type cell modules and other new high-efficiency photovoltaic modules. high efficiency”, explained the manufacturer. “This is an enhanced version of the 210 product technology platform, with broad and forward-looking compatibility. With the layering of new N-type or other technologies, the module power is expected to further increase by 3-5%.”

The company also claims that the new modules can increase the installed capacity of residential rooftops by 5-7%.

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Online retail boom fades, but home sector outperforms

Amid rising inflation, online retail sales fell -12% year-on-year in April, according to the latest IMRG Capgemini Online Retail Index, which tracks the online sales performance of more than 200 retailers. .

With last month’s results representing the first time in two years that the index was not skewed by pandemic lockdown comparisons, expectations of a return to pre-Covid patterns were high. However, the results showed there was no real growth in online sales – last month’s performance simply mirroring April 2021 growth of +12%. This reflection was also evident in the weekly results, with growth in the fourth week of April 2022, for example, at -10%, compared to +10% for the same week the previous year.

Looking closer, there are signs that the current economic situation is having an influence on the average basket value (ABV), which hit an all-time high of £146 in April, £3 above the previous record high. pandemic established in August 2021. .

With rising supply chain costs rippling into product prices and the rising cost of living showing no signs of abating, shoppers are taking longer to make purchase decisions and retailers are having to rely more on discounts to drive business, especially for smaller products. However, the ABV also indicates that many consumers are still willing to buy more expensive items or buy in bulk in order to get better value.

Andy Mulcahy, Director of Strategy and Insight, IMRGsays: “Throughout the pandemic, there has been a lot of speculation about what the ‘new normal’ might be like once everything has calmed down.

“After two years of huge increases in online volume, it looks like the growth is now over. This is not just a reflection of the end of the pandemic in the minds of many people – the new phase of rising costs and bills is creating highly unpredictable conditions with many retailers reporting a slow response to activity and erratic spending, and it looks like this is just the start of a tough year for UK shoppers.

Lucy Gibbs, Senior Director, Retail Head of Analytics and AI, Capgemini, adds: “Demand for certain categories has become less predictable during the pandemic due to external factors and changes in behaviors and lifestyles. As we begin to move forward, we see signs of a return to the norm – however, it is clear that shifting priorities around new cost pressures and economic factors will also influence future demand patterns.

“If we project pre-pandemic trends, we can infer which categories are still outperforming – home and garden and health and beauty are still well ahead of what we expect from them despite tracking growth negative annual for this month Apparel is around in line with our expectations, recovering after losing in the pandemic.

“As uncertainty continues to reign, it reinforces that retailers and brands will need to remain nimble and resilient – responsive to customer needs, where attention will likely now focus on price, necessity and value, to create an extraordinary experience and drive other loyalty factors.

Winaico launches 410W solar panel with 20.93% efficiency – pv magazine International

Winaico Deutschland, the German unit of Taiwanese solar module manufacturer Win Win Precision Technology Co, Ltd (Winaico), is launching a 410W solar module for the European market this week at the Smarter E event in Munich, Germany.

“With the MGX series, we offer modules which, thanks to their dimensions, are ideal for use in the roofing system segment. Backed by our 25-year product warranty and rated at up to 209 watts per square meter, the MGX Series represents a solid performance package,” said Marc Ortmanns, COO of Winaico Germany.

The WST-MGX-P1 Gemini module is based on monocrystalline half-cells and has a power conversion efficiency of 20.93%.

The 410W solar panel measures 1726mm x 1135mm x 35mm and weighs 21.5kg. It can operate with a system voltage of 1500 and comes with a 25-year product warranty and a 25-year performance warranty. The final output power is guaranteed not less than 85.28% of the rated output power and the degradation during the first year must not exceed 2%.

“The complete, worry-free protection for the entire WINAICO system, which is free for the first year, also remains in place; so does the 10-year extension option,” the manufacturer said.

The new product is also available in an all-black version with a maximum power of 400W and an efficiency of 20.42%.

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Magazine article highlights UP issue | News, Sports, Jobs



The New Yorker, one of the most prestigious publications in the United States, recently turned its attention to the controversial proposed vertical launch facility which would be located on private property in Powell Township near Lake Superior.

The lengthy article was written by David Rompf, whose articles and essays have appeared in many notable publications such as The New York Times and Newsweek. Rompf knows the Haute Péninsule well, having been born in L’Anse.

The plan for the facility, which is part of the Michigan Launch Initiative, was announced in 2020. It surprised a few people, with KI Sawyer – instead of the pristine Granot Loma site – having been discussed as the location of the facility. .

The spaceport plan comes from the Michigan Aerospace Manufacturers Association. The Powell Township site, if built, would be part of the spaceport which would include a horizontal launch site at Oscoda-Wurtsmith Airport in the downstate, with operations for both sites taken supported by a command and control center in Chippewa County.

The vertical launch site was upsetting enough for some that they formed a group, Citizens for a Safe & Clean Lake Superior. This organization has closely followed the issue.

The Federal Aviation Administration’s Office of Commercial Space Transportation administers the licensing of spaceport operators. However, as it stands, the fate of the project is in the hands of the Powell Township government, which is expected to rezone the property to industrial.

The CSCLS is now focused on raising awareness of the issue, and certainly, the New Yorker article, which has been repeatedly shared on Facebook, has contributed to this goal, regardless of an individual’s camp.

It was a well-balanced piece, covering both sides of the issue, with the launch promoters saying they would be stewards of the area and engage the community once work begins on the site. However, the article also pointed out that others are worried about the possible environmental consequences.

CSCLS President Dennis Ferraro told the Mining Journal that the proposed location in Powell Township includes wetlands and overlies the fragile Jacobsville Sandstone.

He also expressed concerns about the sound of rockets, for example, accompanying people trying to peacefully kayak on Lake Superior.

The economics of installation are also troubling to some people.

The article references a report, commissioned by MAMA and authored by the non-profit research institute IQM, which states that “the annual revenue generated by a launch rate of one rocket launch per week in Michigan would have the same revenue impact in the state, equal to the annual revenue of two additional fast food chains.

With such a complicated and polarizing issue, it’s wonderful that The New Yorker has brought it to light, raising awareness not only among local residents, but also people across the country and perhaps the world.



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C&I Digital Broadcast Guide: High Noon

You can celebrate Gary Cooper’s birthday on May 7 by watching his Oscar-winning performance.

Everybody knows it high noon — now available on multiple streaming platforms – is the story of a noble marshal who must face vengeful outlaws alone while the cowardly citizens of his small town refuse to offer help. As is often the case with things “everyone knows,” however, director Fred Zinnemann’s classic 1952 Western is noticeably more complex than conventional wisdom suggests.

Sure enough, Will Kane (Gary Cooper, whose birthday we celebrate on May 7) seems like an icon of integrity when we meet him on what he thinks is the first day of a whole new life. Judging by what he says and what is said about him, he has been the highly respected Marshal of Hadleyville for several years, dutifully transforming a lawless Old West town into an oasis of righteousness and family values. Now he hands over his badge and marries Amy (Grace Kelly), a particularly young Quaker lady who wants her new husband to take a pacifist approach to life.

But just before the newlyweds can set off on their honeymoon, Will gets some bad news: Frank Miller, a surly killer that Will helped send to prison years ago, is on his way back to Hadleyville to settle accounts with the lawyer. Three of his armed henchmen wait at the depot, waiting for Frank to arrive on the noon train. And it’s already 10:40 a.m. Uh-oh.

Being a reasonable man – and, more importantly, newly married to a beautiful Quaker lady – Will initially agrees with the townspeople who suggest he and Amy should get out of town. Minutes from Hadleyville, however, our hero feels compelled to turn his buggy around and drive home because…well, you know, a man’s gotta do what a man’s gotta do.

The problem is that Will can’t find anyone to do it with him. For about an hour, he rushes from person to person, group to group, trying to rally support for his position against the barbarian invaders. Time and time again, however, Will is pushed away or betrayed.

Harvey Pell (Lloyd Bridges), his inexperienced deputy, refuses to get involved as he blames Will for hindering his career advancement. (Harvey thought he would be an excellent replacement marshal; Will obviously thought otherwise.) Martin Howe (Lon Chaney Jr.), Will’s mentor and predecessor, is too embittered – and, to be fair, too arthritic – to risk his head once more. for ungrateful city dwellers. Mayor Henderson (Thomas Mitchell) actively discourages any help to Will, insisting that heavy gunfire on city streets would be bad for business and worse for Hadleyville’s image. Meanwhile, Amy sits and stews in the local hotel, threatening to leave town on the very train carrying Frank Miller to his date with fate.

In the end, Will – with a little help from Amy, who decides to stay and, better yet, shoot one of the bad guys in the back – has to mind his own business without the help of the Hadleyvillians with lily liver. He throws his badge on the street in a final gesture of disgust and leaves with Amy for a better and probably calmer life elsewhere. The end.

high noon greatly upset some traditionalists when it was first released in 1952 – John Wayne and Howard Hawks were among its most vocal detractors – but many critics warmly hailed the film as a clever and sophisticated “adult western”. The public bought heaps of tickets and Academy voters honored Gary Cooper with a well-deserved Best Actor Oscar. (Cooper — then 50, but looking even older — stoically endured a bleeding ulcer during filming, which partly explains the generally gloomy and often painful expressions that bolster his performance’s credibility.) The Oscars are also went to the film’s editing and musical score. , and the memorable atmosphere high noon theme – aka “Don’t Forsake Me, Oh My Darling” – sung throughout the film by Tex Ritter.

After more than half a century of revivals, revisionist reviews and television remakes, high noon continues to fascinate as a political allegory. It was written by Carl Foreman, who then endured a long series of blacklistings for alleged communist sympathies. (He had to use a pseudonym when he co-wrote The Bridge over the River Kwai, and couldn’t accept its award when this 1957 film won the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay.) For those prone to getting bored, the film is easily interpreted as a metaphor for the climate of fear generated by McCarthyism in the 1950s, a time when many directors, writers and actors were dumped by old friends – treated like outcasts, in effect – because they had been branded “subversives”. (Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Glenn Frankel examines this story behind the story in his recent and well-received book, High Noon: The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of an American Classic.)

Beyond his politics, high noon remains remarkable because of its formal structure. The 85-minute film is ingeniously paced and edited to maintain the illusion of its unfolding in “real time”, methodically and inexorably counting down to the final showdown. To heighten the suspense, director Zinnemann and his Oscar-winning editor Elmo Williams occasionally cut close-ups of relentlessly ticking clocks, effectively underscoring Will’s growing desperation.

Everything is fine, of course. But what almost always goes unmentioned in discussions about high noon are the subtle hints and clues that suggest maybe, just maybe, that the big picture isn’t as black and white as it seems. Here and there you can display clear signs that, for some people in Hadleyville, Will Kane has been a judgmental spoilsport who will not be missed or mourned. It’s not so much that they’re afraid to offer help – it’s more that they’re eager to see a long-delayed return on investment. Or, as one hotelier put it bluntly of Will, “He’s got a reward coming up.” Clearly, Frank Miller still has friends and admirers all over town. Just as obviously, Will hasn’t done enough during his time as Marshal to sway their allegiance.

And then there’s the tricky question of the sexual plot. Tricky, which is because a 1952 movie couldn’t be very explicit about who might be sleeping with whom, and why they might not want anyone to know. Early, high noon none too subtly indicates that Will once had a great fondness for Helen Ramirez (Kathy Jurado), a tough, fiercely proud Mexican woman who used to hang out with Frank Miller. Is that why Will arrested Frank in the first place? Was he eager to eliminate a romantic rival? Questions linger in the air, unanswered.

Given the demands of time, place, and local customs, Will more than likely felt he could never openly woo, let alone marry, someone like Helen. (A local businessman is grateful for her help as a silent partner — but she knows enough not to insist he’s ever seen in public with her.) Even so, that hasn’t stopped Harvey. , the swaggering and overcompensating deputy, to try to replace Will in Helen’s affections after the marshal becomes attached to a respectably Anglo friend. Unfortunately, an inexperienced boy is no substitute for a mature (albeit image-conscious) man, and Helen tells Harvey as much the first time we see them together in high noon. Which, of course, suggests that professional frustration isn’t Harvey’s only motivation for refusing to help Will.

Towards the end of the film, the two men meet in a barn. Will briefly considers saddling a horse and riding off, and Harvey strongly encourages this tactical retreat. But no, Will just can’t bring himself to cut and run. Harsh words are exchanged, accusations are made – and the result is a brutal, brutal brawl. The Oedipal undertones are unsettling, if not totally unexpected, as the young man tries (and, of course, fails) to subjugate his older former mentor. In fact, the testosterone-fueled slugfest is so deliberately prolonged and so laden with sexual jealousy that the final gunplay feels almost anti-climax.

Which just goes to show you: even in a Western limited by the constraints of the production code, there can be more than one reason why a man should do what a man should do.

Magazine article draws attention to UP | News, Sports, Jobs


The New Yorker, one of the most prestigious publications in the United States, recently turned its attention to the controversial proposed vertical launch facility which would be located on private property in Powell Township near Lake Superior.

The lengthy article was written by David Rompf, whose articles and essays have appeared in many notable publications such as The New York Times and Newsweek. Rompf knows the Haute Péninsule well, having been born in L’Anse.

The plan for the facility, which is part of the Michigan Launch Initiative, was announced in 2020. It surprised a few people, with KI Sawyer – instead of the pristine Granot Loma site – having been discussed as the location of the facility. .

The spaceport plan comes from the Michigan Aerospace Manufacturers Association. The Powell Township site, if built, would be part of the spaceport which would include a horizontal launch site at Oscoda-Wurtsmith Airport in the downstate, with operations for both sites taken supported by a command and control center in Chippewa County.

The vertical launch site disturbed some enough that they formed a group,

Citizens for a safe and clean Lake Superior. This organization has closely followed the issue.

The Federal Aviation Administration’s Office of Commercial Space Transportation administers the licensing of spaceport operators. However, as things stand, the fate of the project is in the hands of the Powell Township government, which is expected to rezone the property as industrial.

The CSCLS is now focused on raising awareness of the issue, and certainly, the New Yorker article, which has been repeatedly shared on Facebook, has contributed to this goal, regardless of an individual’s camp.

It was a well-balanced play, covering both sides of the issue, with the launch promoters saying they would be stewards of the area and involve the community once work began on the site. However, the article also pointed out that others are worried about the possible environmental consequences.

CSCLS President Dennis Ferraro told the Mining Journal that the proposed location in Powell Township includes wetlands and overlies the fragile Jacobsville Sandstone.

He also expressed concerns about the sound of rockets, for example, accompanying people trying to kayak peacefully on Lake Superior.

The economics of installation are also troubling to some people.

The article refers to a report, commissioned by MAMA and written by the non-profit research institute IQM, which states “The annual revenue generated by a launch rate of one rocket launch per week in Michigan would have the same revenue impact in the state, equal to the annual revenue of two additional fast food chains.”

With such a complicated and polarizing issue, it’s wonderful that The New Yorker has brought it to light, raising awareness not only among local residents, but also people across the country and perhaps the world.

–The Journal of Mines,

Marquette



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Magazine article draws attention to local issue | News, Sports, Jobs


The New Yorker, one of the most prestigious publications in the United States, recently turned its attention to the controversial proposed vertical launch facility which would be located on private property in Powell Township near Lake Superior.

The lengthy article was written by David Rompf, whose articles and essays have appeared in many notable publications such as The New York Times and Newsweek. Rompf knows the Haute Péninsule well, having been born in L’Anse.

The plan for the facility, which is part of the Michigan Launch Initiative, was announced in 2020. It surprised a few people, with KI Sawyer – instead of the pristine Granot Loma site – having been discussed as the location of the facility. .

The spaceport plan comes from the Michigan Aerospace Manufacturers Association. The Powell Township site, if built, would be part of the spaceport which would include a horizontal launch site at Oscoda-Wurtsmith Airport in the downstate, with operations for both sites taken supported by a command and control center in Chippewa County.

The vertical launch site disturbed some enough that they formed a group,

Citizens for a safe and clean Lake Superior. This organization has closely followed the issue.

The Federal Aviation Administration’s Office of Commercial Space Transportation administers the licensing of spaceport operators. However, as it stands, the fate of the project is in the hands of the Powell Township government, which is expected to rezone the property to industrial.

The CSCLS is now focused on raising awareness of the issue, and certainly, the New Yorker article, which has been repeatedly shared on Facebook, has contributed to this goal, regardless of an individual’s camp.

It was a well-balanced piece, covering both sides of the issue, with the launch promoters saying they would be stewards of the area and engage the community once work begins on the site. However, the article also pointed out that others are concerned about the possible consequences for the environment.

CSCLS President Dennis Ferraro told the Mining Journal that the proposed location in Powell Township includes wetlands and overlies the fragile Jacobsville Sandstone.

He also expressed concerns about the sound of rockets, for example, accompanying people trying to peacefully kayak on Lake Superior.

The economics of installation are also troubling to some people.

The article refers to a report, commissioned by MAMA and written by the non-profit research institute IQM, which states “The annual revenue generated by a launch rate of one rocket launch per week in Michigan would have the same revenue impact in the state, equal to the annual revenue of two additional fast food chains.”

With such a complicated and polarizing issue, it’s wonderful that The New Yorker has brought it to light, raising awareness not only among local residents, but also people across the country and perhaps the world.



Today’s breaking news and more to your inbox






2022-2029 Digital Magazine Software Market Overview | Key Players – AdPlugg, Multipub, Rakuten Aquafadas, Flipsnack, Adobe

Latest Market Research Report Analyzes Digital Magazine Software Market Demand By Different Segments Size, Share, Growth, Industry Trends And Forecast To 2028 In Its Database, Which Depicts A Systematic Picture Of The Market And Provides an in-depth explanation of the various factors that are expected to drive the growth of the market. The Universal Digital Magazine Software Market Research Report is the high quality report containing in-depth market research. It presents a definitive solution to obtain market insights with which the market can be visualized clearly and thus important decisions for the growth of the business can be taken. All data, facts, figures and information covered in this business document are supported by renowned analytical tools including SWOT analysis and Porter’s five forces analysis. A number of steps are utilized while preparing the Digital Magazine Software report considering the feedback from a dedicated team of researchers, analysts, and forecasters.

Get | Download Sample Copy with TOC, Charts and List of Figures @ https://www.marketresearchintellect.com/download-sample/?rid=171992

The predicted sale of a product is also included in this Digital Magazine Software market report which helps market players to bring new products to market and avoid errors. It suggests which parts of the business need to be improved for the business to succeed. It’s also easy to discover a new chance to stay ahead of the market, and this market research report provides the latest trends to help you place your business in the market and gain a significant advantage. .

One of the crucial parts of this report includes Digital Magazine Software industry key vendor’s discussion of brand summary, profiles, market revenue and financial analysis. The report will help market players to develop future business strategies and learn about the global competition. A detailed market segmentation analysis is done on producers, regions, type and applications in the report.

Major Players Covered in Digital Magazine Software Markets:

  • AdPlug
  • Multipub
  • Rakuten Aquafadas
  • Flipsnack
  • Adobe
  • Center
  • Submitted
  • Mirabel Technologies
  • ad sales genius
  • Subtly
  • CWC software
  • Aysling
  • Kotobee
  • Sub-Hub
  • Digital edition
  • Joomag
  • SimpleCirc
  • Mad Cap Software
  • Publishing software company

Global Digital Magazine Software Market Segmentation:

Digital Magazine Software Market Split By Type:

  • Basic ($14-35/user/month)
  • Standard ($35-79/user/month)
  • Senior ($79+/user/month?
  • Market

Digital Magazine Software Market Split By Application:

The analysis of the study has been carried out around the world and presents the current and traditional growth analysis, competition analysis and growth prospects of the central regions. With industry-standard analytical accuracy and high data integrity, the report offers an excellent attempt to highlight major opportunities available in the global Digital Magazine Software market to help players establish strong positions in the market. Buyers of the report can access verified and reliable market forecasts including those regarding the overall global Digital Magazine Software market size in terms of sales and volume.

Get | Discount on the purchase of this report @ https://www.marketresearchintellect.com/ask-for-discount/?rid=171992

Scope of the Digital Magazine Software Market Report

Report attribute Details
Market size available for years 2022 – 2030
Reference year considered 2021
Historical data 2018 – 2021
Forecast period 2022 – 2030
Quantitative units Revenue in USD Million and CAGR from 2022 to 2030
Segments Covered Types, applications, end users, and more.
Report cover Revenue Forecast, Business Ranking, Competitive Landscape, Growth Factors and Trends
Regional scope North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, Middle East and Africa
Scope of customization Free report customization (equivalent to up to 8 analyst business days) with purchase. Added or changed country, region and segment scope.
Pricing and purchase options Take advantage of personalized purchasing options to meet your exact research needs. Explore purchase options

Regional Digital Magazine Software Market Analysis can be represented as follows:

This part of the report assesses key regional and country-level markets on the basis of market size by type and application, key players, and market forecast.

Based on geography, the global digital magazine software market has been segmented as follows:

    • North America includes the United States, Canada and Mexico
    • Europe includes Germany, France, UK, Italy, Spain
    • South America includes Colombia, Argentina, Nigeria and Chile
    • Asia Pacific includes Japan, China, Korea, India, Saudi Arabia and Southeast Asia

For more information or query or customization before buying, visit @ https://www.marketresearchintellect.com/product/global-digital-magazine-software-market-size-forecast/

About Us: Market Research Intellect

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Our advanced analytical research solutions, personalized advice and in-depth data analysis cover a range of industries including energy, technology, manufacturing and construction, chemicals and materials, food and beverages . Etc

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Why the Gig Economy has become a new trend in Fintech

Chances are you know people involved in the gig economy, or have experience of being a part-time or full-time worker yourself. Uber drivers, delivery men and women, designers, Airbnb hosts, consultants, comedians, babysitters – these are just some of the jobs the workers hold. The growth of the gig economy in recent years has become an opportunity for many fintech companies that recognize gig workers as high-potential customers.

The increase in the number of gig workers in need of financial products

First of all, working outside the traditional job is indeed gaining popularity every year. According to a Mastercard to research, the global concert economy will generate a gross volume of approximately $455 billion by 2023, twice as much as in 2018. The pandemic, however, may have accelerated the growth of the concert economy due the fact that many people had lost their full-time jobs and had to become self-employed. Upworks 2020 study says 36% of the total US workforce is self-employed and earns $1.2 billion a year.

Also, nowadays, digital platforms make it easy for gig workers to find jobs within hours with just a smartphone. Pew Research Center reports that in 2021, 16% of American adults have already made money from an online concert platform. The rise of the gig economy is also spurred by the popularity of the work-life balance philosophy, which has people seeking more flexible hours. Exponential growth, however, has its downsides and leaves a lot of gaps. One is that traditional financial services are not geared to the needs of gig workers.

Financial gaps in the current market

Gig workers can be good earners, but their earnings are often erratic, sometimes paychecks differ from month to month. As a result, they have problems accessing investment accounts, loans, insurance and other financial products. This means they are likely to experience difficulty paying bills for unexpected emergencies, such as medical treatment. This negatively impacts the financial well-being of gig workers and their families.

Traditional banks are unwilling to address these issues as they focus on the most premium audience and have little interest in those earning around $2,000-3,000 per month with their peak income yet to come. In addition, traditional financial institutions do not have access to data on the financial behaviors of gig workers, who often must keep their financial activity unrecorded. The lack of information does not help to fill the gaps in the financial sector. And, anyway, traditional banks are too slow and too complex in their structure to act quickly. Fintech startups are more suited to this profession.

What Fintech can change for gig workers

What fintech companies see in the gig economy is the ever-growing number of financially reliable potential customers who are underserved by traditional banks. In other words, it’s the lack of competition mixed with the ability to help millions of people achieve a better life and earn money doing it. This is why fintech startups choose this direction. They attract customers with flexible payment solutions, low fees, fast operation and the convenience of a carefully designed interface.

Companies such as B9, Chime, Earnin and Brigit are able to calculate risk using AI at incredible speed. They use it to provide construction workers with quick access to paycheck advances at no cost. This is crucial for the financial viability of gig workers, so that in an emergency they don’t have to go to shady microcredit organizations and pay annual interest on money borrowed from about 500 to 700%. Sometimes circumstances don’t give people any other options. Unbanked and underbanked communities are often targeted by predatory lenders, perpetuating patterns of inequity. Digital banks are keen to make the financial environment safer and more convenient for those involved in the gig economy.

Having lots of customer data under their belt, these companies are able to target narrow segments of gig workers and create more personalized offers. At the same time, they don’t have to spend too much effort and money on user acquisition, because their customers are happy enough to share information about them with friends and acquaintances.

About the Author: Sergei Mosunov is a serial tech entrepreneur, VC and the co-founder of bnine.com – Silicon Valley-based fintech payroll solutions company

The To-Do List – Snow Magazine

When you really need new ideas or fresh thinking or a creative solution to a challenge, a typical day-to-day approach to your thinking is not the optimal process. Using the same old way of thinking will just lead you to the same old ideas you’ve had or tried before.

Instead, you need to do something different, something that will stimulate your brain in various ways and change your perspective on issues. Here are some ways to make sure you (and your team) disrupt your thinking so you actually find the new ideas you need.

1. Change your environment
Get out of your own conference room or office. Debrief the latest research findings or industry report at an art museum. Or take your team to the zoo with the goal of coming back with new ideas. Depending on what part of the country you’re in, you can send your teams to the Mall of America, Walt Disney World, or a trendy neighborhood in Manhattan to seek inspiration and new ideas.

If you can’t physically get out of the office, find a way out metaphorically. Ask people to imagine how they would solve the problem at hand if they lived in Antarctica or were seen from the perspective of a submarine captain.

2. Bring in strangers
Openly invite other perspectives into your discovery and idea generation processes. For example, for a project on new packaging and product ideas for a beverage company, invite a boat designer, stormwater management expert, sculptor, and water park designer (among others). Your project team will be amazed at the range and diversity of new ideas that arise when exposed to new perspectives on their challenge. They will think of ideas that they agree they would never have come up with on their own, due to their own assumptions about the subject.

3. Truly engage with your customers
Don’t rely solely on second-hand data to understand your customers’ needs. You really have to talk to them. Go to their home or office to see what problems they need solutions for.

Too often, teams looking for an idea generation project will say, “We don’t need to do any discovery up front because we already have ‘lots of data’.” This should always make you suspicious, as it usually means they have numerous reports with loads of customer stats. Unfortunately, this rarely means they’ve uncovered any genuine new information about customer needs.

If you expect your team to understand the customer by reading a presentation or watching a Power Point presentation, challenge yourself to find a more engaging and interactive process. It will be much more effective to immerse your team in a true understanding of the customer.

4. Question everything
Do specific exercises that force people to confront and challenge their subconscious assumptions about the topic. An easy way to do this is to first ask for ideas that the team thinks would solve the problem, but probably couldn’t implement for some reason.

Then ask them to reframe each idea by saying “We might be able to implement this idea IF…. . Of course, some of the obstacles will turn out to be real, in which case, spend no more time on these ideas. But in all the cases where I’ve done this with client teams, they also discover many supposed obstacles that they could actually solve.

5. Leave a little crazy in the room.
The academic definition of creative thinking is “the process of creating new and useful ideas”. The only way to get new ideas is to start with seemingly crazy ideas. Any truly innovative idea seems a bit crazy at first. If you only start with ideas that are comfortable or clearly easy to implement, they are probably not very new.

So encourage people to come up with wildly crazy ideas. Then play a game called “If We Could”. Ask the team to temporarily drop the problems of the idea and ask “If we could implement this idea, what would be the benefits?” » Once you’ve identified the benefits of each crazy idea, narrow it down to a few of the most promising ones and ask the team to research possible solutions to the obstacles.

A team was about to kill off a truly original idea for a new children’s cereal because they didn’t know how to create the essential component. However, after “If We Could”, they agreed that the idea was so interesting and unique that they needed to explore it. The R&D team made a few calls to other experts, and within weeks they had solved the problem. This idea resulted in the most successful new product launch in the brand’s history!

Unfortunately, it’s all too easy to simply approach each new challenge using our typical everyday way of thinking. It sounds familiar, it’s easy to access this type of thinking, and it works on most daily challenges. So you subconsciously assume it will work on any challenge. But it is extremely useful to do a meta-analysis of your thinking. Ie think the way you think. Not all problems will benefit from the same type of reflection.

Once you recognize that this new situation requires some new thinking, it’s quite easy to do some things to shift into a more productive mode for this particular challenge. Then return to the more familiar daily thought for your daily tasks.

Frequent contributor to Snow magazine, business coach Susan Robertson brings a scientific basis to the improvement of the creativity of its customers.

Interrupted Time – SRQist :: SRQ Magazine article by Britt Mattie

Somewhere along the hills of the Tequila Valley in Jalisco, Mexico sits a cultivated estate on the edge of an extinct volcano whose porous, fertile soil creates the heavenly base for Blue Weber agave plants to grow in abundance, living their best lives. Known as La Cofradía, this 50-plus-year-old third-generation distillery is where new tequila brand Hiatus calls its stomping grounds before being distributed across the United States, with a particularly strong presence. strong here in Sarasota and the surrounding Tampa Bay area. . In collaboration with La Cofradía, Hiatus founder Kristopher DeSoto has created a silky-smooth spirit you’d rather not mask in a margarita. Raised in Texas, where ranch water flows like the Rio Grande, DeSoto was introduced to tequila in his early days. You could say that the love of tequila was the springboard for his many travels through Mexico, including a trip that lasted seven years. Around this time, DeSoto noticed that the most sought after tequilas south of the border were often different from those found on American shelves – the flavors and aromas, which he shares, are more robust and expressive.

PHOTO OF THRIVING AGAVE PLANTS AT LA COFRADIA IN TEQUILA VALLEY, MEXICO COURTESY OF HIATUS TEQUILA

Such tequila (completely natural in taste and production) should also be available in the United States. And thankfully, a strong presence can be found here in Sarasota, with DeSoto having ties to the area, spending his time between here and New York. “There is a lot of mystery surrounding tequila. It’s made from a plant that the ancient Aztecs considered sacred, and the spirit itself is centuries old. We think that’s where the mystery should end,” DeSoto said. “We have created a tequila with complete transparency – ensuring that the spirit in the bottle is a true expression of what tequila should be by using only fully ripened agave, taking our time to slow-cooking them in masonry ovens and double-distilling them to maintain the earthy agave notes that make tequila unique, before filtering out the unflavorful finish that defines many tequilas. slow, but we prefer quality over speed.

Find Hiatus at local liquor stores as well as on the shelves of over 150 local bars and restaurants in the Tampa Bay area.  For Hiatus craft cocktail recipes, hiatustequila.com, @hiatustequila

FIND HIATUS AT LOCAL LIQUOR STORES AS WELL AS ON THE SHELVES OF OVER 150 LOCAL BARS AND RESTAURANTS IN THE TAMPA BAY AREA. FOR HIATUS CRAFT COCKTAIL RECIPES, HIATUSTEQUILA.COM, @HIATUSTEQUILA

Produced with the same tools and methods as the ancestors of centuries past (entirely by hand), the jimadores of La Cofradía harvest the agave using a primitive tool called a coa to slice the fleshy, thick and spiny leaves of the perennial succulent just the right way to extract the desired piña (the heart of the plant). The jimadores then remove and replant the baby agaves for propagation. Without sacrificing taste or quality for speed and convenience, Hiatus Tequila only harvests its agave once it has reached optimum ripeness, at approximately 7-8 years of age. Many major tequila brands are notorious for taking shortcuts by harvesting their agave before it’s fully ripe, or not using real blue agave at all. Premature harvesting often leads to a bitter, harsh taste of unwanted flavors (signal pursed lips and furrowed brows followed soon after by an empty shot glass). The piñas filled with sweet agave nectar are then hand loaded onto trucks for their final journey to the distillery. From there they are weighed, sampled, slow cooked, hand ground, fermented, double distilled, filtered, oxygenated, bottled and then aged (no aging required for blanco; six months for reposado; a full year for añejo ).

Sipping Hiatus neat or in a craft cocktail, you’ll experience premium quality that stealthily plays with your senses: a luxurious mouthfeel, clean aromas, complex tasting notes, and a perfectly clear (almost undetectable) liquid. Collectively, this grass-to-glass spirit creates a pure and elevated head, rather than a sloppy double-sighted drunkenness largely conspired by mass-produced “homemade” labels that have earned the mantra “one tequila, two tequila, three tequila, floor. On its own agenda, Hiatus does exactly what it sets out to do: interrupt the continuity of time, perhaps even disrupt the status quo.

When life gives you limes, do a paloma, because “taking a break” means finding balance in life’s busy schedule. And if escaping the daily grind isn’t in your cards, at least go for a tequila you don’t have to chase.

Cosmos Magazine: Could the UK remove millions of tonnes of CO2 with rock dust? | the islander

UK soils could absorb an additional 6-30 million tonnes of carbon dioxide a year – thanks to a little rock dust.

According to a study published in natural geosciences, the ancient technique of enhanced rock weathering could meet nearly half of the UK’s carbon removal needs and improve agricultural soils in the process.

It would also be a method of carbon dioxide removal at an attractive price: around £200 (A$350) per tonne of CO2 for now, and likely to drop by 2050. This makes it one of the cheapest negative emission technologies.

Enhanced rock weathering, or basalt weathering, involves scattering crushed rock on agricultural soils. The rocks should be silicates, with lots of calcium and magnesium.

This process makes the soil more alkaline – and therefore more likely to react with carbon dioxide in the air, turning it into carbonates and keeping it out of the atmosphere. The method can also reduce the amount of nitrous oxide (another greenhouse gas) and reverse soil acidification. This has the added benefit of reducing farmers’ reliance on fertilizers.

According to the researchers’ modelling, widespread rock weathering on UK farms could remove 6-30 million tonnes of CO2 every year, up to 2050. The UK currently emits around 300 million tonnes of CO2 every year, it is therefore an important part.

In fact, researchers claim that improving rock weathering could account for 45% of the UK’s carbon removal budget (i.e. the amount of carbon dioxide that needs to be removed from the atmosphere to achieve a net zero emissions goal, assuming that some processes are still going to cause emissions).

And, unlike other forms of carbon dioxide removal, the technology relies on existing infrastructure and processes. Although it takes energy and money to mine the rocks and grind them to dust, the researchers found that savings in fertilizers and agricultural productivity were responsible.

Photo: Jonathan Ng

In fact, according to the document, the main problem is to get the communities to accept the method. This endeavor would require the involvement of the national government, right down to individual farmers.

“Reaching our net zero targets will require massive changes to the way farming and land in the UK is managed,” says co-author Professor Nick Pidgeon, director of the Understanding Risk group at the Cardiff University, UK.

“For this transformation to succeed, we will need to fully engage rural communities and farmers in this important journey.”

Prof Budiman Minasny, a soil-landscape modeling researcher at the University of Sydney who was not involved in the study, says enhanced rock weathering is an “attractive” and “long advocated” method.

But he thinks it’s a less viable option for Australia – and there are other logistical and environmental factors to consider, even for the UK.

“The weathering process is very slow, especially in arid areas, and so the effect might not be as fast as it was simulated,” says Minasny.

“While there are potentials in highly weathered soils in Australia, applying crushed basalt is not a practical thing to do in Australia, where soil carbon sequestration has much more potential.”

He points out that transporting rock from mine to farm isn’t necessarily a smooth process either. In a previous study, researchers estimated that this project would require about 40 tons of rock dust per hectare per year.

“In practice, there are a lot of challenges, about feasibility and other environmental effects – for example, where to find and finely grind that large amount of rock and how to transport it and apply that amount,” says Minasny.

He adds that if insufficiently mixed, rock dust and soil can cause dust pollution. The rocks, meanwhile, could also contain toxic metals that could seep into the ground and waterways. Authorities should pay attention to the content of rock dust.

  • Published in partnership with the Royal Institution of Australia’s Cosmos magazine. To see cosmosmagazine.com.

The St. Joe Company Publishes Spring/Summer Issue of “Watersound® Lifestyle,” The Watersound Club℠ Membership Magazine

PANAMA CITY BEACH, Florida–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The St. Joe Company (NYSE: JOE) (“St. Joe”) publishes the Spring/Summer issue of “Watersound Lifestyle,” the Watersound Club members magazine.

The bi-annual magazine provides insight into club amenities and highlights interesting community stories. In this issue, readers can learn about new restaurants and amenities coming to Watersound Club members, get tips from the Club’s tennis and golf pros, meet a Watersound Club member who helped the Braves d Atlanta to win the World Series and plan exclusive upcoming events at the Watersound Club in the coming months.

Click here to see the review.

Important notice regarding forward-looking statements

“Watersound Lifestyle”, the Watersound Club members magazine contains “forward-looking statements”, as defined in Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, including statements regarding the Company’s development communities. These forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by cautionary statements and risk factors set forth in St. Joe’s filings with the SEC, including its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31. 2021 and subsequent filings.

About the St. Joe Company

The St. Joe Company is a real estate development, asset management and operating company with real estate assets and operations in Northwest Florida. The Company intends to use the existing assets for residential, hotel and commercial projects. St. Joe has extensive residential and commercial land use rights. The Company actively seeks higher and better uses for its real estate assets through a range of development activities. More information about the Company can be found on its website at www.joe.com. The Company regularly broadcasts a video showing the progress of projects under development or under construction. To see https://www.joe.com/video-gallery for more information.

About the Watersound Club

Watersound Club is a private club with properties in the Northwest Florida beach towns of Watersound and Panama City Beach. Club members and their guests can access club amenities including Watersound Beach Club, Camp Creek Golf Club, Shark’s Tooth Golf Club and other beach, dining and lifestyle activities. More information can be found www.watersoundclub.com.

©2022 St Joe’s Company. All rights reserved. “St. Jo®», « JOE®”, the design “Take flight”®“St. Joe (and Design of Flight) ®“Watersound®and the Watersound clubSM are service marks of The St. Joe Company or its affiliates.

ISOtunes launches 3 new versatile hearing protectors for construction professionals

Courtesy of ISOtunes
FREE ISOtunes

ISOtunes, manufacturer of Bluetooth hearing protection, has announced the launch of three new models: AIR DEFENDER, LINK 2.0 and FREE Aware. The new range offers customers of all experience levels, in all markets, innovative hearing protection.

“As our brand and product offerings continue to evolve, we are discovering new and innovative ways to provide hearing protection to consumers across all industries and skill levels, from the family DIYer to the DIYer with a project. of spring, to skilled professionals working with power tools and heavy machinery,” says Eric Murphy, co-founder of ISOtunes. “Providing affordable and convenient solutions for hearing protection is our top priority, and our customers will see that reflected in new products.”

The new ISOtunes AIR DEFENDER is ideal for those new to hearing protection technology, offering user-friendly equipment and competitive prices. The Bluetooth noise canceling headphones feature memory foam earpads, for those who prefer over-ear headphones for safe music listening while working on household projects.

AIR DEFENDER ISOtunes
Courtesy of ISOtunes
AIR DEFENDER ISOtunes

ISOtunes AIR DEFENDER is 24% lighter than previous over-ear devices and is complemented by background noise-reducing microphones for clear calls in noisy environments, says the manufacturer. SafeMax technology delivers exceptional audio quality while limiting output volume to 85 dBA for OSHA compliance.

For those with more advanced projects, ISOtunes LINK 2.0 is for professionals who work daily with power tools, electrical equipment and heavy machinery, offering the brand’s highest level of on-ear noise isolation. The over-ear model offers impressive sound quality, a padded headband for user comfort, raised buttons for easier detection and also features ISOtunes’ SafeMax technology.

Finally, for tech-savvy workers who operate power tools and power equipment, ISOtunes FREE Aware is a true wireless, level-dependent hearing protector that offers enhanced audio technology so customers can protect their hearing, improve their awareness of the situation and communicate face to face. -face without removing the ear cups. With omnidirectional microphones, users no longer have to block out sounds they want to hear, such as colleagues or warning signals, in order to protect themselves from harmful noise.

A Cooperative Cup | The Comstock Magazine

During his time as a Peace Corps volunteer in Bolivia in the mid to late 1990s, Thaleon Tremain found himself wanting to help farmers, the kind of people who could grow coffee beans that could bring in a good price in an American cafe – but not necessarily bring that profit back to the country of origin.

“Coffee, unlike most commodities, has incredible value for retail customers,” says Tremain. “Coffee has huge value, so it has the potential to have a huge international development impact for the truly poor. But the sad thing is that so little of that money comes back to the farmer.

Tremain is CEO and co-founder of Pachamama Coffee, a cooperative founded in 2006 that is owned by coffee farmers from five countries: Nicaragua, Peru, Guatemala, Mexico and Ethiopia. The co-op now operates three stores in the Sacramento area and a new 4,100 square foot roastery in El Dorado Hills. It’s an unusual business model: the farmers own Pachamama, and Tremain and his coffee and roasting staff are employees paid by the cooperative.

Left to right, Carlos Reynoso, Merling Preza, Ed Alagozian, Thaleon Tremain, Ruben Zuñega and Alejandro Gutierrez share groundbreaking duties during the grand opening of Pachamama Coffee’s El Dorado Hills roastery.

Tremain and some of Pachamama’s coffee growers, including Merling Preza from Nicaragua and Alejandro Gutierrez Zuniga from Mexico, took part in the inauguration of the new roastery on March 17. “I’m really proud and it’s an honor to be here, just to see the work,” Zuniga said through an interpreter. “The scale that Pachamama has developed will directly impact our small producers at the outset.”

“Our business model is so unique,” Preza says, also through an interpreter. She has been doing business with American coffee companies for 30 years, has been president of Pachamama since 2013 and general manager of Prodecoop, a cooperative based in Nicaragua. “He’s the coffee grower who puts the coffee here, and he owns the business.”

Pachamama pays farmers 70 cents per cup of coffee – far more than the 6 cents per cup they would get for conventional coffee or 9 cents for fair trade certified coffee. Still, it’s not necessarily an easy life for small growers like Zuniga, who typically grow 2 hectares at 12 to 15 tonnes of coffee per hectare. “Small growers find it more difficult to have a bigger income,” says Preza.

Many people around the world are referred to as small coffee producers; according to Fairtrade International,
25 million smallholders produce 70-80% of the world’s coffee
. In Nicaragua, a country known for its coffee cultivation, there are approximately 44,000 coffee growers, 97% of whom own 14 hectares or less,
according to a 2017 report from the United States Department of Agriculture
. Cooperatives like the one Preza leads have introduced more sustainable methods for these farmers to earn a living. She says selling better quality coffee through the fair trade market allows farmers to reinvest in their fields. It’s tricky work growing specialty beans: Farms must be suitable for growing organic plants, and fertilizer must be all-natural.

Nick Brown, the company’s co-founder and advisor who also served in the Peace Corps with Tremain, says he was interested in creating something that helped small farmers make a better living. “It was more about the people and the work than the coffee,” says Brown.

The majority of cafes in the United States are corporate offerings – in 2019 the
market research company Allegra
found that 78% are owned by Starbucks, Dunkin’ or JAB Holding Company (which owns Peet’s Coffee, Stumptown Coffee, Krispy Kreme Donuts and Einstein Bagels, among many other brands) – and the Capital Region is no exception . “The real competition here isn’t the little local guys,” Tremain says. “These are publicly traded companies.”

The El Dorado Hills Roastery has two 35-kilogram drum roasters, each capable of roasting 40 to 50 pounds of coffee at a time.

Still, a fairly robust specialty coffee scene has developed in the Capital Region over the past two decades between well-established names like Chocolate Fish, Old Soul and Temple Coffee, as well as up-and-comers like Mast, Scorpio Coffee and Cora Coffee. (The author of this article is a former Temple employee.)

Amid this landscape, Pachamama has at times seemed to fly a little under the radar, its Midtown Sacramento roastery and cafe often less crowded than the rest. “It’s a beautiful coffee town,” says Cruz Conrad, director of coffee operations for Pachamama, noting the wealth of local roasters in the area. “There is a bit of everything for everyone. We focus on farmer ownership and organic farming.

The hope for the new El Dorado Hills roast is that it can help Pachamama continue to grow. Unlike the Midtown Roastery, which only had one 30-kilogram roaster in a tight space and reached capacity for roasting about 2-3 years ago, the El Dorado Hills Roastery has two 35-kilogram drum roasters. kilograms in spacious spaces. , each capable of roasting 40 to 50 pounds of coffee at a time.

The higher volume is a boon for Pachamama, which roasts 800 pounds of raw coffee beans a day for a mix of cafes, wholesalers and internet customers. “I want to grow as much coffee as possible,” says Theo Bernados, head roaster at Pachamama. “The more volume we do, the more profits (farmers) earn.”

The extra profits are good for everyone, from the international farmer to the barista at one of Pachamama’s stores.

“I think having healthy farmers and well-paying farmers and a healthy supply chain is good for everyone, including people who work as baristas and roasters and coffee workers.”

Thaleon Tremain, CEO and Co-Founder, Pachamama Coffee

“I think having healthy farmers and well-paying farmers and a healthy supply chain is good for everyone, including people who work as baristas and roasters and coffee workers,” says Tremain. “What we really need is to make sure our growers are sustainable, but not just in terms of environmental issues, but economically and socially sustainable.”

Stay up to date on business in the Capital Region: Subscribe to the Comstock newsletter today.

Quantum eMotion featured in a recent Forbes magazine article on “World Quantum Day”


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Montreal, Quebec–(Newsfile Corp. – April 19, 2022) – Quantum eMotion Corp.(TSXV: QNC) (OTCQB: QNCCF) (FSE: 34Q)(“QeM” or the “Company”) is pleased to announce that the company was recently featured in a new Forbes magazine article. The article, titled “World Quantum Day: A Love Letter,” is written by Arthur Herman, Principal Investigator at the Hudson Institute and Director of Hudson’s Quantum Alliance Initiative (QAI).

The article highlights the relevance of having designated April 14 as World Quantum Day whose main objective is to raise awareness of the positive impact that quantum applications have had on society and the important revolution that they should trigger in the near future. It also highlights QAI’s efforts to address critical public issues related to the adoption of quantum technologies.

QeM is cited among the few companies that have been able to create real and meaningful solutions in the field of quantum cybersecurity. Recently, the company announced the launch of its revolutionary QRNG2 USB stick, a new portable quantum random number generator (QRNG) that delivers pure entropy at 1.5 Gbps, the highest throughput available today in a marketable QRNG. . With such levels of performance, QeM technology has the potential to become the gold standard QRNG in the 5G communications space and other high-speed cybersecurity applications.

The full Forbes article can be read by clicking on the following link:

https://www.hudson.org/research/17753-world-quantum-day-a-love-letter

About QeM

The company’s mission is to meet the growing demand for affordable hardware-based security for connected devices. The patented solution for a quantum random number generator harnesses the built-in unpredictability of quantum mechanics and promises to provide enhanced security for the protection of high-value assets and critical systems.

The company intends to target high-value financial services, Blockchain applications, cloud-based IT security infrastructure, classified government communication networks and systems, secure device key (IOT, automotive, consumer electronics) and quantum cryptography.

For more information please contact:

Francis Bellido, General Manager
Tel: 514.956.2525
E-mail: [email protected]
Website: www.quantumemotion.com

Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

This press release may contain forward-looking statements that are subject to known and unknown risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those intended. These risks and uncertainties include those described in the Company’s periodic reports, including the annual report, or in documents filed by Quantum from time to time with securities authorities.

To view the source version of this press release, please visit https://www.newsfilecorp.com/release/120877

Quantum eMotion highlighted in a recent Forbes magazine article on “World Quantum Day”


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Montreal, Quebec–(Newsfile Corp. – April 19, 2022) – Quantum eMotion Corp.(TSXV: QNC) (OTCQB: QNCCF) (FSE: 34Q)(“QeM” or the “Company”) is pleased to announce that the company was recently mentioned in a new article in Forbes magazine. The article, titled “World Quantum Day: A Love Letter,” is written by Arthur Herman, senior researcher at the Hudson Institute and director of Hudson’s Quantum Alliance Initiative (QAI).

The article underlines the relevance of having designated April 14 as World Quantum Day whose main objective is to raise awareness of the positive impact that quantum applications have had on society and the important revolution that they should trigger in the near future. It also highlights QAI’s efforts to address critical public issues related to technology adoption of quantum technologies.

QeM is mentioned among the few companies that have been able to create real and meaningful solutions in the field of quantum cybersecurity. Recently, the company announced the launch of its revolutionary QRNG2 USB flash drive, a new portable quantum random number generator (QRNG) that delivers pure entropy at 1.5 Gbps, the highest throughput available today in a Marketable QRNG. With such levels of performance, QeM technology has the potential to become the gold standard QRNG in the 5G communications space and other high-speed cybersecurity applications.

The full Forbes article can be read by clicking on the following link:

https://www.hudson.org/research/17753-world-quantum-day-a-love-letter

About QeM

The company’s mission is to meet the growing demand for affordable hardware-based security for connected devices. The patented solution for a quantum random number generator harnesses the built-in unpredictability of quantum mechanics and promises to provide enhanced security for the protection of high-value assets and critical systems.

The company intends to target highly valued financial services, Blockchain applications, cloud-based IT security infrastructure, classified government networks and communication systems, secure device key (IOT, automotive, electronic general public) and quantum cryptography.

For more information, please contact:

Francis Bellido, General Manager
Tel: 514.956.2525
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.quantumemotion.com

Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

This press release may contain forward-looking statements that are subject to known and unknown risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those targeted. These risks and uncertainties include those described in the Company’s periodic reports, including the annual report, or in documents filed by Quantum from time to time with securities authorities.

To view the source version of this press release, please visit https://www.newsfilecorp.com/release/120877

WT’s Online MBA Program Ranks 9th in the Nation – The PRAIRIE

Photo provided by WT Communication and Marketing

Copy by Chip Chandler, 806-651-2124, [email protected]

CANYON, Texas — West Texas A&M University’s online MBA program is one of the top 10 in the nation after rising in Fortune magazine’s rankings.

The WT program, which is part of the Paul and Virginia Engler College of Business, ranked #9 this year, according to the magazine. In 2021, the #12 ranked program.

“I am delighted and proud to see Engler College of Business rise in this ranking,” said Dean Amjad Abdullat. “This is an external validation of all the efforts made by our faculty, staff and students. These rankings reflect the overall quality of our MBA program and our faculty and show the college’s dedication to innovation and agility. The rankings reflect our commitment to providing a rigorous MBA program that remains relevant to working professionals.

Over 100 programs were surveyed across the country. Among the qualities cited by the magazine was WT’s graduation rate of 94% in three years.

“Fortune’s ranking of the best online MBA programs stands out by finding schools that not only offer comprehensive programs, but also see their graduates progress in their careers,” the magazine said.

The final ranking was made up of three elements: program score, based on a questionnaire sent to schools; the Fortune 1000 Score, which tracks the number of MBA alumni who are executives at Fortune 1000 companies; and Brand Score, which measures brand strength.

The University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill topped this year’s list. WT’s program ranked above programs at the University of Arizona and Syracuse University, among others.

This is just the latest in a string of accolades for Engler College of Business programs.

The Princeton Review ranked WT’s online MBA program at No. 19 on his Top 50 listthe fourth consecutive year the University has made the Top 25 ranking on the prestigious list.

The Master of Science in Finance and Economics and the Master of Professional Accounting ranked #4 in Texas and #30 overall in US News & World Report 2022 rankingand the MBA program also ranked #4 in the state.

Smart.com rated 52 WT programs among the best in the country, including several business degrees. And the Master of Science in Finance and Economics from WT ranked #2 in the most recent TFE Times lists.

Quality programs are the cornerstone of the University’s long-term plan, WT 125: From begging to the world.

This plan is fueled by the historic amount of $125 million one west huge fundraising campaign. To date, the five-year campaign — which launched publicly on September 23 — has raised around $110 million.

About West Texas A&M University

WT is located in Canyon, Texas on a 342-acre residential campus. Founded in 1910, the university has been part of the Texas A&M University System since 1990. WT, an institution serving Hispanics since 2016, has approximately 10,000 enrollment and offers 59 undergraduate, 39 master’s, and two doctoral programs. The university is also home to the Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum, the largest history museum in the state and one of the finest art collections in the Southwest. The Buffaloes are members of the NCAA Division II Lone Star Conference and offer 14 men’s and women’s athletic programs.

An Illustrated Guide to Forest Fire Resistant Buildings

The Dixie fire in California was the largest wildfire of 2021 in the United States. It burned from July to October, consuming 963,309 acres and destroying 1,329 structures, including 600 homes. The Dixie Fire was the largest wildfire in California history, but not the largest overall. That honor goes to the August Complex Fire, so named because on August 30, 2020, four fires burned together to create a massive wildfire that consumed 1,032,648 acres, an area larger than the state of Rhode Island. One person died in each of these fires. Yet despite their scale, these fires pale in death and destruction compared to California’s Camp Fire in 2018, which killed 85 people and destroyed 18,804 buildings, or the Tubbs Fire in 2017, which killed 22 people and destroyed 5,636 buildings. And that’s only in the state of California. Although the largest and deadliest US fires of the past decade have all occurred there, notable fires have broken out in Washington (Carlton Complex Fire), Arizona (Yarnell Hill Fire), New Mexico and Arizona (Wallow Fire). In 2020 alone, more than 13 million acres were consumed and nearly 15,000 buildings were destroyed in the United States by “big event” fires (those that burn more than 1,000 acres).

While none of these are the most destructive in US history (compare to The Big Burn of 1910, a single fire that killed 87 people and consumed 3 million acres in the Northern Rockies in August 1910, or the Peshtigo Fire of 1871, which killed 2,500 people and burned 1.2 million acres in Wisconsin and northern Michigan), the incidence of wildfires increased exponentially during recent history. Although there is some debate about whether the total number of wildfires has increased, there is little debate about whether the intensity, area consumed by, and cost of rebuilding to from forest fires have increased. According to NASA, which tracks wildfire activity by satellite, the average annual number of acres burned has steadily increased since 1950, and the number of “megafires” (fires that burn more than 100,000 acres ) has increased over the past two decades.

All of this has profoundly influenced wildfire safety policy in the United States. Traditionally, the recommendation to protect houses was to create a “defensive space” – an area of ​​landscaping with few combustible materials around a house – so that fires had no chance of reaching the building. (Note: The specific zones that define “defensible space” around a home vary. The illustration at left details the three zones that are generally recommended primarily outside of California. The California building code has a definition more stringent which includes a combustible-free zone that extends 30 feet around the house, a zone of low, overgrown vegetation extending 30 to 70 feet, and a reduced fuel zone of 70 feet at the boundary. of ownership. These stricter requirements have also been adopted outside of California, although not as frequently as those shown on the opposite page.)

While defensible space is still a primary strategy for protecting homes, it has proven to be less effective for two reasons: The first is the increased concentration of homes in developments. Smaller lots mean houses often don’t have enough space to create much defensible space around them. Second, the increase in the intensity of wildfires has made blowing embers, which can travel distances measured in kilometers, a primary cause of building fire ignition. The main strategy these days is to harden houses to resist damage.

Read more

DTCC builds industry’s first prototype to support US digital currency

The Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation (DTCC) developed the first prototype to explore how a CBDC could work in the US clearing and settlement infrastructure by leveraging distributed ledger technology (DLT).

The prototype, known as Project Lithium, will measure the benefits of a CBDC and inform the future design of the company’s clearing and settlement offerings.

It will also explore how a CBDC could enable atomic settlement, a conditional settlement that occurs if delivery and payment are received at the same time.

Jennifer Pève

“DTCC has been experimenting with, engaging and leading the conversation around the digitalization of financial markets for several years, and Project Lithium represents the next major step in our exploration of DLT, tokenization and other emerging technologies,” said Jennifer Peve. , Managing Director, Head of Strategy and Business Development at DTCC.

“Project Lithium will lay the groundwork for the financial community to better assess the implications of a CBDC throughout the business life cycle, as interest in this style of financing continues to grow.”

As markets evolve and become more digitized, the use of printed U.S. currency continues to decline while the adoption of tokenized securities grows at a rapid pace.

Unlike private cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin, a CBDC would be issued and backed by the Federal Reserve, just like US dollars and coins.

With this prototype, DTCC, in partnership with The Digital Dollar Project (DDP), aims to demonstrate direct, two-way cash token settlement between participants in real-time delivery versus payment (DVP) settlement.

The pilot will also identify how it can leverage DTCC’s strong clearing and settlement capabilities to fully realize the potential benefits of a CBDC, including: reduced counterparty risk and trapped liquidity; increased capital efficiency; a more efficient automated workflow; ensuring that cash and securities are delivered; and more transparency for regulators.

Project Lithium is the latest effort in DTCC’s ongoing journey to lead the industry toward greater digitalization.

DTCC is developing its Project Lithium pilot project in conjunction with The Digital Dollar Project, a non-profit organization led by former US regulators, renowned technology leaders and executives from consulting firm Accenture.

With seed funding from Accenture, DDP is facilitating a series of retail and wholesale pilots to assess how a central bank-issued currency might work within the US financial infrastructure and social landscape.

“A CBDC could improve time and cost efficiency, provide broader access to currency and central bank payments, while mimicking the characteristics of physical cash in an increasingly digital world,” said J. Christopher Giancarlo, co-founder and executive chairman of The Digital Dollar Project and former chairman of the CFTC.

“We thank DTCC for partnering in the first of a series of pilot projects and its deep commitment to helping the financial community better understand and realize the potential benefits and challenges of a US-backed digital currency.”

David Treat, Global Metaverse and Blockchain Lead at Accenture and Co-Head of DDP, said, “Project Lithium is another key facet of modernizing the infrastructure of major capital markets. The direct exchange of tokenized assets for central bank digital currency provides a formidable foundation for simplification, efficiency, and a new frontier of product and service innovation. We salute DTCC’s continued leadership and direction. »

We Are One Composites: Carbon Arrival, Made in Kamloops

Hannah went out to classic sea otter in California, United States. It’s a four-day racing festival and huge exhibition area. There are races for every type of bike, but there is a strong bent for mountain biking, and if you want to see new products, prototypes and unique bikes, this is the place to be. Head here for all of our 2022 Sea Otter coverage

For those who love carbon bikes but want something a little different, maybe We are a could be interesting. They’ve been making carbon rims for a while, but the bikes are a new addition to the lineup.

What’s really impressive here is that everything you see in this diagram is made by them in Kamloops. That’s a lot of deft carbon layers, as well as machining. They have two laminate shops, one making the frames and the other making the wheels and bars. In total, they have 80 employees.

There is a single “Arrival” frame which can be adjusted by changing the top link to give between 130-170mm of travel.

The “dual shortlink” suspension design is their own, although not subject to patent.

Changing the link changes the bike between models, with the 150 being their first bike and them starting right on the 170 and 130. To preserve geometry, the Arrival 130 and 150 are run at 25mm sag and the Arrival 170 is run at 30mm, with the Arrival 170 having a slightly higher BB height.

Geometry and sizing for the Arrival 150

Even the most jaded of “everything seen” carbon skeptics might be excited about this. The shape of the frame is angular and sculptural, with the hand-painted shaded finish being nicely simple, but not boring.

The titanium bolts on the linkage are one of the few parts they don’t make.

There is no head badge or branding on the bike except for that “finish” under the shock. This is created by leaving the lettering area unpainted, so it is the raw carbon finish that shows through. Frames are hand painted in their own paint shop and each shaded finish is slightly different.

Remember that even the bar and stem are made in-house. It’s as locally grown as it gets (if you live in Kamloops). If they have an idea, they can work it out in-house and have it manufactured and up on a bike to try it out within a day or two.

This little integrated carbon fender was one of those ideas – designed in the morning, ready to test the next day.

Want one? They are making their next production soon and prices will start at $8,999.

Their new “TBR” wheels were also on display – that’s not their name, it just means “To Be Released”. There’s a secret ingredient in the diaper that will provide 30% better impact protection, but they’re not going to talk about it right now. When the wheels are fully launched, they say they will have data to back up that 30% claim.

The wheels have a beveled shape on the rim, giving a shallower crown and giving the spokes a straight run to the hub. Without curvature, there is apparently less fatigue on the nipple bed.

When released, they will be available in 28/30/33 mm widths, in 29 inches only.

Visit their website for more details.

Head here for all of our 2022 Sea Otter coverage

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Improbable announces M², a Metaverse network and ecosystem

Helping Partners Catalyze an Open Metaverse

The M² network will bring together businesses, existing communities and fans of sports, music, fashion and entertainment and allow them to interact in dense virtual spaces with unprecedented fidelity. The network is designed to support integration with existing worlds as well as new projects.

Founded in 2012, Improbable is a leading provider of multiplayer services to over 60 global publishers and, through its large-scale simulation platform, supports the UK government’s defense mission.

Its Morpheus technology is an evolution of the company’s earlier SpatialOS product. The platform now processes over 350 million communication operations per second (or ops) and was first demonstrated in live events with thousands of players in 2021. In January 2022, Improbable announced his transformation to speed up in the metaverse.

Hermann NarulaCEO of Improbable, said, “We founded Improbable to deliver on the promise of amazing online worlds that were more than just games; they were extensions of our lives. I believe the metaverse and the Web3 movement, although very early, represent a unique redefinition of our society towards a “fulfillment economy” where the experiments made by an open network of creators and companies can create enormous opportunities for everyone. M² is our contribution to establishing that future and we hope to help our partners catalyze an open metaverse with many participants and success stories. We are excited to be actively working with some of the best investors in the industry in building this new ecosystem.”

Growing Investments in the Metaverse

According to Bloomberg Intelligence, the global Metaverse revenue opportunity is expected to reach $800 billion by 2024. Companies around the world are investing in the Metaverse, from tech giants to fashion and sports.

“The Metaverse is full of potential and promise, and we believe the pioneering technology created by Improbable will make it happen. We are confident that Improbable will help businesses create and connect exciting virtual worlds and enable meaningful virtual experiences,” commented Sachin Jaitlygeneral partner at Morgan Creek Capital.

Petaluma’s ‘profiling’ case gets national attention with Elle magazine article

The viral video of an Instagram influencer who made false allegations against a local Latino couple is attracting new national attention, as Elle magazine this week broke the story, including the false reporting accusations Sonoma’s mother , Katie Sorensen, is now facing the aftermath of the episode.

Published on April 4 and titled “The Karen Who Cried Kidnapping”, the Elle magazine article chronicles Sadie and Eddie Martinez’s fateful trip to Michael’s craft store in December 2020, and the fallout from the viral videos tipped off. of Sorensen’s breath accusing the couple of stalking her with the intention of kidnapping her children.

Sorensen, who faces three misdemeanor charges for making false reports to police, will appear in court on May 19. She hasn’t returned many requests for comment since being charged, and she hasn’t returned Elle Magazine’s attempts to contact her, according to the publication. .

For Sadie Martinez, the new national spotlight is welcome given that Sorensen’s early videos were viewed 4.5 million times before being deleted from Instagram.

“Any attention to what actually happened, to me, is good attention,” Martinez said in a phone interview Tuesday. “I was really excited, actually.”

Martinez said that since the story was published, she had received a huge outpouring of support, with many telling her they were proud of the family for continuing to draw attention to the false allegations that propelled the Martinezes under the international spotlight against their will.

Martinez said she felt more positive about the case, especially after a Sonoma County Superior Court judge rejected Sorensen’s attempts to have the charges dismissed or reduced. Martinez and her husband will be in court on May 19, and she said she hopes for closure.

“I’m excited to see this and move on,” she said. “But, until there’s some accountability, mentally I can’t.”

Asked if she sees success in raising awareness of the truth in her case, Martinez said the extra attention the Elle magazine article has garnered is no substitute for justice.

“In some ways, I guess the world understands what’s really going on,” Martinez said. “But I don’t think it’s a victory if she’s found not guilty.”

Tyler Silvy is editor of the Petaluma Argus-Courier. Reach him at [email protected], 707-776-8458, or @tylersilvy on Twitter.

“Go on a journey” advises Hasselblad heroine Stephanie Blomkamp

Born in Johannesburg, South Africa, but now based in Cape Town, Stephanie Blomkamp creates beautiful surreal images that are striking and cinematic yet elegant and feminine. She is the founder of Oatha magazine celebrating photographers and championing emerging voices in Africa and she also spends her time mentoring other photographers.

Stephanie strongly believes that film photography shows a dedication to craftsmanship that you don’t get with digital. Most of his work is shot on his beloved Hasselblad 503CXI which was unfortunately stolen from him once, leaving him heartbroken. The story however has a happy ending as she miraculously came back into his life.

She told Hasselblad about the day she found her home and was robbed and how shocked she was when a friend called her, describing a medium format camera she had found for sale in a bargain of vintage cameras in Cape Town, which was indeed his.

Clearly a creative force to be reckoned with, Stephanie has advice on how to overcome self-doubt, stand out, and launch a career in photography. His work has appeared in some of the world’s leading publications, including vogue, Forbes and fashion company and now she has been selected as Hasselblad Heroine 2022.

We caught up with this inspirational photographer to talk about her journey to success and where her love of photography comes from.

Hasselblad heroine Stephanie Blomkamp

(Image credit: Stephanie Blomkamp)

How old were you when you started photography?

I was 14 years old. I pulled out my dad’s camera and have been hooked ever since.

Who or what inspired you to do this?

I’ve always been drawn to visual things. It all started when I got my hands on the tools to create my own images.

Do you have a favorite photo or project you’ve worked on?

Yes, I am the editor of a photography magazine here in South Africa called Oath. It is a platform that defends photographers from all over Africa. What is coming out visually on this side of the world is very exciting. I clearly see my purpose in life, to celebrate the art of photography. Whether it’s shooting my own images or singing the praises of other photographers’ work, my compass always points to photography.

Hasselblad heroine Stephanie Blomkamp

(Image credit: Stephanie Blomkamp)

If you could give your younger self one piece of advice, what would it be?

All roads will eventually lead to where you need to be, no matter how off-road they feel right now. Go on a trip. I’ve learned that the creative process is a roller coaster, with intense ups and downs – so I prepare for both and enjoy the ride.

What does it mean to you to have been chosen as a Hasselblad heroine?

It is an honor to be selected as a Hasselblad heroine. It’s great to be among my fellow Hasselblad Heroines this year and I’m proud to be part of an initiative that supports female photographers. I have admired the brand for a long time and have used my Hasselblad 503CXi camera regularly for over a decade. The quality of it is remarkable. What I like the most about me are the technical elements of the film camera. The mechanism that makes the clicks, when it rings, I feel a real joy. Sometimes that’s the sound of success and I just know I had a good hit.

What was your biggest obstacle to get where you are?

Self-doubt. Something everyone struggles with, but I think it’s acute in most creatives.

Read more:

The best medium format cameras (opens in a new tab)
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Digital Energy Journal | January-February 2022

January-February 2022



February 2022


OPENING


  • Assess your organizational data skills – and understand where you can improve. Data management consultant Jess Kozman holds workshops in Australia to help businesses do just that


PROFESSIONAL DATA MANAGERS SOCIETY EVENT REPORT


  • Data Mesh at Equinor – Equinor finds the concept of “data mesh” very useful in its digital transformation. Sun Maria Lehmann and Jorn Olmein explained

  • Integrate engineering data like Google Maps – The oil and gas industry would benefit from an integrated digital platform to operate on. Gunnar Staff, Technical Advisory Lead, Cognite, shared some insights

  • Facilitate migration to OSDU – Many people in oil and gas companies are hesitant to transfer all their data to “another platform”. CGI’s Michaël van der Haven shared some ways forward

  • Data organization before OSDU – companies have to decide if they will organize and connect it before ingesting it, and whether to opt for an automated or manual method. Schlumberger’s Jamie Cruise outlined the options

  • What good research looks like – exactly the results you want, search multiple systems at once and have taxonomies you can reuse in other systems, said Lee Hatfield of Flare Solutions

  • UKCS Data Maturity – companies sit on a wide range. TLB’s Dave Mackinnon discussed the result

  • Bringing O&G data skills to new areas of the energy industry – Jess Kozman, Information Management Consultant, shared her insights

  • Public dashboards of OGA’s production data – Robert Swiergon, OGA Technical Data Manager, explained how it works

  • Farewell Speech by Ross Philo as CEO of Energisticsgiven at the SPDM meeting in November, with an unexpected departure of former colleagues


OPERATIONS


  • Work remotely with the help of a managed IT service provider (MSP) – how much an MSP can do to help businesses meet cybersecurity and productivity challenges. Scott Davidson, Managing Director of MSP ISN Solutions explains

  • Siemens and the “brutal truth” about IIOT – Industrial IoT projects rarely offer quick wins, require more than CEO support, and can fail if you insist on building your own software or getting feedback after a year. Some tips from Siemens


CYBER-SECURITY


  • Cyren is a better way to stop phishing emails – rather than trying to scan all messages for phishing before they arrive in an inbox, there are technologies that follow all the links in them to see where they lead

  • Will Colonial Pipeline motivate hackers to keep trying? Ransomware operators are learning from experience, as they learned during an attack on a Los Angeles hospital in 2016, that hospitals pay ransoms. We spoke to expert Paul Prudhomme


SMART CONTRACTS


  • Why blockchain is good for smart contracts – Blockchain is not the only technology we can use to enable smart contracts, but it generates momentum in the implementation of smart contract systems. Data Gumbo’s Andrew Bruce explains more

  • Smart contracts related to equipment operations – It is possible for oil and gas companies to have smart contracts that automatically trigger when certain equipment factors are met, using Kongsberg’s Kognitwin integrated with Data Gumbo’s smart grids

Open the magazine (pdf) in a new window

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Join us tonight for Broadview’s National Online Book Club

join us for wide view‘s National Online Reading Club tonight at 7 p.m. EDT via Zoom. *Digital Editor Emma Prestwich will speak with three contributors to our April/May issue:

Jonisha Lewinson was interviewed for an article in the United Church’s Focus section on the Black Youth Scholarship Program. His research focused primarily on the mental health of black people, including youth, within the United Church of Canada.

Luke Ottenhof is the author of Wetlands vs Developers, which explores the Battle of Kingston, Ontario, on the site of a former tannery. The story examines a developer’s proposed plans for the contaminated plot of land and the wide variety of defenders who have spoken out against it.

Arun Srinivasan wrote The good fight about racism in Canadian hockey, a sport in which people of color and Indigenous peoples are uniquely underrepresented. He spoke with insiders who are working on solutions, including a former coach and players.

We ask that as you read these articles prior to the event, please write down any questions that come to mind. You will have the opportunity to interview the guests live! We encourage public participation.

We look forward to seeing you online and guarantee it will be an hour well spent.

Sign up for our newsletter to get the link to sign up!

Ouges casual spring dress will ring in so many compliments

Us Weekly has affiliate partnerships, so we may receive compensation for certain links to products and services.

Dresses, dresses and still dresses ! That’s all we have in mind right now when it comes to spring fashion. We’ve been looking forward to reuniting with all of our favorite dresses, and now that the season has officially arrived, we finally can. Of course, we also think that add new styles to our wardrobe is in order!

We love ringing in a new season while shopping, and if you’re not sure where to start, fear not. Shop with us at your back, of course. There are tons of trendy styles on the market, but we’re here to highlight a tried-and-true piece of clothing that will go a long way – just like that of OUGES!

OUGES Women’s Casual Floral Summer Dress

Amazon

See it!

Get the OUGES Women’s Casual Floral Summer Dress for prices from $23 at Amazon! Please note that prices are accurate at the date of publication, March 22, 2022, but are subject to change.

Shoppers say every time they wear this best-selling style, they get compliments left and right. It has a halter neckline top, as well as a clean cut through the waist that flares out into a beautiful circular skirt. The hem length is cropped, but it’s definitely not a mini dress – so you won’t feel like you’re wearing a too risque look. Another detail we’re obsessed with is the tie at the back of the neckline that creates a cute cutout!

OUGES Women's Casual Floral Summer Dress

OUGES Women’s Casual Floral Summer Dress

Amazon

See it!

Get the OUGES Women’s Casual Floral Summer Dress for prices from $23 at Amazon! Please note that prices are accurate at the date of publication, March 22, 2022, but are subject to change.

The cut of this dress can flatter so many different body types and it’s multifunctional too. You can wear it to family gatherings, weekend brunches, casual weddings, and just about any other iCal event. It comes in a host of patterns to suit all those occasions – if you’re heading for a daytime affair, one of the lighter floral options would be a great choice, while the darker geometric prints are best reserved for the night. Reviewers rave that the fit is “perfect” and note that it’s also very comfortable. Whenever you feel like swinging a rock this spring, it’s the right one you can always count on yourself!

See: Get it OUGES Women’s Casual Floral Summer Dress for prices from $23 at Amazon! Please note that prices are accurate at the date of publication, March 22, 2022, but are subject to change.

Not what you’re looking for? To verify more styles of OUGES and shop all clothes, shoes and jewelry available on Amazon! Don’t forget to check all Amazon Daily Deals!

Still haven’t found what you’re looking for? Check out these related product articles:

Discover more of our choices and offers here!

This article is brought to you by the Shop With Us team at Us Weekly. The Shop With Us team aims to highlight products and services that our readers might find interesting and useful, such as face masks, self-tanners, Lululemon-style leggings, and all the best gifts for everyone in your life. The selection of products and services, however, is in no way intended to constitute an endorsement of Us Weekly or any celebrity mentioned in the post.

The Shop With Us team can receive products from manufacturers for free to test. Additionally, Us Weekly receives compensation from the manufacturer of the products we write about when you click on a link and then purchase the product featured in an article. This does not determine our decision as to whether a product or service is featured or recommended or not. Shop With Us operates independently of the advertising sales team. We appreciate your feedback at [email protected] Good shopping!

Bewitched by bubbles – SRQist :: SRQ Magazine article by Abby Weingarten

Blaise Ryndes, creator of the Spheres Bubble Show.

Blaise Ryndes has been doing magic since the age of nine, but captivating crowds with bubble art is his passion du jour. Appearing in season 13 of America’s Got Talent, the local phenom bubbled with Howie Mandel, put Tyra Banks in a giant bubble and received a standing ovation. He’s since resumed his act in Sarasota, performing his all-ages “Spheres Bubble Show” last January in the outdoor courtyard of The Bazaar on Apricot & Lime. His act was billed as a mix of Cirque du Soleil meets Blue Man Group and a “comic fusion of art, science and magic.” I absolutely loved playing Bazaar. It was a pleasure to see the smiling faces of all the children and families who were captivated by my show,” says Ryndes. “Festive bubbles filled the air and created a truly magical atmosphere.” Since then, he’s booked reservations across the country at Disney World, the Boston Children’s Museum, the Florida Aquarium and Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital. Ryndes will also perform on his brand new “Expand The Universe Tour” on June 26 at the Manatee Performing Arts Center in Bradenton.

Bewitched by bubbles – SRQist :: SRQ Magazine article by Abby Weingarten

Blaise Ryndes, creator of the Spheres Bubble Show.

Blaise Ryndes has been doing magic since the age of nine, but captivating crowds with bubble art is his passion of the day. Appearing in season 13 of America’s Got Talent, the local phenom bubbled with Howie Mandel, put Tyra Banks inside a giant bubble and received a standing ovation. Since then, he’s resumed his act in Sarasota, performing his “Spheres Bubble Show” for all ages last January in the outdoor courtyard of The Bazaar on Apricot & Lime. His act was billed as a mix of Cirque du Soleil meets Blue Man Group and a “comic fusion of art, science and magic.” I absolutely loved playing Bazaar. It was a pleasure to see the smiling faces of all the children and families who were captivated by my show,” says Ryndes. “Festive bubbles filled the air and created a truly magical atmosphere.” Since then, he has booked bookings across the country at Disney World, the Boston Children’s Museum, the Florida Aquarium and Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital. Ryndes will also perform on his brand new “Expand The Universe Tour” on June 26 at the Manatee Performing Arts Center in Bradenton.

Institutions are expanding their digital asset offerings

Prometheum raised funds ahead of the launch of its regulated alternative trading system for digital asset securities while US broker Cowen announced the public launch of its digital asset division.

Prometheum raised over $15 million prior to the launch of Prometheum ATS, which is regulated by both FINRA and the United States Securities and Exchange Commission. The current round brings the total investment in Prometheum to over $42 million.

Aaron Kaplan, co-CEO and co-founder of Prometheum, told Markets Media that the ATS will launch in the second quarter of this year, or early in the third quarter, once integration with the custodian is complete.

“The first year we will be open to institutions, then we will move towards retail investors,” he added.

Prometheum was founded in 2017 by a group of Wall Street lawyers with the aim of enabling the trading of digital assets under existing securities laws. From a compliance perspective, it is much easier for institutions to connect to a regulated trading venue.

Kaplan continued that Gary Gensler’s comments show that the SEC Chairman views many digital assets as securities that must be traded under applicable regulations.

“The writing is on the wall and Gensler is leading the charge,” Kaplan added.

Additionally, President Biden issued an Executive Order on Responsible Development of Digital Assets on March 9, which Kaplan said will increase institutional interest in the sector.

“This is the first step in the process by which the federal government collectively seeks to regulate digital assets and the potential implications for investors,” Kaplan added. “We were hoping for a bit more information on the implications for the titles.”

Kaplan went on to say that the government has allowed digital assets to operate in a gray area and the executive order is the official statement that this is coming to an end.

Aaron Kaplan, Prometheum

“Many digital asset companies will need to modify their internal compliance mechanisms,” he said. “However, we assumed from the outset that digital assets should comply with securities laws.”

If the digital assets are deemed to be securities, they must be held by a registered custodian under federal securities laws. Prometheum has also applied to be licensed as a specialty broker, allowing it to operate a digital depository.

“Becoming a special-purpose broker advances our game plan of launching a comprehensive ecosystem for issuing, trading, and custodial of digital assets,” Kaplan said.

The importance of custody has been underscored by State Street Digital by choosing technology from London-based fintech Copper.co to develop and launch digital custody, subject to regulatory approval.

Many regulated asset managers can only use a regulated custodian, which was not available for digital assets.

Swen Werner, head of digital curation for State Street Digital, told Markets Media that the company aims to create an integrated offering for customers holding both digital and traditional titles. “We want to be able to bridge the old and the new,” he said.

In the UK, TP ICAP is expanding its digital asset custody network to include BitGo and Komainu, two crypto asset custodians.

TP ICAP’s new digital asset platform, which awaits regulatory approval from the Financial Conduct Authority, will include a wholesale electronic over-the-counter market for spot trading of crypto assets and provide processing services direct and payment clearing for transactions executed in a network of digital assets. guardians. Hudson River Trading, Susquehanna, Flow Traders, Jane Street and Virtu Financial will be market makers on the new platform.

Cowen Digital

Cowen announced the public launch of its digital assets division, led by Drew Forman.

Dan Charney, Co-Chairman of Cowen and Company, said in a statement, “We are very pleased to publicly announce Cowen Digital, which has been trading cryptos on behalf of our clients for several months. Working with our integrated partners Standard Custody and leading brokerage solutions provider, Digital Prime Technologies, Cowen Digital provides our institutional clients with the same level of thought leadership, product capability, service and professionalism they expect from Cowen.

Cowen Digital will offer comprehensive transaction execution and compliant custody solutions to institutional clients, with custodial solutions provided through the company’s strategic partnership with PolySign’s Standard Custody & Trust.

Standard Custody & Trust. has received a trust company charter from the New York State Department of Financial Services, as a regulated qualified custodian of cryptocurrencies and other digital assets.

In May 2021, Cowen made a $25 million strategic investment in PolySign when the broker led a $53 million first close of the fintech’s Series B fundraising.

PolySign and Cowen said at the time that they would work together to implement a comprehensive digital asset solution for institutional clients and to integrate PolySign’s digital banking technology into Cowen’s sales and trading platform.

Cowen Digital said it will allow institutional investors to access the company’s aggregated liquidity, use proprietary algorithms, benefit from streamlined operations, capital efficiency and post-trade reporting, trade directly from Standard Custody’s cold storage solution, avoiding pre-funding requirements.

The company’s future features will include derivatives and futures, financing solutions as well as institutional DeFi and NFT access.

Working to Increase Regional Internet Speeds | Western magazine

Labor has pledged to boost the internet in the regions, increasing the number of homes and businesses with access to world-class speeds.

The party says it will increase the percentage of those with access to speeds over 100Mbps from one-third to 80% in Australia’s regions and rural areas by the end of 2025.

The measure would benefit 3.7 million households and businesses.

It builds on the Labor Party’s commitment to expand full fiber NBN access to 1.5 million premises by 2025 as part of a $3.2 billion consolidated plan.

Labor communications spokeswoman Michelle Rowland said the party would increase satellite data allowances as well as fixed wireless speeds if it forms government in May.

“We will also push fiber much deeper into regional Australia, benefiting an additional 660,000 homes and businesses,” she said.

“Regional Australia will have better broadband under Labour.”

All NBN users will be able to access speeds of 100 Mbps and up to 85% will be able to access 250 Mbps, benefiting some 755,000 homes and businesses.

Monthly data allowances for 300,000 premises on SkyMuster satellite customers will also be increased to 90 GB per month.

The unmetered time limit for SkyMuster plus data will also be extended to 16 hours, from the current six-hour window.

Australian Associated Press

To publish or not to publish? Learn how to organize your digital dance footprint

On a blinding Saturday last September, choreographer Joanna Kotze premiered Big Beats before a small audience gathered in Manhattan’s Riverside Park. Lasting just 15 minutes, Big Beats, which featured a cast of 20 brightly-clad downtown dancers moving synchronously in architectural formations, was presented for free. After using his grant money and presenter funding to compensate the dancers, Kotze paid a professional videographer out of his own pocket. Just as she usually does after a work premieres, Kotze posted the whole thing on her website and shared the link with her followers through her newsletter and social media. The approach, particularly in sharing shorter choreography than his typical one-night-stand pieces, has worked: Kotze is now working on commissions to stage Big Beats at two schools, a festival, and a company. “I know one of those presenters saw it in person, but the other three saw the video,” she says.

Joanna Kotze in How will we be when we get there. Photo by Maria Baranova, courtesy of Kotze.
Nel Shelby directs a digital program for American Ballet Theatre. Photo by Christopher Duggan, courtesy of Shelby.

The advent of online accessibility, especially in the wake of a pandemic-influenced digital wave, means that choreographers like Kotze constantly ask themselves the same question: how much work is the right amount to post online? ? It’s a complex calculation, requiring artists to become experts in marketing, video editing and budgeting, in addition to dance creation. But when it comes to maintaining your digital dance footprint, finding the right balance between too much and too little can pay off big, opening up all sorts of new opportunities.

Share your gifts

For many dancers, especially those who didn’t grow up with social media, the concept of constantly having to sell themselves to stay relevant can feel overwhelming. But Nel Shelby, a dance videographer who’s been documenting performances since 2001, developed a more positive approach: “I learned early on that marketing is just a way to share your unique gifts,” she says. “Dancing online is a way to get people from all over the world to see you, which might get someone excited about your work.”

But how are dancers supposed to sift through the mercurial web of social media sites so they know where to direct their time and energy? Jennifer Archibald, Artistic Director of Arch Dance Company and Resident Choreographer of the Cincinnati Ballet, considers the diversity of her audience when deciding where to post. “A 70-year-old director doesn’t necessarily have an Instagram account,” says Archibald, who will focus on Facebook, LinkedIn or YouTube for this demographic. She also responds to requests for orders with a password on her private Vimeo page, where producers can view full-length versions of her repertoire. But when advertising its ArchCore40 summer program, Archibald posts short ads on Instagram, where the intensive’s target participants — 17 to 30-year-olds — spend more time.

Tulsa Ballet at break bricks. Photo by Kate Luber, courtesy of Tulsa Ballet.

Invest in documentation

Nel Shelby with colleague Ashli ​​Bickford while filming for a Ballet Hispánico digital gala. Photo by Christopher Duggan, courtesy of Shelby.

Although Kotze could have asked a friend to film Big Beats on an iPhone, she made the decision to pay for a professional videographer and says it was worth it. “It’s part of the formula,” she says. “For people to really understand the work, you have to put effort into documentation.” Shelby says she’s noticed that artists who consistently invest in documentation or live streaming often find continued success over the years. During the pandemic, she and her team also discovered the benefit of having camera-only races, allowing videographers to rehearse their moves alongside dancers and then filming specifically for the camera. “The best products are when I have the choreographer sitting right next to me behind the monitors and he gives me notes as if they were dancers on stage, and then I give notes to my team,” adds Shelby. “It becomes a complete collaboration.” This type of intentionality yields much stronger results, providing more opportunities for dance makers down the road.

For Archibald, preparation is essential. She aims to always have digital packages of her materials ready to share. “If you sleep on it, someone else is working,” she says. “If a producer on the subway asks, ‘Hey, can I have a video of your work?’ then you should be able to send it to them before they go out on the platform.

fear of plagiarism

Nel Shelby works with Jessica Lang and Kanji Segawa. Courtesy of Shelby.

Every time a choreographer puts their work online, there is an inherent risk that it could be stolen and copied, without credit. But for sales agents Julie McDonald and Tony Selznick, it’s a risk worth taking. “The internet is a free game for everyone. I say to artists, ‘Be careful,'” Selznick says. “Don’t take things out that you’re afraid to protect.”
Selznick and McDonald have seen many artists dramatically improve their careers by posting their work online. In September 2020, at the height of the pandemic, their client James Alonzo released A Brand New Day on YouTube, an energetic, street-savvy piece set to a song by The Wiz. Although relatively unknown at the time, the success of the video helped him score shows on Broadway and in Las Vegas. “If he was worried about having his choreography stolen, he might never have posted, but his goal was to get his work seen,” says Selznick.

by Jennifer Archibald break bricks. Photo by Kate Luber, courtesy of Tulsa Ballet

The push for accessibility

Almost everyone in the dance world can agree that seeing something online just isn’t the same as seeing it in person. But offering a virtual option shouldn’t detract from the in-room experience; instead, it may just make it more accessible. For the premiere of Kotze’s new feature Electric Eye at Brooklyn’s Irondale in February, she sold discounted tickets for a one-night-only live broadcast of the show. “I would prefer people to see it live, but I was excited to have an option for people who don’t feel comfortable going to a live show or live across the country,” she says.

by Jennifer Archibald break bricks. Photo Jeremy Charles, courtesy of Tulsa Ballet

Since the start of the pandemic, Shelby has seen the benefits of this kind of accessibility time and time again. After working with the Juilliard School to broadcast its New Dances program live, she heard that people around the world were tuning in and had never been able to see the famous conservatory in action before. Shelby also broadcast the Barnard College Fall Concert live, allowing parents of select students and distant family members to see their loved ones perform for the first time; Barnard plans to continue the practice even after theaters return to full capacity.

Archibald dreams of taking accessibility one step further: Last fall, the Tulsa Ballet debuted its Breakin’ Bricks, a carefully crafted full-length piece to commemorate the centennial of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. , Archibald brought in seven black dancers to work with the predominantly white company. She considers the piece to be historic. “But the only people who saw it were in Tulsa, and that’s something that could have a huge impact on ballet,” says Archibald. University dance departments wanting to add it to their curricula asked Archibald for a link, leading him to reimagine how dancers could share their work. “We should be selling digital versions of our plays like the way people walk into the bookstore at the start of the school year and buy books,” she says. “For some reason, the dance industry never thought that our works could be monetized to this level. But we are actually worth a lot; that’s what we need to be aware of when exposing ourselves.

Mastery of social networks

Joanna Kotze in How will we be when we get there. Photo by Maria Baranova, courtesy of Kotze.

Feeling overwhelmed by the plethora of platforms available? Focus on what makes the most sense for your images and who you want to reach. While some choreographers use Facebook, YouTube, TikTok and LinkedIn to share their work, Instagram and Vimeo are by far the most popular.

instagram
Sales agents Julie McDonald and Tony Selznick create a personalized approach for each client, but Instagram remains their benchmark. “It’s the main platform that we promote,” Selznick says. They found the visual platform led to success with their artists. Choreographers Jennifer Archibald and Joanna Kotze both use the app to share photos and short snippets of their work. And though Instagram accounts often veer towards the personal, Archibald and Kotze insist on only showing their professional life. “The world has made a shift in marketing, but to me, social media is strictly work,” says Archibald. “You don’t know what I’m going to eat in the morning.”

Vimeo
If Instagram is best for teasers and reels, Vimeo is great for posting full pieces and can become an easy-to-use digital archive for choreographers to organize their works. “After a premiere, I put a link in my Instagram bio to the piece on Vimeo if people want to see it,” Kotze explains. Archibald often posts complete works privately on Vimeo; it will share a password with directors and producers interested in orders. “You can include a longer description on the exact topic of the article and give credit to everyone who was involved,” she adds.

Manufacturing Outlook MHI CMO Carol Miller Pre-MODEX Magazine Profiles

Industry journalist TR Cutler recently interviewed Carol Miller, MHI’s Director of Marketing, about material handling trends, the impact of COVID on the industry, and the upcoming MODEX 2022 event in Atlanta March 28-31. Read the full article in the March issue of Manufacturing prospects.

Miller has over 29 years of marketing and communications experience in the material handling industry. She leads marketing outreach for MHI, including its MODEX and ProMat events.

Miller shared: “When I joined MHI material handling was seen as a more siled function within the four walls of the facility and MHI reflected that. Most of our members didn’t really see their place in the big supply chain. What surprised me the most was how this has changed, and materials handling is now seen as the real driver of the supply chain ecosystem and how all movement and handling of materials and products – whether inside or outside the four walls of a facility – is part of a highly interdependent supply chain ecosystem at every link in the chain.

“The pandemic has changed so much for our industry. Supply chain has always been an ever-changing and evolving industry, but now that change has become more revolutionary due to the disruptions caused by the pandemic. As enterprises seek solutions to mitigate these disruptions and risks, MHI members are leading the way in this change with solutions that make operations faster and more accurate, transparent and agile,” added Miller.

Jacket Media is the parent company of Manufacturing Outlook magazine. The publication highlights current manufacturing trends.

About TR Cutler, Inc.

Thomas R. Cutler celebrates the 23rd anniversary of the Manufacturing Media Consortium, a group of more than 9,000 publishers, journalists, freelancers, economists, addressing the industrial sector. Cutler and his team work to keep up with industry sector trends including manufacturing, distribution, supply chain, robotics, technology, Industry 4.0, IIoT and more.

Cutler has personally authored over 8,000 articles for a wide range of leading manufacturing periodicals, industry publications and trade journals. He was recently named the most influential supply chain journalist by AI Global Media. Cutler is the world’s most published freelance industry journalist, and over 5,000 industry leaders follow Cutler on Twitter daily at @ThomasRCutler.

Media Contact
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Lil Nas X’s First 24 Hours Back Online Was A Delight

Lil Nas X’s tweets are always a treat, but the one he posted Wednesday at 12:51 p.m. was on another level, mostly because it signaled that after a nearly four-month absence from social media, the 22-year-old rapper is finally back online. “Why are people surprised that I’ve been away for so long?” he asked. wrotereferencing her baby’s birth journey (aka her album Montero). “Have you really never heard of maternity leave?” Echoing the many fans who jumped into responses, he later posted, “I’m so happy to be back on the internet. I missed so much. Freshly reconnected with his supporters, he then came clean: “ok, I’ll be honest, I didn’t post online because I have to bbl.”

So where has Lil Nas X been all this time? Trying out new hairstyles and, more importantly, working on a new “almost done” album. According to the two screenshots he posted, subtitle “Which one do you all want first?”, two releases are imminent: “Down Souf Hoes” with Saucy Santana, which is “a strip club anthem”, and “Late to the Party” with Youngboy, which is for the streets. As for who else will make an appearance on the album, Lil Nas X is currently taking suggestions for “Lean on My Body,” which he previewed in the video below. (This n It’s not that there was any doubt, but it’s already a bop.) Meanwhile, he delightfully retweeted and responded to his fans.

Meanwhile, Lil Nas X’s TikTok account has shown signs of life for the first since December 8, 2021:

Which brings us to perhaps Lil Nas X’s best post in the past 24 or so hours: another look at “Lean on My Body,” this time in the form of a video of the shirtless rapper mimicking playing the keyboard while apparently walking on a treadmill. .

AB InBev adds an electric truck to its delivery fleet

AB InBev has completed its first 100% electric and emission-free beer delivery to Brussels with the introduction of the Jupiler E-truck to its fleet.

The truck uses 100% green electricity from solar panels installed on the roof of AB InBev’s depot in Anderlecht.

The brewer aims to carry out all its urban deliveries with “low or zero emission” vehicles as part of its global commitment to achieve net zero across its entire chain by 2040.

AB InBev electric truck

The MAN Electric Truck used by AB InBev has a capacity of 160 autonomous kilometers which covers an average of ten Brussels companies in a single trip.

The vehicle is completely CO2 neutral, and its manufacturer MAN is about to switch the current energy supply of its production plants to green hydrogen (H2), so that the entire “Well to Wheel” achieves CO2 neutrality.

The vehicle is one of the first electric trucks marketed in Europe and rolls off the production line as an electric truck.

Until now, many electric vehicles have been converted diesel cars, making them less efficient and harder to scale.

Philippe Seminck, Logistics Director BeNeLux and France at AB InBev, said: “As a brewer who depends on natural ingredients, we consider it our responsibility to focus on reducing CO2 in order to achieve our goal. net zero.

“In the long term, for example, we want to move to a complete low-emission fleet in Brussels. We want to lead the way and inspire other companies.”

Green logistics

AB InBev is constantly testing different technologies in its quest to become a leader in green logistics and claims to be the first brewer to have an E-truck in Belgium.

Seminck added: “For short distances in city centers electric driving is the future, for long distances we are looking at technologies like hydrogen. From this year, we will no longer buy diesel trucks for Brussels.

“Our goal is to reach Net Zero by 2040 across our entire value chain, from farmer to consumer, logistics accounts for 10% of our emissions across the entire chain.”

© 2022 European supermarket magazine – your source for the latest supply chain news. Article by Conor Farrelly. Click on subscribe register for ESM: European Supermarket Magazine.

Rowing The Distance – SRQist :: SRQ Magazine Article by Abby Weingarten

New Crew SRQ is racing into top-level rankings

New College of Florida thesis student Antonia “Toni” Ginsberg-Klemmt is transforming the rowing landscape—or rather, waterscape—in Sarasota. Her team, New Crew SRQ, became the first multi-school collegiate rowing team on the Suncoast a year ago, and she and her athletes have since been winning regattas and gaining international attention. In fact, in February, a renowned coach from Oxford, England, named John Hill joined the team as a guest coach. “I’m so excited about the growth of New Crew,” says Ginsberg-Klemmt, the team founder/captain, who is also an award-winning entrepreneur.

FOUNDER/OWNER TONI GINSBERG-KLEMMT CONTINUES TO STEER TOWARDS AN INCLUSIVE CREW CLUB FOR ADAPTIVE ATHLETES. NEW CREW SRQ ATHLETES ROW AT NATHAN BENDERSON AQUATIC PARK

“My goal is for New Crew SRQ to be an inclusive space for adaptive athletes from all backgrounds and abilities in the rowing capital of the US” Ginsberg-Klemmt, a rower since seventh grade, is a 2018 graduate of Pine View School who is double majoring in physics and environmental studies at New College. She even won a coveted 2021 OZY Genius Award for a portable, solar-powered vehicle carport she invented. She founded New Crew SRQ in 2019 and, in March 2021, it became an official club and partnership between New College and the Suncoast Aquatic Nature Center Associates Inc.—the nonprofit organization that operates Nathan Benderson Park for Sarasota County.

In November, New Crew SRQ rowers competed against athletes from across the state in the “Head of the 941” regatta and earned numerous accolades—including several first- and second-place finishes. Ginsberg-Klemmt continues to broaden her vision for the team. “I have been working with my good friend and mentor, Bob Berry from Benderson Park, on coaching blind rowers with his company, Remote Coxswain—as well as adaptive rowing for amputees and paraplegic athletes,” she says. “I’m just continuing to expand our team’s core values ​​of positivity and inclusion—for all types of rowers to blossom.”

Dry aged and family forged

Alpine Steakhouse: A staple of Sarasota’s restaurant community for nearly half a century has emerged from intensive renovation with a new look and fresh outlook.

Owner Matt Rebhan and his family welcome meat lovers to Sarasota’s oldest steakhouse restaurant, meat market (butcher) and small specialty grocery store – all under one roof

A restaurant renovation had been on the back burner for years at Alpine Steakhouse. But after a family tragedy, followed directly by a global pandemic, Matt Rebhan was finally ready to move on. “I’ve wanted to do this for a long time, but it was put on hold for a number of reasons,” says Rebhan, whose infant son, Logan, died of cancer after a year-and-a-half battle in March. 2020. “We just decided it was time to move on this summer.”

PHOTOGRAPH BY WYATT KOSTYGAN

A staple of the Sarasota restaurant community since 1975 (and the Florida home of the TurDucKen), Alpine has now emerged with a new look and fresh outlook. “Any business that’s been around for nearly 50 years and still doing well is truly an accomplishment,” says Rebhan. “Of course, we couldn’t have done it without our loyal clientele, some of whom have been coming for 47 to 48 years.” The last few years have certainly been among the most difficult. “In this city, there is so much growth that places can be neglected and ignored if no effort is made to maintain and improve it,” says Rebhan. With this in mind, the Alpine team has redone its meat display cases, its toilets and its floor in front of the house. Still under construction, an air-conditioned wine cellar (for more than 600 bottles) should be completed soon.

Alpine Steakhouse, 4520 S. Tamiami Trl, Sarasota, 941-922-3797, alpinesteak.com, @alpinesteakhouse

ALPINE STEAKHOUSE, 4520 S. TAMIAMI TRL, SARASOTA, 941-922-3797, ALPINESTEAK.COM, @ALPINESTEAKHOUSE

Today, the restaurant’s past – which began with revolutionary New York butcher Karl Ehmer before Rebhan’s grandfather Henry took over (it’s still a father-son operation with Mark and Matt Rebhan) – merges with his hopeful present. Alpine is the first and only location in Florida that sells fresh TurDucKen, a Cajun dish consisting of a boneless whole turkey stuffed with a boneless whole chicken, a boneless whole duck, and a mix of sausages and dressing seasoned. Also on the menu are dry-aged steaks, braised duck confit, traditional German specialties like wienerschnitzel and sauerbraten, Japanese Kobe burgers and New York reubens. “We are grateful for the past and the present,” says Rebhan, “and optimistic about the future.”

Think inside the box – Fourrage :: SRQ Magazine article by Andrew Fabian

Nikki Lum-Kleiber and David Kleiber carry the torch of a family restaurant into the future. Photograph by Wyatt Kostygan

It’s hard to imagine a more loaded question than “what do you want to be when you grow up?” Parents want their children to climb the mythical ladder of upward mobility, believing that their children’s lives will be easier and more fulfilling if they could simply follow the advice of their dear old mom and dad. This is especially true in the restaurant industry, where nights, weekends and holidays offer no quarter of the toil of a hot kitchen. What if the family restaurant was already successful? And if the children felt at home there? What if they had some exciting new ideas to move the restaurant forward into the future? These questions are answered at Stiks.

THE FRESH ROLL SHRIMP IS BRIGHT AND DENSE, WITH A NICE ACCENT OF MINT COMPLEMENTING THE PEANUT SAUCE

Occupying the former A Taste of Asia space on Tamiami Trail, owned and operated by Lam and Selina Lum for over a decade, Stiks is the freshly updated concept of daughter Nikki Lum-Kleiber and son-in-law David Kleiber . Rather than completely reinventing the menu, the budding married couple turned it into a set of brighter, more health-conscious and customizable offerings loaded with gluten-free, vegan and vegetarian options. What they’ve reinvented is the way food is delivered, adopting a fast-casual model to go along with the hip decor that makes the space feel more like an airy lounge than a sit-down restaurant. .

    The Lao curry noodle soup that put A Taste of Asia on the map returns as a customizable dish that now comes as a vegan option.

THE LAO CURRY NOODLE SOUP THAT PUT A TASTE OF ASIA ON THE MAP IS RETURNING AS A CUSTOMIZABLE DISH THAT NOW COMES AS A VEGAN OPTION.

The most pressing concern for anyone savvy enough to have incorporated A Taste of Asia’s Lao Curry Noodle Soup into their cooking routine is whether or not the dish has disappeared into the modernized concept. Don’t worry: the soup stays. “It was by far one of the most popular dishes on A Taste of Asia,” says Lum-Kleiber, “so there was no way to get rid of it.” Brimming with aromas of lemongrass, the coconut milk broth has enough of the homemade red curry base to excite the taste buds with a smooth, well-balanced heat. Green onions and cilantro enhance the earthy tones, while rice noodles, bean sprouts and purple cabbage fill it up in a hearty bowl of everything delicious from Southeast Asian cuisines. Stiks has, however, made a thoughtful addition to Lum’s original preparation, offering both a vegan version (with vegetable broth) and a non-vegan version (with chicken broth). To top it off, diners choose between meat protein, vegan protein, or shrimp.

Sweet Potato Glass Noodles provide a starchy base for the delicious taste of wok-fried green onions.

GLASS SWEET POTATO NOODLES PROVIDE A STARCHY BASE FOR THE DELICIOUS FLAVOR OF WOK SAMPLES.

For noodle lovers, a wonderful Pad Thai offers something familiar and perfectly acceptable when you don’t want to get bogged down in all the delicious permutations available on the menu. Sweet potato noodles, on the other hand, are more like an event. Thin sweet potato glass noodles – so called because of their transparency – are sautéed with onion, scallion, cilantro and bean sprouts, along with dinner’s choice of protein. The aroma itself immediately whets the appetite, a feature of seared onion that seems almost as paramount as grilled meat. Dense and hearty, the noodles alone add a lot of weight to the dish which seems at odds with the small take-out container it sits in. But, when buying something other than soup, Stiks offers the option of small fries chicken pieces as an addition. Rest assured, no meat is needed for this meal to split in two, but it is freshly fried chicken.

A revamped modern space invites a new wave of foodies seeking modern Southeast Asian cuisine.

A RENOVATED MODERN SPACE INVITES A NEW WAVE OF GOURMETS IN SEARCH OF MODERN SOUTHEAST ASIAN CUISINE.

A nam sod chicken is about as bright and energetic as a top 40 on the charts. Made with diced chicken, julienned ginger, onion strips, scallions, peanuts and cilantro, the entire collection of chunks are tossed in a zesty, flavorful mix of lime juice and sauce of fish. Similar in flavor profile to Peruvian ceviche, this fresh and perky meal leaves a lingering fullness due to its high protein composition. Likewise, the fresh shrimp roll packs a lot of bright flavor into a seemingly small dish that belies his long sense of accomplishment. This luminosity mainly comes from the fresh mint leaves inside the sticky rice paper, while the prolonged feeling of satiety comes from the shrimp and rice noodles inside.

Stiks, 4413 S Tamiami Trl., Sarasota, 941-923-2742, tasteofasiasarasota.com, @stikssarasota

STIKS, 4413 S TAMIAMI TRL., SARASOTA, 941-923-2742, TASTEOFASIASARASOTA.COM, @STIKSSARASOTA

But, if one dish truly exemplifies how young restaurateurs have found ways to freshen up age-old dishes, it’s Orange Chicken and Orange Tofu. Listed in the “sweet and sticky” section of the menu, fried chicken pieces or fried tofu cubes are tossed in an orange sauce that bursts with real orange flavor (the Kleibers use copious amounts of zest orange) while retaining that familiar stickiness that makes certain sauces a guilty pleasure. Of course, it’s also nice to bite into a piece of lightly breaded chicken at Stiks and immediately go for the meat rather than wondering if the piece is really just a piece of breading like in many joints. to take away.

For a sweet and fresh treat, Stiks offers an assortment of Southeast Asian staples like Thai iced tea and boba. Taro boba, purple and silky as a satin pillowcase, tastes like cereal milk infused with an earthy electrolyte drink, a combination that sounds odd on paper but is a joy in practice. A brown sugar black tea boba, however, is truly exceptional. The combination of caramelized sugar with the slight bitterness of black tea makes this boba a case study in how to mix opposites. While it’s helpful that both flavors reside in a rich, creamy base, it’s still a nifty invention with beautiful results.

Returning to the original set of questions, we find optimism and promise. As the Lums pass their heritage on to a second generation, the familiar flavors remain. But those flavors have been adapted to the modern fixation on dietary designations and clean eating, as well as the “new normal” requirement that a restaurant be nimble, adaptable, fast-paced and laid-back. At Stiks, the children are doing very well.

Modern-day Michelangelo – Culture City :: SRQ Magazine article by Abby Weingarten

Italian artist Luca Mancini creates a mural of Leonardo da Vinci’s ‘The Annunciation’ on the ceiling of A Lake Club house

PHOTOGRAPH BY WYATT KOSTYGAN.

Dubbed a “modern-day Michelangelo” by his dedicated clientele, Luca Mancini an Italian artist– came to Lakewood Ranch in the winter for a jaw-dropping order. At the very beginning of January, Mancini painted a fresco of The Annunciation by Leonardo da Vinci on the ceiling of Mary Ann Cricchio’s Lake Club house. Cricchio, who guides small groups through the Amalfi Coast, Tuscany, Sicily and Venice with his agency, Da Mimmo Tours of Italy— discovered Mancini while living abroad. “I brought it here from Italy to my newly built house to reproduce a mural of The Annunciation on the ceiling of my large bedroom,” says Cricchio. “I realized that it is a phenomenon for my friends and neighbors. I believe it’s because they’re just not used to seeing something like this in the United States of America, especially in Lakewood Ranch. Mancini was the perfect artist to make it happen, says Cricchio. He was born in the province of Asti, Italy, and studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Turin. He has worked as a figurative painter and interior designer and over the past two decades has worked on projects in Turin, Milan, Liguria, the French Riviera and the Amalfi Coast.

Cricchio’s neighbors were absolutely amazed by Mancini’s rendering, she says. The Lake Club is one of Lakewood Ranch’s most exclusive villages – with custom estate residences inside the gated community –and Mancini’s art adds another level of luxury to Cricchio’s home. “My neighbors came to see him. I just think it’s so rare for Americans to see that,” Cricchio said. “I know Europeans see a lot of churches and palaces, but it’s really, really interesting to Americans here. Cricchio has lived at Lakewood Ranch for less than two years, having moved from Baltimore, Maryland. She moved to the area with her son, Mimmo, after selling the family’s Italian restaurant, Da Mimmo, in the Little Italy section of Baltimore. Mary Ann Cricchio moved into her new Lake Club home at the end of December 2021. Cricchio and her late husband, Domenico “Mimmo” Cricchio, were well known in Baltimore’s Little Italy community for decades. Their restaurant offered signature veal chops, and the area was famous for sending limos to bring diners to their tables. Da Mimmo has hosted many famous entertainers and sports legends, whose photographs lined the restaurant’s Roman Cocktail Lounge. Mary Ann Cricchio worked in the hospitality industry for 42 years and ran her restaurant for 36 years. She served as president of the Restaurant Association of Maryland and of Hospitality and Tourism for the State of Maryland. She served on the board of the National Restaurant Association and even represented the United States in an advisory capacity at the Beijing Olympic Committee prior to the 2008 Olympics. Her religion also figured prominently in her life. “I am a devout Roman Catholic and believe my faith has been the foundation of our strong family foundation for so many years, even after losing my husband (and Mimmo’s father) in 2003,” Cricchio says. “As such, the project of painting Leonardo da Vinci The Annunciation in my home is a way that I feel I honor God for all the blessings He has given us.

Mancini first painted for Cricchio in his summer residence on the Amalfi Coast in Italy; the commission was a representation of the Italian artist Michelangelo The Creation of Adam. Michelangelo’s original fresco, which forms part of the Sistine Chapel ceiling, was created between 1508 and 1512. It illustrates the biblical story of creation from the book of genesisin which God gives life to the first man, Adam. “I was very impressed with Luca’s work and his dedication to the job at hand,” Cricchio says of the painting. “It was a no-brainer to bring him to Lakewood Ranch so he could replicate another famous work for my home here.” The Annunciation project wrapped up in mid-February, before Mancini returned to Italy to complete a commission of the “14 Stations of the Cross,” Cricchio says. “It has been very exciting to experience the development of this mural daily with an artist of the caliber of Luca Mancini,” says Cricchio. “He created for me a memory of his development and a work of art in my home that will last for the rest of my life.”

But the piece’s significance goes even further than that of Cricchio, she says. The Annunciation was created by the Italian Renaissance artist da Vinci between 1472 and 1476. It depicts what was a popular biblical subject in 15th-century Florence: the angel Gabriel announcing to Mary that she would miraculously conceive and give birth to a son (to be named Jesus and called “the Son of God”). On his website, Mancini states that he investigated “intimate painting linked to the human soul” and that his paintings are characterized “by a rare realistic and poetic intensity”. This poetic intensity is evident in Mancini’s work at Cricchio’s Lakewood Ranch home – in an awe-inspiring piece that she and her family cherish.

Bareback Brave – SRQist :: SRQ Magazine Article by Dylan Campbell

Of all the Sarasota riders, one is the only one. He is both a relic and a young man – a living, breathing piece of history, a remnant of the city’s past as a circus town. Time, however, cannot contain him, and through the vigor of his conduct he brings the past into the future. However, it takes a lot to be this bridge between eras. It takes away your childhood, your chance to live a “normal” life. It takes your body, subjecting you to years of hard falls, broken bones and bruised skin. Mostly, perhaps, it takes your mind – it requires a willingness to trick your brain into doing the impossible, over and over again. Ermes Zamperla is a 7th generation circus rider, member of one of the only families in the world to maintain this riding tradition. He has been performing since the age of six, traveling the world and sharing the oldest form of circus with everyone. Returning to a memory that still makes him laugh, Ermes recalls a show in the Montreal area when he was young with the Tarzan Zerbini circus. His role was to pose as a member of the public before rushing onto the circus ring just as his brother Gino finished his number with the ponies. “I remember going for a run in the ring and then being grabbed by this fat French-Canadian security guard. Since he didn’t speak English, someone had to tell him that I was on the show. I thought I had so many problems. Now approaching 30, Ermes has amassed a wealth of experience, including touring with the Ringling Bros. and working as a stuntman and horse trainer for AMC’s hit zombie apocalypse series, The Walking Dead.

ERMES DEFIES THE GRAVITY OF HIS HORSE TOP, MURDOCK, AN AMERICAN CROSS QUARTER HORSE COLOR GRULLA

The Ermes family and their equestrian heritage originated in Italy, where the style of bareback circus riding was born. In the golden days of the circus, the name Zamperla was synonymous with bareback riding. “We are definitely the last of a dying breed in terms of standing on the backs of horses, in the United States we are the last family to do that. Even in Europe, not many people do it. Due to the immense difficulty of the craft, many other families abandoned the tradition. It’s a skill it took a lifetime for Ermes, the youngest of four brothers, to master. “Ever since I can remember, we had been touring, training horses and moving around. As a child, it was very difficult to keep friends and make new ones, when you travel through Europe or South America eight months a year. On tour, Ermes’ work ranges from horse shows to Renaissance festivals and of course circuses. While everything he does falls under the general term of equestrian circus riding, his art includes distinct styles with different heritages. At Renaissance festivals, Ermes often participates in both jousting and Roman equitation – an act where he stands on two horses at once. At equestrian and circus exhibitions, Ermes will showcase its expertise in bareback circus riding and Cossack riding, two distinct forms of riding. Circus bareback riding involves performing flips and stunts from the top of the horse. Cossack riding – a discipline originating from the Russian cavalry and which is the basis of modern competitive jumping – includes a special saddle that allows Ermes to perform tricks at high speed. These tricks include “under the belly” where, from the top of the saddle, Ermes will climb under the horse and back up to the other side. “It demands so much of the horse and the human – you have to be an acrobat as well as having a real connection with the horses,” says Ermes. Sounds dangerous? It is because it is.

“I love the speed, the danger and how much it takes to believe in yourself to pull off those stunts. It doesn’t matter if you’ve done it a thousand times, every show is different. Every audience is different. I can feel that fear before I go up in the ring, but as soon as the curtain opens, it all goes away. There’s just complete silence. The ability to conquer that fear, however, is what drives Ermes to put his body in danger time and time again. That doesn’t mean the adrenaline rush is free.Ermes recounts a series of shows he performed at a large bullring in Toronto, where his horse Murdock, a grulla-colored American Quarter Horse Cross who stands 15’2 hands, had the chance to acquire unusual speed while Ermes played “under the belly”. “Because the arena was so big, Murdock could really reach with his legs and build up more speed than usual. At the end of each show, my sides were black and blue because he was reaching and kicking me. with the back of his legs. That’s why I would say that I didn’t perform in seven shows, I “survived” seven shows.

For Ermes, whose stable includes the now 16-year-old Murdock and a trio of other horses, the degree of trust between horse and rider needed to perform death-defying stunts in front of a sold-out arena far exceeds the parameters of the typical horse-owner relationship. It’s more like the bond between fighter pilot and co-pilot or rally car driver and navigator – a partnership forged in danger in the pursuit of glory. Their partnership is indicative of the special relationship many actors in the circus and performing arts community have with their animals. By cultivating an understanding of her connection to Murdock, Ermes hopes to dispel the negative connotations the outside world often has of people who work with animals. “We will communicate through a look he gives me before throwing a trick. If I fall, it stops. If I’m in bad weather, he takes care of me. I’ve been through so much with Murdock, from taking him around the world to performing in front of hundreds of people, that our relationship is indescribable. We have incredible trust in each other and a level of connection that most people can’t fathom. said Ermes. For Ermes and Murdock, however, this bond was not built overnight. “I don’t think he had had very good experiences before he was in my hands – sometimes I wasn’t sure if I would get Dr Jekyll or Mr Hyde,” Ermes says. “It took us a while to trust each other, but he kept trying for me. It took three years, but eventually he became my best horse.

When not on tour, Ermes helps others train and work with problem horses. A horse, a wild California Mustang, which had landed two people at the hospital, left a special mark on him. “After a few weeks I thought I had made really good progress, but when I galloped him past his owner, he pushed my back. A week later his owner called me and told me that her husband had been injured on the job and they couldn’t afford to keep him anymore – I was faced with the choice of taking the horse or see him go to the pound.

Unable to live with this blood on his hands, Ermes adopted the horse and named it Agi – short for Agrios which means “savage” in Greek. Because Ermes’ stable is so talented, he was able to take his time coaching Agi. After two years, Agi became disciplined enough to perform in shows with Ermes. However, Agi was never destined for a life in the circus and was gifted to Ermes’ girlfriend, Amanda, who gives Agi a future as a jumping horse.

This same love for horses has also inspired Ermes to groom the next generation of riders locally through a bareback circus riding clinic at the Rosaire Riding Academy last January to spark interest in the discipline and to inspire trust. The one-day clinic was open to riders of all skill levels ages eight and up. The motivation for this came last summer when Ermes, sidelined with a torn ACL, was helping Ellian Rosaire at the Academy’s summer camp.

“I see so many kids quit when they get into awkward positions with a horse. I told Ellian I just wanted to help these kids gain confidence and not be such a victim of their own journey. The goal of the clinic has never been to create the best trick rider in the world – that, as seen in Ermes, takes a lifetime of lessons. “I want children to understand how to be the aggressor and not the victim when they find themselves in an awkward position. How not to give up when your horse is in trouble or afraid of something. How not to panic in the face of a tricky situation. Circus bareback and stunts are all about having tremendous determination and confidence. By learning this, I hoped to instill those same values ​​in these young riders.

For all the work Ermes takes – the time on the road, his chance to have a normal childhood, and the wear and tear on his body – it gives him more in return. It gives him peace. It gives him a purpose. More importantly, it gives him a path, different from the rest of the world, paving the way for anyone who dares to follow him.

Think inside the box – Forage :: SRQ Magazine article by Andrew Fabian

Nikki Lum-Kleiber and David Kleiber carry the torch of a family restaurant into the future. Photograph by Wyatt Kostygan

It’s hard to imagine a more loaded question than “what do you want to be when you grow up?” Parents want their children to climb the mythical ladder of upward mobility, believing that their children’s lives will be easier and more fulfilled if they could simply follow the advice of their dear mom and dad. This is especially true in the restaurant industry, where nights, weekends and holidays offer less than a quarter of the work of a hot kitchen. What if the family restaurant was already successful? And if the children felt at home there? What if they had some exciting new ideas to move the restaurant forward into the future? These questions are answered at Stiks.

THE FRESH ROLL SHRIMP IS BRIGHT AND DENSE, WITH A NICE ACCENT OF MINT COMPLEMENTING THE PEANUT SAUCE

Occupying the former A Taste of Asia space on Tamiami Trail, owned and operated by Lam and Selina Lum for over a decade, Stiks is the freshly updated concept of daughter Nikki Lum-Kleiber and son-in-law David Kleiber. Rather than completely reinventing the menu, the budding married couple turned it into a set of brighter, healthier and customizable offerings loaded with gluten-free, vegan and vegetarian options. What they’ve reinvented is the way food is delivered, adopting a fast-casual model to go along with the hip decor that makes the space feel more like an airy lounge than a sit-down restaurant. .

THE LAO CURRY NOODLE SOUP THAT PUT A TASTE OF ASIA ON THE MAP IS RETURNING AS A CUSTOMIZABLE DISH THAT NOW COMES AS A VEGAN OPTION.

The most pressing concern for anyone savvy enough to have incorporated A Taste of Asia’s Lao Curry Noodle Soup into their cooking routine is whether or not the dish has disappeared into the modernized concept. Don’t worry: the soup stays. “It was by far one of the most popular dishes on A Taste of Asia,” says Lum-Kleiber, “so there was no way to get rid of it.” Brimming with aromas of lemongrass, the coconut milk broth has enough of the homemade red curry base to excite the taste buds with a smooth, well-balanced heat. Scallions and cilantro enhance the earthy tones, while rice noodles, bean sprouts and purple cabbage fill it up in a hearty bowl of everything delicious from Southeast Asian cuisines. Stiks has made a smart addition to Lum’s original preparation though, offering both a vegan version (with vegetable broth) and a non-vegan version (with chicken broth). To top it off, diners choose between meat protein, vegan protein, or shrimp.

Sweet Potato Glass Noodles provide a starchy base for the delicious taste of wok-fried scallions.

GLASS SWEET POTATO NOODLES PROVIDE A STARCHY BASE FOR THE DELICIOUS FLAVOR OF WOK SAMPLES.

For noodle lovers, a wonderful Pad Thai offers something familiar and perfectly acceptable when you don’t want to get bogged down in all the delicious permutations available on the menu. Sweet potato noodles, on the other hand, are more like an event. Thin sweet potato glass noodles – so called because of their transparency – are sautéed with onion, scallion, cilantro and bean sprouts, along with dinner’s choice of protein. The aroma itself immediately whets the appetite, a characteristic of seared onion that seems almost as paramount as grilled meat. Dense and hearty, the noodles alone add a lot of weight to the dish, which seems at odds with the small take-out container it comes in. But, when buying anything other than soup, Stiks offers the option of small fried chicken pieces as an add-on. Rest assured, no meat is needed for this meal to split, but it is freshly fried chicken.

A revamped modern space invites a new wave of foodies seeking modern Southeast Asian cuisine.

A RENOVATED MODERN SPACE INVITES A NEW WAVE OF GOURMETS IN SEARCH OF MODERN SOUTHEAST ASIAN CUISINE.

A nam sod chicken is about as bright and energetic as a top 40 on the charts. Made with diced chicken, julienned ginger, onion strips, scallions, peanuts and cilantro, the entire collection of chunks are tossed in a zesty, flavorful mix of lime juice and sauce of fish. Similar in flavor profile to Peruvian ceviche, this fresh and perky meal leaves a lingering fullness due to its high protein composition. Likewise, the fresh shrimp roll packs a lot of bright flavor into a seemingly small dish that belies his long sense of accomplishment. This luminosity mainly comes from the fresh mint leaves inside the sticky rice paper, while the prolonged feeling of satiety comes from the shrimp and rice noodles inside.

Stiks, 4413 S Tamiami Trl., Sarasota, 941-923-2742, tasteofasiasarasota.com, @stikssarasota

STIKS, 4413 S TAMIAMI TRL., SARASOTA, 941-923-2742, TASTEOFASIASARASOTA.COM, @STIKSSARASOTA

But, if one dish really exemplifies how young restaurateurs have found ways to freshen up age-old dishes, it’s Orange Chicken and Orange Tofu. Listed in the “sweet and sticky” section of the menu, fried chicken pieces or fried tofu cubes are tossed in an orange sauce that bursts with real orange flavor (the Kleibers use copious amounts of zest orange) while retaining that familiar stickiness that makes some sauces a guilty pleasure. Of course, it’s also nice to bite into a piece of lightly breaded chicken at Stiks and immediately go for the meat rather than wondering if the piece is really just a piece of breadcrumbs like in a lot of joints. . take away.

For a sweet and fresh treat, Stiks offers an assortment of Southeast Asian staples like Thai iced tea and boba. Taro boba, purple and silky as a satin pillowcase, tastes like cereal milk infused with an earthy electrolyte drink, a combination that sounds odd on paper but is a joy in practice. A brown sugar black tea boba, however, is truly exceptional. The combination of caramelized sugar with the slight bitterness of black tea makes this boba a textbook case of how to mix opposites. While it helps that both flavors reside in a rich, creamy base, it’s still a nifty invention with beautiful results.

Returning to the original set of questions, we find optimism and promise. As the Lums pass on their heritage to a second generation, the familiar flavors remain. But those flavors have been adapted to the modern fixation on dietary designations and clean eating, as well as the “new normal” requirement that a restaurant be nimble, adaptable, fast-paced and laid-back. At Stiks, the children are doing very well.

Two potentiometers on a digital input

By applying FM and PWM simultaneously, it is possible to transmit two data signals on a single carrier. In this video we will connect two potentiometers on a single wire to a digital microcontroller input and read the position of both.

To read the position of potentiometers or other analog values ​​with a digital device like a microcontroller, you need some kind of analog-to-digital converter or ADC. Even though many microcontrollers have an ADC device built in, they tend to have more digital I/O pins than analog. Therefore, depending on the application, of course, you might want to save the analog inputs for something more important than managing a user interface, and use digital inputs instead.

By applying frequency modulation (FM) and pulse width modulation (PWM) at the same time, it is possible to transmit two data signals on one carrier.

Adjust frequency and pulse width with potentiometers

We will take advantage of the independence between duty cycle and frequency of a PWM signal to transfer the position of two potentiometers with a single rectangular wave. One potentiometer controls the frequency and the other the duty cycle. The microcontroller measures the frequency of the rectangular wave and its duty cycle. It then converts these values ​​back to potentiometer positions in a range of, for example, 0 to 100.

The circuit we use is a classic triangle generator based on an operational amplifier with a comparator. With the given component values, the frequency is adjustable from 250 Hz to 500 Hz. The pulse is adjustable from 10% up to 90%. In fact, you can use any circuit that can modulate frequency and pulse width with potentiometers.

In this video we are going to connect two potentiometers on a single wire to a digital microcontroller input. We can read the position of both through FM and PWM of the input signal.

Resources

Chelsea Green in talks with Adultery magazine for digital content

Chelsea Green was released from WWE in April 2021, which was just the start of a string of releases, throughout the year. It was a blessing in disguise for the Canadian wrestler who literally sat in the back of WWE NXT despite being able to release new stuff and having a huge fan following on social media.

For those unaware, Chelsea Green is a bikini specialist in her own right who has the least inhibitions with her body. She’s already had a few fun photoshoots on behalf of Calendar Gurls Canada to give her fans a swimsuit calendar. A few weeks ago, her cover photo for the magazine in an unzipped leather jacket and black underwear went viral on Twitter and Instagram.

Ex-WWE Smackdown Star Toni Storm Leaves Fans Speechless With New Look

In a recent episode of her Podcast “Very jealousy”, Chelsea Green has revealed that she is in talks with an outlet so that her podcast can grow further. She also said she was about to sign a deal with Playboy magazine for digital content. In the meantime, she’s warning her fans not to get too excited as it won’t be a full photoshoot,

“I’m in talks with Playboy again for some fun stuff. So we kind of progressed our conversations to a bit more serious stuff. Now, this is not a photo shoot. So don’t get too excited. But that’s digital stuff. It’s really fun. I’m so excited for this.

AEW Dynamite: The former WWE Champion’s tag team; Will the NXT legend return to action?

Chelsea Green wants to achieve a lot after leaving WWE

Following her release from WWE, Chelsea Green has been very open about her to-do list and one of her desires is to bond with Playboy and make a big difference. She previously gave auditions for Adultery magazine and shared her experiences. However, she didn’t make it to the final cut, of course.

Ex-WWE NXT Star In Talks With Adultery Magazine For Digital Content 2

We’re guessing Chelsea Green won’t have much trouble getting into a Playboy shoot given that she’s no longer with WWE and therefore won’t have to take any clearance to do so. The popular adult magazine is pretty picky and their last pro wrestling star was Maria Kanellis nine years ago.

Chelsea Green fans will let Playboy know their wishes on social media once and hopefully the former NXT superstar can get his wish, after all. For now, she just has to keep the project a secret, but as soon as something happens, the former Hot Mess has promised to let her fans know.

Can a 40-year-old magazine article stop America’s crime wave? – AMAC



AMAC Exclusive – By Andrew Abbott

As news of violence in Ukraine has dominated the headlines in recent days, American cities are also witnessing horrific acts of violence – not from a foreign military, but from criminals empowered by politicians. and soft-on-crime Democrat movements like “Defund the Police.” After murder and burglary rates in many major U.S. cities hit all-time highs last year, many city leaders are desperate to quell the violence and unrest, but rather than sweeping progressive visions of “reform of criminal justice,” policymakers might be better off looking at successful strategies from the last time crime rose in the United States.

One such strategy was sketched out in a seemingly innocuous article in Atlantic in March 1982 – 40 years ago this month – entitled “Broken Windows: The Police and Neighborhood Safety”. Unbeknownst to the authors, this article would become one of the most controversial, misunderstood, calamitous, but ultimately successful theories on public safety in recent history. Proponents say it was the theory that saved New York City, while critics say it unfairly targeted millions of economically disadvantaged Americans. Yet almost all of these criticisms are noticeably divorced from what the authors of the “broken windows” approach to policing actually advocated.

The article was written by social scientists James Q. Wilson and George L. Kelling. Both were academics, but Wilson would later significantly influence public policy. Contrary to popular belief, however, they did not create the “broken window theory” themselves. The theory was first proposed and tested by Stanford psychologist Philip Zimbardo.

In 1969, Zimbardo placed identical cars on the street, one in high-income Palo Alto and the other in low-income Bronx, which appeared abandoned. Within a day, the vehicle in the Bronx was vandalized, stripped of parts and destroyed. The vehicle in Palo Alto remained intact for nearly a week until Zimbardo smashed part of it with a hammer. Within a day, the car was destroyed in the same way. He went on to hypothesize that “vandalism can occur anywhere once community barriers – feelings of mutual respect and obligations of civility – are lowered by actions that seem to signal that ‘nobody is getting away’. cares “”.

Wilson and Kelling would later expand on Zimbardo’s work, adding that “disorder and crime are usually inextricably linked in some kind of sequence of development”. When something falls into a state of disrepair and disarray, according to their argument, other objects around that original something quickly follow: “if a window in a building is broken and not repaired, all other windows will soon be broken. ” It’s important to note that “this is as true in upscale neighborhoods as it is in run-down areas…an unrepaired broken window is a signal that no one cares, and so breaking more windows costs nothing” .

This situation in turn leads to a general degradation of the community as a whole. As Wilson and Kelling describe it, “A property is abandoned, weeds grow, a window is broken. The adults stop scolding the rambunctious children; the children, emboldened, become more rowdy. Families are moving, single adults are moving in. Teenagers gather in front of the convenience store. The merchant asks them to move; They refuse. Fights occur. Waste accumulates. Then, as families abandon an area and residents stop caring, crime sets in.

Liberals past and present have been quick to assert that the “broken windows” theory is an unfair criticism of poor and minority communities. They claim that he portrays all disadvantaged individuals as criminals.

Contrary to this claim, however, Wilson and Kelling do not argue that this breakdown by itself leads to spikes in violent crime. Rather, crime will take hold because people will lose their connection to each other and to the neighborhood as a whole. Their argument is not that people who already live in a certain area turn to crime once the social fabric breaks down; it is that a “criminal invasion” is more likely to occur in areas where the social fabric has deteriorated.

Importantly and immediately relevant to the situation in many American cities today, Wilson and Kelling offer two fundamental solutions to these problems. The first is aggressive campaigns for public cleanliness and the upkeep of the city. By keeping communities clean and windows intact, leaders can safeguard the collective health of the community.

The second is a reinvigoration of the “walking beat” cop. The benefit of cops regularly patrolling certain areas is twofold. The first is the well-documented effect they have on the sense of public safety in a community. The more people feel safe to engage with their community, the more people will actually engage with their community, thereby protecting and nurturing the social fabric.

The second benefit is that beat cops are effective in confronting and deterring “low level” criminal activity. While that doesn’t mean cops have to stop anyone loitering, strolling, or skateboarding where they shouldn’t, it does mean cops can “enforce rules about smoking, drinking, disorderly behavior , etc The need for execution involves nothing more than the deportation of the offender.

When cops are present and visible, they can deter this behavior before it turns into more brazen and violent criminal acts. The authors of “Broken Windows” admit that the highest duty of all police officers is to be “crime fighters” and to “respond to calls”. Yet they maintain that it is equally crucial for the police to protect communities: “public drunkenness, street prostitution and pornographic exhibitions can destroy a community faster than any professional burglary team”.

Forty years later, the coronavirus pandemic seems to have confirmed the broken windows argument. As a result of government-mandated shutdowns, millions of Americans say they feel “alienated” from their fellow citizens and feel the social fabric of their local communities has completely crumbled. In several cities, homeless encampments have overtaken large parts of public squares, parks and even beaches. Many of the city’s district attorneys have pledged not to prosecute crimes they consider “victimless,” including armed robbery, prostitution and drug use. Democratic “open borders” policies also allowed career criminals who crossed the southern border illegally to stay in the United States rather than be deported. Finally, the “Defund the Police” movement has directly led to personnel issues for many police departments. All of these factors have likely contributed to the surge in violent crime currently underway in American cities.

For Wilson and Kelling, “Broken Windows Law Enforcement” asserts that police, local governments, and local citizens should work to protect communities as much as they work to protect individuals. That, “just as doctors now recognize the importance of promoting health rather than just treating disease, the police – and all of us – must recognize the importance of maintaining intact communities without broken windows.”

After all, it is the people who actually live in crime-ridden communities – not the left-wing activists who occupy them at every opportunity – who have the most to lose from rampant crime. Rather than implementing woke social policies or slashing police budgets, progressive politicians might be better served by instead focusing on traditional notions of what community means and taking small but vital steps. to make America’s cities cleaner and safer.

Andrew Abbott is the pseudonym of a writer and public affairs consultant with more than a decade of experience in DC at the intersection of politics and culture.   








We hope you enjoyed this article. While you’re here, we have a small favor to ask of you…

Support the AMAC action. Our 501(C)(4) advances initiatives on Capitol Hill, in state legislatures, and at the local level to protect American values, free speech, the exercise of religion, equal opportunity, the sanctity of life and the rule of law.

Donate now







If you like articles like this – Subscribe to AMAC’s daily newsletter
and download the AMAC News app

Register today Download


If you like articles like this, subscribe to AMAC’s daily newsletter!










Can a 40-year-old magazine article stop America’s crime wave? – AMAC

AMAC Exclusive – By Andrew Abbott

While reports of violence in Ukraine have dominated the headlines in recent days, American cities are also witnessing horrific acts of violence – not from a foreign army, but from criminals empowered by politicians. . and soft-on-crime Democratic movements like “Defund the Police.” After murder and burglary rates in many major US cities hit all-time highs last year, many city leaders are desperate to quell the violence and unrest, but rather than sweep away progressive visions of “criminal justice reform,” policymakers might be better off looking to successful strategies from the last time crime rose in the United States.

Such a strategy was sketched out in a seemingly innocuous article in Atlantic in March 1982 – 40 years ago this month – entitled “Broken Windows: The Police and Neighborhood Safety”. Unbeknownst to the authors, this article would become one of the most controversial, misunderstood, calamitous, but ultimately successful theories on public safety in recent history. Proponents say it was the theory that saved New York City, while critics say it unfairly targeted millions of economically disadvantaged Americans. Yet almost all of these criticisms are significantly removed from what the authors of the “broken windows” approach to policing actually advocated.

The article was written by social scientists James Q. Wilson and George L. Kelling. Both were academics, but Wilson would later significantly influence public policy. Contrary to popular belief, however, they did not create the “broken window theory” themselves. The theory was first proposed and tested by Stanford psychologist Philip Zimbardo.

In 1969, Zimbardo placed identical cars on the street, one in high-income Palo Alto and the other in the low-income Bronx, which seemed abandoned. Within a day, the vehicle in the Bronx was vandalized, stripped of parts and destroyed. The vehicle in Palo Alto remained intact for nearly a week until Zimbardo smashed part of it with a hammer. Within a day, the car was destroyed in the same way. He went on to hypothesize that “vandalism can occur anywhere once community barriers – feelings of mutual respect and obligations of civility – are lowered by actions that appear to signal that ‘no one is ‘flee’. is concerned “”.

Wilson and Kelling would later expand on Zimbardo’s work, adding that “disorder and crime are usually inextricably linked in some sort of sequence of development”. When something falls into a state of disrepair and disorder, according to their argument, other objects around that original something quickly follow: “If a window in a building is broken and not repaired, all other windows will be soon broken. It’s important to note that “this is as true in uptown as it is in run-down areas…an unrepaired broken window is a signal that no one cares, and so breaking more windows costs nothing.”

This situation in turn leads to a general degradation of the community as a whole. As Wilson and Kelling describe it, “A property is abandoned, weeds grow, a window is broken. The adults stop scolding the exuberant children; the children, emboldened, become more rowdy. Families are moving, single adults are moving in. Teenagers gather in front of the convenience store. The merchant asks them to move; They refuse. Fights occur. Waste accumulates. Then, as families abandon an area and residents stop caring, crime sets in.

Liberals past and present have been quick to assert that the “broken windows” theory is an unfair criticism of poor and minority communities. They claim that he portrays all disadvantaged individuals as criminals.

Contrary to this claim, however, Wilson and Kelling do not claim that this venting by itself leads to spikes in violent crime. Rather, crime will take hold because people will lose their connection to each other and to the neighborhood as a whole. Their argument is not that people who already live in a certain area turn to crime once the social fabric breaks down; it is that a “criminal invasion” is more likely to occur in areas where the social fabric has deteriorated.

Importantly and immediately relevant to the situation in many American cities today, Wilson and Kelling offer two basic solutions to these problems. The first is aggressive campaigns for public cleanliness and the upkeep of the city. By keeping communities clean and windows intact, leaders can safeguard the collective health of the community.

The second is a reinvigoration of the “walking beat” cop. The benefit of cops regularly patrolling certain areas is twofold. The first is the well-documented effect they have on the sense of public safety in a community. The more people feel safe to engage with their community, the more people will actually engage with their community, thereby protecting and nurturing the social fabric.

The second benefit is that beat cops are effective in confronting and deterring “low level” criminal activity. While that doesn’t mean cops should stop anyone from loitering, strolling, or skateboarding where they shouldn’t, it does mean cops can “enforce rules about smoking, drinking, disorderly behavior, etc. The need for execution involves nothing more than the deportation of the offender.

When cops are present and visible, they can deter this behavior before it turns into more brazen and violent criminal acts. The authors of “Broken Windows” admit that the highest duty of all police officers is to be “crime fighters” and to “respond to calls”. Yet they argue that it is just as crucial for the police to protect communities: “public drunkenness, street prostitution and pornographic exhibitions can destroy a community faster than any professional burglary team”.

Forty years later, the coronavirus pandemic seems to have confirmed the broken window argument. As a result of government-mandated shutdowns, millions of Americans say they feel “alienated” from their fellow citizens and feel the social fabric of their local communities has completely crumbled. In several cities, homeless encampments have taken over large parts of public squares, parks and even beaches. Many of the city’s district attorneys have pledged not to prosecute crimes they consider “victimless,” including armed robbery, prostitution and drug use. Democratic “open borders” policies also allowed career criminals who crossed the southern border illegally to stay in the United States rather than be deported. Finally, the “Defund the Police” movement has directly led to personnel issues for many police departments. All of these factors have likely contributed to the increase in violent crime currently taking place in American cities.

For Wilson and Kelling, “Broken Windows Law Enforcement” asserts that police, local governments, and local citizens should work to protect communities as much as they work to protect individuals. That, “just as doctors now recognize the importance of promoting health rather than just treating disease, the police – and all of us – must recognize the importance of maintaining intact communities without broken windows.”

After all, it is the people who actually live in crime-ridden communities – not the left-wing activists who occupy them at every turn – who have the most to lose from rampant crime. Rather than implementing woke social policies or cutting police budgets, progressive politicians might be better served by instead focusing on traditional notions of what community means and taking small but vital steps. to make America’s cities cleaner and safer.

Andrew Abbott is the pseudonym of a writer and public affairs consultant with more than a decade of experience in DC at the intersection of politics and culture.   


We hope you enjoyed this article. While you’re here, we have a small favor to ask of you…

Support the AMAC action. Our 501(C)(4) advances initiatives on Capitol Hill, in state legislatures, and at the local level to protect American values, free speech, the exercise of religion, equal opportunity, the sanctity of life and the rule of law.

Donate now


If you like articles like this – Subscribe to AMAC’s daily newsletter
and download the AMAC News app

Register today Download

If you like articles like this, subscribe to AMAC’s daily newsletter!


Hours after being released on bail, J&K journalist Fahad Shah arrested for the third time

Hours after being released on bail by a Shopian court and days after securing bail from a special court, journalist Fahad Shah was arrested for the third time in a month on Saturday evening. The most recent arrest, by Srinagar police, relates to a case regarding his magazine’s reporting of an encounter in the city in May 2020.

According to a statement from the magazine, while granting bail to Fahad, Magistrate Shopian Sayeem Qayoom noted, “In a barbaric society you can hardly ask for bail, in a civilized society you can hardly refuse it. In other words, “surety is the rule and its refusal is the exception”.

Shah, the editor of the online news magazine “thekashmirwalla”, was arrested on February 4 this year by Pulwama police. He was released on bail by a special court under NIA law after 22 days in detention on February 26. He was subsequently arrested by Shopian police and released on bail on Saturday.

Currently, he is housed at Safakadal Police Station in Srinagar and his lawyer is about to apply for bail again.

In a statement, the Jammu and Kashmir Police noted that journalist Fahad Shah was wanted in three cases for “glorifying terrorism, spreading false news and inciting the general public to create public order situations”.

The 33-year-old was arrested for social media posts “amounting to glorifying terrorist activity and damaging the image of law enforcement in addition to causing ill will and disaffection against the country”.

The arrest in Shopian, on the heels of his first bail, came in a case filed by the military against two news portals, including “thekashmirwalla” under Sections 153 (provocation with intent to riot ) and 505 (statements conducive to public mischief) of the Indian Penal Code in January last year. This follows a report in the magazine alleging that a local army unit “forced an Islamic seminary to hold Republic Day celebrations on January 26” in Shopian.

Meanwhile, a third FIR has been filed at Pulwama Police Station after Shah magazine published an article quoting family members of one of the deceased activists denying police allegations. Police had disputed the claims made in the report.

French research lab develops unique new screen material

A team of scientists from a French public research laboratory has developed a new material that can be used as a screen on devices such as mobile phones and televisions.

Based in Caen, the CRISMAT laboratory is associated with the University of Caen Normandy, CNRS and ENSICAEN. Led by Wilfrid Prellier, director of the CRISMAT laboratory, the team including senior researchers Ulrike Lüders and Arnaud Fouchet, developed SrVO3, a thin film intended for use in electronic applications.

Strong electronic correlations and optical transparency

Wilfrid explained:

“SrVO3 is a perovskite oxide, being a transparent metallic conductor. Unlike other transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), this material exhibits a much higher charge density, in the range of metallic conductors, with strong electronic correlations, leading to optical transparency.

The strength of SrVO3 over other TCOs is that it does not use indium and still maintains high electronic conduction. The most effective TCO known to date is ITO (Indium-Tin-Oxide Sn:In2O3), widely used in electronics. However, indium is a rare element, the availability of which is restricted. Prices therefore fluctuate strongly and durability is limited.

“In SrVO3, only widely available elements are used, and compared to other indium-free TCOs (like Al:ZnO or F:SnO2), the electronic conductivity is greater. Therefore, SrVO3 appears to be an extremely promising material for replace ITO in many applications.

SrVO3 is a perovskite oxide, being a transparent metallic conductor. (CRISMAT laboratory)

SrVO3 must be crystalline to be conductive, and until now its crystal growth was known only on suitable surfaces, mainly other perovskite oxide single crystals like SrTiO3 or LaAlO3.

Wilfrid added:

“Direct growth on Si or glass was not feasible due to structural and chemical incompatibility. Our work demonstrated that this material can be grown on virtually any surface using oxide nanosheets as seed layer These nanosheets can be deposited by chemical solution methods on a wide range of surfaces or on devices, allowing the integration of SrVO3.

Applications on smartphone screens

TCOs are needed in a wide range of applications, and particularly in those where an electrical connection must be combined with optical transparency.

For touch screens, like on smartphone screens, the finger makes local electrical contact, allowing the system to interpret the position of the finger. At the same time, the electrode on the screen used to detect this electrical contact by the finger must be optically transparent in order to transmit to the user the visual information displayed on the screen.

Other applications of the material could be heating the front windows of cars. With transparent conductors, the same techniques as for the rear window, using conductor wires with resistive heating, could be used without the visual effect of the wires.

Wilfred said:

“TCOs also often have interesting behavior in the infrared wavelengths for heat management, but we have not looked at the infrared properties of SrVO3 so far. Regardless of the TCO character, SrVO3 also has a threshold very low electron emission, which can also be interesting for certain applications for electron guns, but more generally for the alignment of energy bands in devices.

The lab is currently seeking industrial partners interested in developing commercial products using SrVO3, such as phone manufacturers, to bring the material to market.

Never-before-seen content by JRR Tolkien released on the official website

The Estate of JRR Tolkien has released some never-before-seen content in an update to their official website.

The relaunched site now features draft manuscripts, paintings and photographs by the fantasy author and many of his family members.

It also includes sections on Tolkien’s calligraphy, letters and timeline of his life, and audio recordings and video clips featuring Tolkien and his son Christopher.

Christopher was an academic who edited much of his father’s posthumously published work and drew the original maps for the Lord of the Rings books.

Conversation with Smaug (The Tolkien Estate Limited)

He died in 2020.

The date of the relaunch is significant in the world of The Lord of the Rings as February 26, 3019 sees the rift of fellowship as Frodo and Sam begin their journey to Mordor and the death of Boromir.

Tolkien wrote the fantasy series The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings and also worked as a poet, philologist and scholar during his lifetime.

JRR Tolkien at his desk in Oxford in 1937 (The Tolkien Trust)

He died on September 2, 1973.

The Lord of the Rings has been translated into 36 languages ​​and is one of the best-selling books of all time, with over 100 million copies sold.

It has also been adapted into a film trilogy directed by Peter Jackson.

The official Tolkien Estate website provides information about the author’s literary and artistic works, as well as insight into his personal life.

Sight Magazine – Cambodia: Internet gateway raises fears of Chinese-style surveillance

Thomson Reuters Foundation

Sovann Chhay was 16 when he was arrested in the Cambodian capital last year for writing comments on the Telegram messaging app deemed insulting to government officials. The autistic teenager was imprisoned for almost six months.

He was among at least 35 people arrested for their online activity in Cambodia last year, according to the Cambodian Center for Human Rights, which expects the numbers to rise after the launch of a new chinese style internet gateway.

A street in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. PICTURE: Vanna Phon/Unsplash

All Internet traffic in Cambodia will be routed through the government-run National Internet Gateway, allowing authorities to monitor online activity, intercept and censor digital communications, and collect users’ personal data.

The gateway was due to launch last Wednesday, but on the eve of the planned rollout, a spokesperson for the Ministry of Telecommunications told reporters that it had been delayed due to disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. He did not give a new timetable.

“It threatens to restrict freedom of expression, access to information and the right to privacy in Cambodia, and gives the government unprecedented authority to monitor and control all internet traffic in the country.”

– Naly Pilorge, deputy director of LICADHO, a human rights organization.

Critics say when implemented, the gateway will further undermine privacy and hamper the work of human rights defenders as the government faces international criticism over a crackdown that has decimated civil society and the opposition.

“It threatens to restrict freedom of expression, access to information and the right to privacy in Cambodia, and gives the government unprecedented authority to monitor and control all internet traffic in the country,” he said. said Naly Pilorge, deputy director of LICADHO, a human rights organization.

“It will become one more tool in the authorities’ arsenal to suppress freedom of expression on the internet. There is no oversight or review of actions, allowing arbitrary censorship of the internet,” she said. to the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

A government spokesperson did not respond to requests for comment, but authorities previously said the gateway is essential for “peace and security” in the country, and dismissed concerns about censorship.

Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen

Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen attends a celebration marking the country’s 66th anniversary of independence from France, in central Phnom Penh, Cambodia November 9, 2019. PHOTO: Reuters/Samrang Pring /file photo.

From Cambodia to Indonesia and India, countries across Asia have introduced a slew of internet and data usage laws in recent years that human rights groups say increase the risk of mass surveillance and violations of freedom of expression.

Critics of Cambodia’s internet gateway, which is similar to that deployed by its close economic ally China, fear it could be used by longtime leader Hun Sen to curb dissent ahead of this year’s communal elections and national elections scheduled for 2023.

The New Internet Gateway Decree requires all service providers to register users with their correct identities. It will also allow authorities to arbitrarily disable internet access or block certain websites or domains.

State regulators will have the power to “prevent and disconnect all network connections that affect national income, security, social order, morals, culture, traditions and customs,” according to the executive order. .



With such a broad mandate, the gateway will facilitate “mass surveillance”, said Sopheap Chak, executive director of nonprofit CCHR.

“The timing of its establishment is of particular concern in the run-up to elections,” she said. “There is a real risk that it will be used to block and censor dissenting opinions online, hampering the ability of Cambodian citizens to make an informed choice,” she said. added.

A cybercrime bill unveiled in 2020 had already raised concerns on the increased surveillance of Internet users and the limitation of privacy and freedom of expression online.

The bill, which authorities at the time said was intended to ‘protect security and public order’, provides for prison terms for statements that have a ‘adverse effect’ on national security or public health , security, finance and civil servants.

Long before the Cybercrime Bill or the National Internet Gateway, activists and rights groups in Cambodia used coded language and encrypted apps to communicate on online messaging platforms to evade surveillance. governmental.

Still, at least 24 people were arrested for their online activity between April and December 2020, according to data compiled by the CCDH.

CCHR “has always had to be careful in its communications and only uses secure communication channels,” Sopheap Chak said, adding that it “will try to ensure its communications are secure” even with the new gateway.

Phnom Penh police in Cambodia

Police officers stand guard outside the Supreme Court in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, November 16, 2017. PHOTO: Reuters/Samrang Pring.

For activists, the front door is another hurdle to overcome, said Alejandro Gonzalez-Davidson, founder of Mother Nature Cambodia, an environmental advocacy group whose members have been repeatedly arrested for their whistleblowing.

“The level of care will need to increase, for example when using devices and communication methods known to pose a risk of state infiltration,” said Gonzalez-Davidson, who was kicked out of the country in 2015 for his activism.

“We are constantly adapting to the changing status quo and are constantly learning new techniques to stay safe. The more careful you have to be, the more energy is drained from activities aimed at opposing the regime,” he said. he adds.

Sight Subscriber Announcement Oct 21 2

Among those targeted for their online activity in Cambodia recently are two young rappers, a Buddhist monk, human rights and environmental activists, journalists and others for posts critical of the government, as well as jokes, poems and songs.

The national internet gateway could have a chilling effect on Cambodian youth and other internet users in the country of 16 million people, said LICADHO’s Naly Pilorge.

“Regardless of what action tech-savvy groups or activists may take, there will be millions of Cambodians who simply want to exercise their rights to freedom of expression online,” she said. “They will now be blocked by this new authoritarian internet infrastructure.”

When he was released last year, Sovann Chhay vowed to continue fighting for the release of his father, an opposition party member imprisoned for anti-government dissent.

Sovann Chhay’s mother, Prum Chantha, who belongs to the Friday Wives group which organizes protests to demand the release of their imprisoned husbands, fears that her son will no longer be at risk of arrest when the new gateway is put in place.

“I told him he needed to be more careful about what he said online, but I don’t think he fully understood,” she said.

“I have to watch him more – but I can’t watch him all the time like the government can.”

A Porterville woman appears to be on the cover of Inked magazine | Pictures

A former Porterville woman entered a cover girl contest and is asking the community to help take her to the next level.

Megan Borba, a registered nurse working at Visalia, recently entered Inked Magazine’s Cover Girl 2022 contest.

“I managed to get selected to compete in the contest, Top 15, Top 10 and now I’m in the Top 5,” Borba said. “Entrants from across the country compete to win the grand prize which must be a Cover Girl Inked Magazine 2022, a photo shoot by Inked Magazine for a two-page photo series and (win) a cash prize of 25,000 $.”

Born and raised in Porterville, Borba graduated from Monache High School in 2004. She is a graduate of Porterville College’s Registered Professional Nurse program and West Hills College’s Registered Nurse program. She is now a registered nurse working at the Hospice de Visalia.

“I’m proud to represent Porterville and the Central Valley on this journey,” Borba said. “It’s a cool experience to go this far in something where so many women have come in and been represented. It’s so awesome because to be honest, I didn’t really think I would go this far.

Borba’s fascination with tattoos began at his 2-year-old son’s father’s tattoo shop in Pismo.

“Over the years it has become a part of me,” she said. “I now have two sleeves but every little tattoo tells a story. So when I saw the contest I decided to enter. It’s a cool experience to go this far in something where so many women entered.

Her favorite tattoo, she says, is the names of her three sons, which are imprinted on her back.

“Jayden, Jaxon and Jesse. They are my world, my reason for living, all my heart and soul,” she said. “I couldn’t imagine life without them.”

Borba now stands up for men, women and children who have been abused.

“I want them all to know that they are strong, important and above all beautiful, just the way they are,” Borba said.

And if she wins, her plan is to place a down payment on a house for her and her children.

“I was raised by a single mother and never had a stable place to live while I was growing up,” Borba said. “I want my boys to have a place they know they can always call home, a place to hold all of our memories and our love.”

The competition involves the public voting for a candidate to progress through the rounds. And Borba only has a few days to climb to the top spot and qualify for the semi-finals.

The public can vote for free once a day via Facebook’s social media site. Additional votes can be purchased at $1 each. And all votes must be received by 7 p.m. Thursday to make it through to the semifinals.

To visit https://cover.inkedmag.com/2022/megan-borba for a free daily vote.

Scaling High Cs – Culture City :: SRQ Magazine article by Phil Lederer

Tenor William Davenport Climbs Everest of Arias at Sarasota Opera House

“Ah! my friends, what a feast day! It was the aria that propelled Luciano Pavarotti to legendary status as ‘King of the High Cs’, when he sang it at the top of his voice at the Metropolitan Opera in 1972, and the only one that could justify breaking the rule. strict ‘No Encores’ at La Scala – a diktat that lasted 74 years before Peruvian tenor Juan Diego Flores could resist a cover. And when daughter of the regiment opens at Sarasota Opera House on February 19, tenor William Davenport returns to Sarasota Opera House with expectations as high as the scores themselves. “It’s really like walking a tightrope,” he says. “Terrifying, but thrilling.”

Most of the music in Donizetti’s opéra-comique seems innocuous enough, but for this aria at the end of Act I, with a huge high eight C that towers over the page in quick succession like some lyrical Alps separating future Hannibals from their lesser imitators. It’s a peak Davenport has reached for Sarasota audiences before, in Bohemian like Rodolfo, but nine of them? (A high C ninth is not written but almost always added at the end, because once you’ve locked that sort of thing in, the instinct is just to push it as far as you can.)

“Hearing someone go into a big, high C, full voice, and throw yourself into it with reckless abandon makes everyone sit on the edge of their seat,” says Davenport. “But you have to be smart about how you practice. You don’t want to sing this tune 10 times a day or you could hurt yourself. He therefore isolates pieces to work on, without ever forcing or fighting against fatigue, which only invites injuries and bad habits. Plus, Davenport knows he can hit the note. The biggest challenge will probably be psychological. “Especially with that tune,” he says. He therefore works to cultivate the psychological calm that will allow him not only to sing at his best, but to play at his best, as Tonio in love.

“The real treat is when you can do it without stepping out of character and when you can use character to power the technique,” ​​says Davenport. “At the end of the day, the goal is to forget all that and go up there and be Tonio.”

Scaling High Cs – Culture City :: SRQ Magazine article by Phil Lederer

“Ah! my friends, what a party! It was the tune that propelled Luciano Pavarotti to legendary status as “King of the High Cs”, when he sang it at the top of his voice at the Metropolitan Opera in 1972, and the only one that could justify breaking the rule. Strict ‘No Encores’ at La Scala – a diktat that lasted 74 years before Peruvian tenor Juan Diego Flores could resist a cover. And when daughter of the regiment opens at Sarasota Opera House on February 19, tenor William Davenport returns to Sarasota Opera House with expectations as high as the scores themselves. “It’s really like walking a tightrope,” he says. “Terrifying, but thrilling.”

Most of Donizetti’s comic opera music seems innocuous enough, but for this aria at the end of Act I, with a huge eight C dominating the page in rapid succession like lyrical Alps separating the future Hannibals from their lesser imitators. It’s a peak Davenport has reached for Sarasota audiences before, in Bohemian like Rodolfo, but nine of them? (A high C ninth is not written out but almost always added at the end, because once you’ve locked that sort of thing in, the instinct is just to push it as far as you can.)

“Hearing someone go into a big, high C, full voice, and throw themselves into it with reckless abandon makes everyone sit on the edge of their seat,” says Davenport. “But you have to be smart about how you practice. You don’t want to sing this tune 10 times a day or you could hurt yourself. He therefore isolates the pieces to be worked on, without ever forcing or fighting against fatigue, which only invites injuries and bad habits. Plus, Davenport knows he can hit the note. The biggest challenge will probably be psychological. “Especially with that tune,” he says. He therefore works to cultivate the psychological calm that will allow him not only to sing at his best, but to play at his best, like Tonio in love.

“The real treat is when you can do it without stepping out of character and when you can use character to power the technique,” says Davenport. “At the end of the day, the goal is to forget all that and get up there and be Tonio.”

Scaling High Cs – Culture City :: SRQ Magazine article by Phil Lederer

“Ah! my friends, what a party! It was the tune that propelled Luciano Pavarotti to legendary status as “King of the High Cs”, when he sang it at the top of his voice at the Metropolitan Opera in 1972, and the only one that could justify breaking the rule. Strict ‘No Encores’ at La Scala – a diktat that lasted 74 years before Peruvian tenor Juan Diego Flores could resist a cover. And when daughter of the regiment opens at Sarasota Opera House on February 19, tenor William Davenport returns to Sarasota Opera House with expectations as high as the scores themselves. “It’s really like walking a tightrope,” he says. “Terrifying, but thrilling.”

Most of the music in Donizetti’s comic opera seems innocuous enough, but for this aria at the end of Act I, with a huge high eight C dominating the page in rapid succession like lyrical Alps separating the future Hannibals of their lesser imitators. It’s a peak Davenport has reached for Sarasota audiences before, in Bohemian like Rodolfo, but nine of them? (A high C ninth is not written out but almost always added at the end, because once you’ve locked that sort of thing in, the instinct is just to push it as far as you can.)

“Hearing someone go into a big, high C, full voice, and throw themselves into it with reckless abandon makes everyone sit on the edge of their seat,” says Davenport. “But you have to be smart about how you practice. You don’t want to sing this tune 10 times a day or you could hurt yourself. He therefore isolates the pieces to be worked on, without ever forcing or fighting against fatigue, which only invites injuries and bad habits. Plus, Davenport knows he can hit the note. The biggest challenge will probably be psychological. “Especially with that tune,” he says. He therefore works to cultivate the psychological calm that will allow him not only to sing at his best, but to play at his best, like Tonio in love.

“The real treat is when you can do it without stepping out of character and when you can use character to power the technique,” says Davenport. “At the end of the day, the goal is to forget about all that and get up there and be Tonio.”

XTRA EXCLUSIVE – Democracy Project (Chapter 5): Local Freo tells the goal of the port community’s online magazine

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Do today’s unions stand a chance against corporate America?

Large unions are also experimenting. This month, thousands of workers at an Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama, will begin voting on whether or not to join the Retail Wholesale and Department Store Union. The International Brotherhood of Teamsters wants to help Amazon warehouse and transportation workers get a union contract.

There is an urgency today that did not exist when Miranda assisted customers by phone: Amazon is now the avatar of a monopoly economy. This economy has the 10 richest men in the world twice as rich in the grisly months since March 2020. It’s an economy that makes me feel like the zillionth fly scampering in a global anthill. The days I don’t, it’s because of the workers I talk to and the little mutinies I see — at Amazon and in nursing homes, truck yards, schools, factories, and grocery stores. . “We’re definitely not going to have a better time to have a union,” Daniel Gross, a longtime organizer, told me recently. What sounded like his way of saying, The template is in place; we all know the score.

Workers always have organized in various ways, formal and informal. Since the beginning of the American labor movement in the 19th century, there have been unions, as well as more ad hoc groups of workers. Back in the days of Amazon’s call center campaign, organizations like WashTech were very much in vogue. They were called “worker centers” and tended to focus on communities (such as Nepali immigrants) or types of jobs (such as restaurant delivery people) that traditional unions had failed to reach.

I got to know these groups in the mid-1980s when, as an attorney, I joined a legal services agency representing worker centers in New York. Center offices were welcoming and unbureaucratic. They had limited resources and small staff but, in the years that followed, achieved goals far beyond their means: bills of rights for domestic workers, new regulations for nail salon technicians and delivery cyclists. food, debt relief for taxi drivers.

I was impressed with their holistic approach: a construction day worker wasn’t defined by their salary and working hours — they also needed an affordable apartment and help applying for a green card. Members of progressive unions also thought this way, especially as the Great Recession and Occupy Wall Street highlighted the larger context of workplace struggles. And over the past decade, as a journalist and no longer a lawyer, I have seen the influence of progressives grow.

In 2020, I thought this heightened enthusiasm for organizing, combined with mass death and financial hardship, could result in a broad labor movement. There were hints of fermentation in the essential worker walkouts and record turnout in protests following the murder of George Floyd. After that, things calmed down – due, I think, to the temporary lifting of an expanded welfare state.

But then, between August and November 2021, more than four million employees quit their jobs every month — individual actions that expressed a rebellious impulse. I have noticed the same confident discontent in organized labor: last fall thousands of unionized workers went on strike or were about to strike at John Deere, Kellogg’s, Kaiser Permanente hospitals and clinics and on Hollywood film sets. The wave of people quitting their jobs has been named the Great Resignation; the turmoil from within felt more like a great denial, a commitment to reject the status quo and demand transformation.

Print Phoenix – SRQist :: SRQ magazine article by Brittany Mattie

Owner Georgia Court is building the new downtown location. Photo by Wyatt Kostygan

We can be biasedbut we hope the print never dies. Nothing beats the palpable smell of opening a new book. The tactile sensation of holding pages between the fingers. Doggy listening or pointing out a favorite quote or a particularly poignant paragraph. Devouring a hardback or paperback dinner cover that you just couldn’t bear to put down. Admit it, looking over a shelf stacked with colorful spines and inviting titles evokes an air of scientific prestige that a Kindle, audiobook, or social media platform simply can’t provide. So we especially like to see small businesses in the fun publishing industry succeed.

ORIGINAL BOOKSTORE1 SHOWCASE COURTESY OF @BOOKSTORE1. SHOP ONLINE AT SARASOTABOOKS.COM.

Having opened its doors in 2011 to bring a high-quality independent bookstore to the Sarasota area, Bookstore1 celebrates its tenth anniversary with an exciting move to continue providing book lovers – patrons and authors – with an intimate and personalized shopping experience. Bookstore1 will say goodbye to its downtown location at the corner of Palm Avenue and Main Street, where its storefronts with the latest and greatest books recommended by Bookstore1 employees have drawn passers-by closer. But it’s not a goodbye forever, it’s a date on State Street and Lemon Avenue, a few blocks away. As retailers begin to fill the outdoor breezeway on the ground floor of The Mark, Bookstore1 officially opens its new doors later this month with just over 4,000 square feet, an extra 1,000 square feet than its original space. “The new location will now give us more space for book club meetings, poetry readings, book signings and workshops, as we will now have a mezzanine where groups can congregate away from the hustle and bustle of retail stores”, Owner of € Georgia Court shares. “Before, we had limited workshops, except those that have been online for a few years, because there was not enough space to hold them. Now we have that space and more. The new location will also help future-proof the bookstore, Court said. “I’ve been looking for a suitable site for a few years and I’m thrilled to be at The Mark, which I believe will be the coolest condo building in the area.”

Buying a space, rather than renting it, gives Court greater control to ensure the existence and evolution of its first downtown retail space dedicated to not-so-dying art. . storytelling and printed reading.

Medical Advance – Feature :: SRQ magazine article by Jacob Ogles

SMH executives David Verinder and Lorrie Liang pose proudly in front of the hospital’s new oncology tower. Photograph by Wyatt Kostygan

An aquamarine sparkle reflects the paradise of Sarasota in the pans of the Brian D. Jellison Cancer Institute’s Oncology Tower at Sarasota Memorial Hospital. The instantly iconic addition of Sarasota Memorial Hospital (SMH) is an integral part of the city’s skyline, as the doctors inside serve patients from across the region with or at risk of cancer. Meanwhile, a new campus for Sarasota Memorial Hospital is redefining the Laurel Road interchange on Interstate-75 from a truck stop to a critical destination for those in need of medical attention. The multimillion-dollar facility expands SMH’s physical presence with a full-service public hospital, serving South County for the first time in history. It’s all part of an unprecedented expansion of the hospital system’s footprint and regional facilities, and an expansion that won’t end anytime soon.

“Our vision is to establish hospitals in key locations, first on Laurel Road and then in North Port, to provide convenient acute care to these growing communities. We think it’s time to move on. — David Verinder, CEO of Sarasota Memorial Health Care System

RISE

Plans for an oncology tower come as cancer cases continue to rise in the region and nationally. SMH officials decided in 2015 that as part of the system’s strategic plan, improvements to cancer services in the region would be essential. Lorrie Liang, president of the Sarasota campus for SMH, said when the hospital was gathering data on what the community needed to move forward, they learned a startling fact.

“About 50% of people diagnosed here at SMH leave our county for cancer care,” Liang said. “It was really amazing and shocking to us, that people sometimes felt like with such a serious diagnosis, you had to get in your car or a plane to get the care you needed.” The hospital therefore embarked on the construction of the new Oncology Tower, a 180,000 square foot facility with 56 private suites dedicated to cancer patients spread over two floors. Nine operating theaters have been specially equipped with Da Vinci robotic equipment for the treatment of cancer. To increase comfort for patients and families, the Oncology Tower even has dedicated kitchens, waiting facilities, a juice bar, and a rooftop cafe with a nutrition-focused menu. and an 8th-floor view of Sarasota Bay.

The decision on what to include in the cancer center came after a conclusive assessment of the most prevalent forms of cancer in the area and the greatest needs for preventive and surgical care. The goal was to find a comprehensive level of care to help patients from diagnosis. The goal at every step was to ensure that no one living in Sarasota would ever have to leave this area to obtain the highest quality care while fighting for their own life. Radiation therapy, infusion technology, and other medical oncology treatments available for major forms of cancer are now available on or off campus, including at a Radiation Therapy Center on University Parkway that opened in August 2020.

“We are really excited because we have hired many fellowship-trained oncologists, oncology surgeons who are tumor site specific, breast, thyroid, parathyroid, ENT, chest, etc. “, said Liang. “We are delighted to hire some very good surgeons to complement our existing staff. And we knew the caliber of doctors we were looking for wouldn’t come or stay if we didn’t have this holistic approach.

It’s not just cancer treatment that’s growing on the Sarasota campus. The hospital is in the process of removing the existing facility at the Bayside Center for Behavioral Health on Osprey Avenue, which officials say has lost its usefulness. “Behavioral health needs are on the rise, and we have people diagnosed as needing behavioral health services who are either leaving this county or not being treated,” Liang said.

Today, SMH has an ongoing $65 million inpatient and outpatient facility dedicated to helping patients overcome crises and maintain mental health. Liang said a continuum of services will be provided there. It will include a 16-bed geriatric unit, a 22-bed unit for children and adolescents, 24 beds for adults, and then a 22-bed acute care unit. The hospital plans to innovate there this month.

COLLECT MILLIONS

Improvements to the hospital required a heavy investment, more than is available simply through a tax base, even one that spans the entire county in a community with high property values. The new behavioral health facility is possible in large part thanks to a $10 million donation from retail giant Brian Cornell, CEO of Target, and his wife Martha. The establishment will bear the name of the family.

“I have the privilege of leading a team of over 350,000 people and have seen firsthand the power of creating a caring culture that prioritizes mental health and wellbeing, and provides resources, space and support for all families,” Brian Cornell said in a statement. “I also recognized the importance of humanizing this topic, removing the stigma that discourages some people from seeking the support they need, while improving access to care that puts people at the centre. I hope this project sheds light on the importance of comprehensive behavioral healthcare and inspires others to support this project and others like it across the country.

Martha Cornell added, “We are proud to play a part in creating this state-of-the-art behavioral health lodge, whose centralized approach addresses an immense need by providing convenient, comprehensive care under one roof. . . We know it will change countless lives in Sarasota, a community that has been dear to our family for years, and we hope it inspires change across the country. But that’s just one of the ongoing philanthropic missions carried out by the Sarasota Memorial Healthcare Foundation. The oncology tower is being funded by a $75 million capital campaign, a dollar amount to cover the new radiation therapy center and tower in Sarasota, but also a planned Venice tower that will mirror the Sarasota facilities. Foundation spokeswoman Tricia Mahler said private support helps push the expansion of new facilities forward aggressively, as public revenue generated for the hospital maintains operations.

The growth cements SMH’s position as the dominant healthcare provider for the region, although amidst a global pandemic, the facility’s leaders remain convinced that all hospitals in the region should continue to serve the public.

Sarasota Memorial Hospital, from its beginnings as a public facility, served the entirety of Sarasota County, charging taxes to North Trail residents at the North Port to support the state-of-the-art facility.

Print Phoenix – SRQist :: SRQ magazine article by Brittany Mattie

BOOKSTORE1 is moving to a bigger space where bibliophiles can stretch their reading muscles

Owner Georgia Court is building the new downtown location. Photo by Wyatt Kostygan

We can be biasedbut we hope the print never dies. Nothing beats the palpable smell of opening a new book. The tactile sensation of holding pages between the fingers. Doggy listening to or highlighting a favorite quote or particularly poignant paragraph. Devouring a hardback or paperback dinner cover that you just couldn’t bear to put down. Admit it, looking over a shelf stacked with colorful spines and inviting titles evokes an air of scientific prestige that a Kindle, audiobook, or social media platform simply can’t provide. So we especially like to see small businesses in the fun publishing industry succeed.

ORIGINAL BOOKSTORE1 SHOWCASE COURTESY OF @BOOKSTORE1. SHOP ONLINE AT SARASOTABOOKS.COM.

Having opened its doors in 2011 to bring a high-quality independent bookstore to the Sarasota area, Bookstore1 celebrates its tenth anniversary with an exciting move to continue providing book lovers – patrons and authors – with an intimate and personalized shopping experience. Bookstore1 will say goodbye to its downtown location at the corner of Palm Avenue and Main Street, where its storefronts with the latest and greatest books recommended by Bookstore1 employees have drawn passers-by closer. But it’s not a goodbye forever, it’s a date on State Street and Lemon Avenue, a few blocks away. As retailers begin to fill the outdoor breezeway on the ground floor of The Mark, Bookstore1 officially opens its new doors later this month with just over 4,000 square feet, an extra 1,000 square feet than its original space. “The new location will now give us more space for book club meetings, poetry readings, book signings and workshops, as we will now have a mezzanine where groups can congregate away from the “hustle and bustle.” retail stores,” shares owner Georgia Court. “Before, we had limited workshops, except those online for the past few years, because there wasn’t enough space to hold them. Now we have that space And more. The new location will also help secure the long-term life of the bookshop, Court said. “I had been looking for a suitable site for a few years and I am delighted to be at The Mark, which I believe will is the coolest condo building in the area.”

Buying a space, rather than renting it, gives Court greater control to ensure the existence and evolution of its premier downtown retail space dedicated to not-so-dying art. . storytelling and printed reading.

Medical Advance – Feature :: SRQ magazine article by Jacob Ogles

Sarasota Memorial Hospital expands upward and outward.

SMH executives David Verinder and Lorrie Liang pose proudly in front of the hospital’s new oncology tower. Photograph by Wyatt Kostygan

An aquamarine sparkle reflects the paradise of Sarasota in the pans of the Brian D. Jellison Cancer Institute Oncology Tower at Sarasota Memorial Hospital. The instantly iconic addition of Sarasota Memorial Hospital (SMH) is an integral part of the city’s skyline, as the doctors inside serve patients from across the region suffering from or at risk of cancer. Meanwhile, a new campus for Sarasota Memorial Hospital is redefining the Laurel Road interchange on Interstate-75 from a truck stop to a critical destination for those in need of medical attention. The multimillion-dollar facility expands SMH’s physical presence with a full-service public hospital, serving South County for the first time in history. It’s all part of an unprecedented expansion of the hospital system’s footprint and regional facilities, and an expansion that won’t end anytime soon.

“Our vision is to establish hospitals in key locations, first on Laurel Road and then in North Port, to provide convenient acute care to these growing communities. We believe it is time to move forward. — David Verinder, CEO of Sarasota Memorial Health Care System

TO GET UP

Plans for an oncology tower come as cancer cases continue to rise in the region and nationally. SMH officials decided in 2015 that as part of the system’s strategic plan, improvements to cancer services in the region would be essential. Lorrie Liang, president of the Sarasota campus for SMH, said when the hospital was gathering data on what the community needed to move forward, they learned a startling fact.

“About 50% of people diagnosed here at SMH leave our county for cancer care,” Liang said. “It was really amazing and shocking to us, that people felt like with such a serious diagnosis sometimes, you had to get in your car or a plane to get the care you needed.” The hospital therefore embarked on the construction of the new Oncology Tower, a 180,000 square foot facility with 56 private suites dedicated to cancer patients spread over two floors. Nine operating theaters have been specially equipped with Da Vinci robotic equipment for the treatment of cancer. To increase patient and family comfort, the Oncology Tower even has dedicated kitchens, waiting facilities, and a rooftop juice bar and cafe with a nutrition-focused menu. and an 8th-floor view of Sarasota Bay.

The decision on what to include in the cancer center came after a conclusive assessment of the most prevalent forms of cancer in the area and the greatest needs for preventive and surgical care. The goal was to find a comprehensive level of care to help patients from diagnosis. The goal at every step was to ensure that no one living in Sarasota would ever have to leave this area to obtain the highest quality care as they fought for their own lives. Radiation therapy, infusion technology and other medical oncology treatments available for major forms of cancer are now available on or off campus, including at a radiation therapy center on University Parkway that opened in August 2020.

“We are really excited because we have hired many fellowship-trained oncologists, oncology surgeons who are tumor site specific, breast, thyroid, parathyroid, ENT, thoracic, etc.,” Liang said. “We are delighted to hire very good surgeons to augment our existing staff. And we knew the caliber of doctors we were looking for wouldn’t come or stay if we didn’t have this holistic approach.

It’s not just cancer treatment that’s growing on the Sarasota campus. The hospital is in the process of removing the existing facility at the Bayside Center for Behavioral Health on Osprey Avenue, which officials say has lost its usefulness. “Behavioral health needs are on the rise, and we have people diagnosed as needing behavioral health services who are either moving out of this county or not being treated,” Liang said.

Now, SMH has a $65 million inpatient and outpatient facility in the works dedicated to helping patients overcome crises and preserve their sanity. Liang said a continuum of services will be provided there. It will include a 16-bed geriatric unit, a 22-bed unit for children and adolescents, 24 beds for adults, and then a 22-bed acute care unit. The hospital plans to innovate there this month.

COLLECT MILLIONS

Improvements to the hospital have required a heavy investment, more than is available simply through a tax base, even one that spans the entire county in a community with high property values. The new behavioral health facility is possible in large part thanks to a $10 million donation from retail giant Brian Cornell, CEO of Target, and his wife Martha. The establishment will bear the name of the family.

“I have the privilege of leading a team of over 350,000 people and have seen firsthand the power of creating a caring culture that prioritizes mental health and wellbeing, and provides resources, space and support for all families,” Brian Cornell said in a statement. “I also recognized the importance of humanizing this topic, removing the stigma that discourages some people from seeking the support they need, while improving access to care that puts people at the centre. I hope this project sheds light on the importance of comprehensive behavioral health care and inspires others to support this project and others like it across the country.

Martha Cornell added, “We are proud to play a part in creating this state-of-the-art behavioral health lodge, whose centralized approach addresses an immense need by providing convenient, comprehensive care under one roof. . We know this will change countless lives in Sarasota, a community that has been dear to our family for years, and we hope it inspires change across the country. But that’s just one of the ongoing philanthropic missions being carried out by the Sarasota Memorial Healthcare Foundation. The oncology tower is being funded by a $75 million capital campaign, a dollar amount to cover the new radiation therapy center and tower in Sarasota, but also a planned Venice tower that will mirror the Sarasota facilities. Foundation spokeswoman Tricia Mahler said the private support helps push the expansion of new facilities forward aggressively, as public revenue generated for the hospital keeps operations going.

The growth cements SMH’s position as the dominant healthcare provider for the region, although amidst a global pandemic, the facility’s leaders remain convinced that all hospitals in the region should continue to serve the public.

Sarasota Memorial Hospital, from its beginnings as a public facility, served the entirety of Sarasota County, charging taxes to North Trail residents at the North Port to support the state-of-the-art facility.

Print Phoenix – SRQist :: SRQ Magazine article by Brittany Mattie

BOOKSTORE1 is moving to a bigger space where bibliophiles can stretch their reading muscles

Owner Georgia Court in active construction of the new downtown location. Photo by Wyatt Kostygan

We can be biasedbut we hope the print never dies. Nothing beats the palpable smell of opening a new book. The tactile sensation of holding pages between your fingertips. Doggy listening or highlighting a favorite quote or a particularly poignant paragraph. Devouring a hardback or paperback cover for dinner that you just couldn’t bear to put down. Admit it, looking over a shelf stacked with colorful spines and inviting titles conjures up an air of scientific prestige that a Kindle, audiobook, or social media platform simply can’t provide. So we especially like to see small businesses in the fun publishing business succeed.

ORIGINAL BOOKSTORE1 SHOWCASE COURTESY OF @BOOKSTORE1. SHOP ONLINE AT SARASOTABOOKS.COM.

Having opened its doors in 2011 to bring a high-quality independent bookstore to the Sarasota area, Bookstore1 celebrates its tenth anniversary with an exciting move to continue providing book lovers – patrons and authors – with an intimate and personalized shopping experience. Bookstore1 will say goodbye to its downtown location at the corner of Palm Avenue and Main Street, where its storefronts with the latest and greatest bookrecommended books from Bookstore1 employees have drawn passers-by closer. But it’s not a goodbye forever, it’s a date on State Street and Lemon Avenue, a few blocks away. As retailers begin to fill the outdoor breezeway on the ground floor of The Mark, Bookstore1 officially opens its new doors later this month with just over 4,000 square feet, or 1,000 square feet more than its original space. “The new location will now give us more space for book club meetings, poetry readings, book signings and workshops, as we will now have a mezzanine where groups can congregate away from the ‘retail store hustle,’ shares owner Georgia Court. “Before, we had limited workshops, except for the ones online in recent years, because there was not enough space to hold them. Now we have this space. And more. The new location will also help ensure the long-term life of the bookstore, Court says. “I’ve been looking for a suitable site for a few years and I’m so thrilled to be at The Mark, which I think is the coolest condo building in the area.”

Purchasing a space, rather than renting it, gives Court greater control to ensure the existence and evolution of its primary downtown retail space dedicated to not-so-dying art. storytelling and printed reading.

Stevie Nicks is still living her dreams

I first met Stevie Nicks in 2013, when I was about to turn seventeen. At the time, I edited Beginneran online magazine for teenage girls, and I had recently given a efilexTeen talk criticizes a trend of superficially “strong” female characters in pop culture. I’m sure the video would embarrass me now, but I stand by its closing line: “Just be Stevie Nicks.” A few months later, I heard from Nicks’ management team. Her cousin had sent her the video of my lecture and she wanted to invite me to a Fleetwood Mac show. At the gig in Chicago, I bawled as I listened to Nicks sing his otherworldly songs, and was stunned when I heard the same voice dedicate his performance of “Landslide” to me. Backstage, Nicks presented me with a gold moon necklace, a token she bestows on those she takes under her wing. We kept a friendship, and in 2017 I interviewed her for the Rookie podcast. Then the show’s production company shut down mid-season and the conversation never aired.

In the years since, Nicks’ appeal to younger generations has only grown. On TikTok, his songs offer a soundtrack for viral videos and fans pay tribute to him aesthetic witch. Artists such as Harry StylesMiley Cyrus and Lana Del Rey asked her to lend her voice to their songs, and she became “fairy godmotherto a wide circle of young artists. For the listeners too, she has always acted as a kind of spiritual guide. In his music, loss is both heartbreaking and banal. Heartbreak is survivable, and perhaps a key to self-knowledge. Many of his songs take place at night, in dreams or visions,”somewhere deep in your mind.” Her narrator frequently asks questions about herself and a higher power, as if in constant conversation with her own intuition. When I said, “Just be Stevie Nicks,” I thought of how her work had taught me to see such sensitivity as a source of strength. Nicks music is what you listen to when you need help listening to yourself.

For two evenings last month, Nicks and I met on the phone. She was at home in Santa Monica, where she spent the pandemic keeping late night hours and working on a TV series based on the Welsh myth of Rhiannon. When she apologized for asking to speak at 10:30 a.m. PM AND, I assured him that I was on a similar schedule. “Good,” she said. “So we’re definitely friends of the night.” This interview was adapted from our first unpublished conversation and our recent ones.

I read that you kept a diary every day since you started Fleetwood Mac. Do you ever go back and re-read old entries?

When I keep my diary, it’s big, like a phone book, because I always feel like it’s never going to get lost. So what I do is I write on the right side of the page, and then on the left side I write poetry, which I usually take straight from my prose. So often, when I come back to them, it’s to look at the poetry of the songs. I’d rather spend time writing a new journal entry than going back and reading old journal entries because if you go back you won’t move forward. I’m just trying to keep moving forward.

It seems like the journal entries and your songwriting are sort of running side by side.

They are. Especially if what I’m writing has a… when I say the word “romantic,” I don’t necessarily mean romantic in terms of having a guy or someone in your life. I mean just sunny days or, just, remember the way the air felt on your skin, or the way your hair felt when the wind blew through, or the way the trees sounded, or that sort of thing. So if my journal entry has a romantic tinge to it, I might flip through it and say, “This entry would make a really good poem,” which could then be turned into a great song.

“When you keep music in your life, I think it changes you and pulls you out of a deep hole,” Nicks says.Photograph from the Michael Ochs Archives/Donaldson Collection/Getty

I saw your show “24 Karat Gold” and you told a lot of origin stories about where your songs came from.

Almost all of them were what I call “songs that went into the gothic vault of lost songs”. For some reason they didn’t make any records. It wasn’t because they weren’t good enough. It was because I didn’t like the way they were recorded, or there were too many songs, and when you put together twelve songs, sometimes you have to lose a song that you really like just because you have too many slow songs and you need faster songs. When you sequence your record, it’s work, it’s not about each song separately.

A lot of those songs were in a suitcase that was accidentally sold at a flea market after I went on the road in 1983. So the songs have been traveling the internet now. A lot of people in the audience knew the songs, but there are also the next two generations who probably didn’t. So I thought it was enough to tell them the story behind each of these really unknown songs: what it was about, who was involved and when it was written, and build a story around it.

How did the suitcase of cassettes come back to you?

Well, my best friend, [Robin]when she died [of leukemia, in 1982], she was pregnant. I decided, in my crazy state of mind, that I was just going to marry her husband so I could take care of the child. Well, that didn’t work out very well. So for three months, getting ready to go on a big tour, I tried to be a mom, and it was impossible. And then out of nowhere, I just said, “You know what? We have to divorce. I left, and he just decided to clean the whole house, and there was a suitcase of tapes – I’m not sure if he knew what was on all those tapes. It had, like, a garage sale, and I don’t think the people who bought it necessarily knew what was in there either. But someone [eventually] figured out what it was, and then all of a sudden all these demos were out there in the world. So some fans who found that bought them and sent them back to me. That’s how cool my fans are. And then I took a lot of great demos to Nashville and said I wanted to record those songs, but I want them exactly as they are. And they did. And that’s why I love this record so much, because the songs on it are really close to the way I wrote them.

I loved some of the stories you shared on social media about your songs. I was so happy and surprised to learn that the “white-winged dove” first reading on a menu . . .

On the plane.

It’s such an unlikely source of inspiration.

I know, coming from Phoenix so far. And who knew that the white-winged dove was that bird in Phoenix, or Arizona, that had taken up residence in the saguaro cactus, because it was protected there? I really didn’t know anything about doves or pigeons or whatever you want to call them. But they literally said, “That bird, when it makes a sound, it sounds like ‘Ooh, ooh, ooh’,” right? And then I immediately started writing this song, which ended up being about Tom Petty and John Lennon and a bunch of people.

Fun On The Run – FORAGE :: SRQ Magazine article by Andrew Fabian

Greek-Inspired Kefi Streetside Cafe Seeks to Define Downtown’s B-City

Every now and then a new restaurant comes along that manages to find the right attributes in the nuanced calculus that determines success: location, timing, concept and price. These rare occasions produce something special, something that defines and grows organically from a particular context. As downtown Bradenton continues to forge its identity as a more affordable, younger and more laid-back neighbor to its more recognized sister city south of University Parkway, the budding foodie can look to Kefi Streetside Café as the embodiment of Bradenton’s aspirations.

THE GREEK SALAD IS LOADED AND FRESH.

The Greek Cafe and Coffee Shop operates out of what was once a bank teller window on West 6th Avenue in downtown Bradenton. Opened, owned and operated by partners Jason Simpson and Eleni Sokos, the 30-something represents the new wave of young entrepreneurs rising in a city whose history has entered an exciting new chapter. Sokos also owns a marketing business while Simpson comes from a successful career selling drinks, and the two have come together to create a cafe that celebrates Sokos’ Greek roots and provides the bustling downtown crowd with something bright and healthy thing for breakfast and lunch.

Owners Eleni Sokos and Jason Simpson

OWNERS ELENI SOKOS AND JASON SIMPSON

For its coffee program, Kefi adopted offerings from Buddy Brew, a Tampa-based third-wave roaster that provided barista training for Kefi’s crew. That means Greek coffee’s caffeine game lives up to aficionado’s standards. A honey-glazed oatmeal latte quickly became a big seller when the cafe opened in December. Oat milk reduces the weight of most lattes and helps make them a refreshing vehicle for a smooth pour of espresso. A matcha latte has a classic taste, with the slightly herbal and bitter powder requiring occasional stirring to swirl it around in the cup, but that’s not to say Kefi is avoiding experimenting with other drinks. A Seasonal Caramel Apple Cold Brew Latte combines two seemingly dissonant flavors – apple and coffee – in a stylish seasonal alternative to the guilty pleasure of Pumpkin Spice Latte (which Kefi always has on the menu).

Whimsical avocado toast goes Greek with feta, sun-dried tomatoes and olives.

FANCY AVOCADO TOAST GOES GREEK WITH FETA, DRIED TOMATOES AND OLIVES.

Baked breakfast treats are courtesy of Sweets Bake House, with whom Sokos and Simpson have collaborated on some specialty items. From this collaboration was born a tsai oatmeal cookie (“tsai” means “chai” in Greek). The piece of butter is refreshing and spiced up with chai spices, perfect for dipping in a hot cup of tea. Another standout pastry is the Blueberry Lemon Goat Cheese Muffin. Whether or not the product description needs a comma between all those delicious modifiers is beside the point – this muffin achieves a richness that few muffins do. The goat cheese in particular is a nice (and Greek) touch that adds creaminess and a touch of salt.

An assortment of caffeinated drinks for demanding palates.

AN ASSORTMENT OF CAFFEINED DRINKS FOR DISCERNING PALATES.

An assortment of avocado toast options are suitable for breakfast and lunch. The “basic” option comes with mashed avocado spread on pieces of multigrain toast, then topped with sliced ​​cucumber marinated in olive oil and spices. A microgreen topping adds to the vibrant, wholesome appeal of the toast. The “fancy like” toast gets the full Greek treatment, especially the Peloponnese. The Sokos family originated from the Kalamata region on the peninsula, where the same olive also comes from. The “fantasy” includes diced kalamata olives to accompany sun-dried tomatoes, feta cheese, a sprinkle of oregano and a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil. Dirty, Tart and vegetal, the exciting flavor profile is held together by the creamy mashed avocado base, while the cheese helps make this a respectably hearty lunch.

The spanakopita comes with a tzatziki sauce loaded with dill flavor.

THE SPANAKOPITA COMES WITH A TZATZIKI SAUCE LOADED WITH FLAVOR OF DILL.

In the absence of a fully ventilated kitchen, Sokos and Simpson had to get creative with the delicious Greek salad on the menu that comes topped with chicken. Rather than deal with the permits and construction nightmare of drilling a massive hole in the old structure, Kefi uses the vacuum method. But using carefully regulated hot water to cook vacuum-sealed food also has the added benefit of almost never overcooking its contents – food can only cook at water temperature. When ready, the chicken is tossed in a light lemon and herb sauce before resting on a bed of greens. A generous pour of the accompanying extra virgin olive oil is advised.

As delicious as all food is, its greatest strength is accessibility. Kefi never tries to portray itself as a chef-led company eager to wow the culinary adventure seekers. Rather, it’s a community café designed to gather together, to enjoy a quick, healthy and fresh bite of local treats. An outgrowth of the friendly bustle of downtown Bradenton, the word Kefi itself could very well describe the town. Although no direct translation exists, “kefi” describes a feeling of joy at being alive.

Kefi Streetside Cafe Walk-in Window, 1201 6th Ave W, Bradenton, 941-896-2282, kefistreetsidecafe.com, @kefistreetsidecafe

Real Vegas Magazine Welcomes Michael H Kaleikini as Business Editor

Real Vegas magazine brought new expertise and appointed Michael H Kaleikini as its new business editor

Michael H. Kaleikini takes on a new position as business editor for Real Vegas magazine. He will be responsible for increasing the digital footprint through new online strategies that will shift the revenue model from quarterly to monthly and increase exposure for elite local businesses in the print and digital sectors.

Michael brings with him 16 years of marketing and business development experience. This ranges from email marketing and traditional business development to new online strategies that generate business leads and increase digital footprint online.

Michael currently has a business podcast called Java Chat where he interviews entrepreneurs and experts on the topics of business marketing, leadership, and adversity. He intends to bring this knowledge to the digital side of Real Vegas Magazine to grow their online presence along with a few other strategies that will eventually allow Real Vegas Magazine to dominate the Las Vegas Valley; both online and offline.

Michael will also be attending the 1st Annual Real Vegas Ball to be held on February 18, 2022 at the Emerald at Queensridge. Tickets are very limited, but are still available at this link: realvegasprom.eventbrite.com

Full details can be found in the about section of the company’s website, realvegasmagazine.com

Real Vegas Magazine CEO Candice Wiener expressed confidence that Michael H. Kaleikini is ready to take on the job, saying:

“The team is thrilled to have Michael on board to strengthen Real Vegas Magazine’s online presence and oversee the business column in the print version of Real Vegas Magazine. His experience in the digital space spans 16 years. He brings all of this online and commercial development to Real Vegas Magazine.The future potential of Real Vegas Magazine is exciting.

Among the new responsibilities that Michael H. Kaleikini can expect to take on, the main objectives are:

Increase digital footprint with new strategies that will shift the revenue model from quarterly to monthly, creating a larger database from which to serve local businesses and help raise awareness of local business owners in the Las Vegas Valley, increasing demand both online and in print for Real Vegas magazine. Its intention is to double print circulation in one year and build a strong, unparalleled online presence to match.

Current clients and collaborators are invited to send their congratulatory and welcome messages to the new Business Editor via the website: realvegasmagazine.com or via their LinkedIn page: linkedin.com/company/real-vegas-magazine/

Media inquiries can be sent to Michael at [email protected]

Contact information:
Name: Candice Weiener
E-mail: Send an email
Organization: All Pro Media, LLC dba Real Vegas Magazine
Address: 4195 South Grand Canyon Drive 106, Las Vegas, Nevada 89147, USA
Website: https://www.realvegasmagazine.com

Build ID: 89063321

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COMTEX_402304458/2773/2022-02-12T22:32:17

How Iceland Reignited This Surf Photographer’s Sense of Adventure

Before landing in Reykjavík for the first time in 2008, Chris Burcard was realizing what he thought was his dream: to become a surf photographer. He accumulated stamps in his passport and earned a steady salary traveling the world on magazine assignments. But two years into his career, he felt his creativity was wasted. “I was selling that sense of adventure, but I was going to places where there would be a high-rise hotel and fine dining,” said Burkard, now 35. Out recently from his home in Pismo Beach, Calif. “I didn’t know what I was looking for. I had to go get him.

He found it when he got off the plane in Iceland and a gust of salty wind hit him in the face. “There’s something different about the wind in Iceland,” he says. He remembers driving out of the airport and being impressed. “There were lava fields as far as the eye could see, distant volcanoes emerging from the clouds.” He spent two weeks filming there.

“I knew inside, I was like, ‘This is what I want,’ and I kept looking for that,” Burkard says. “Iceland sent me on a quest, to research more of these places so I could create more meaningful images and stories.”

Burkard reflects on the wandering journey of his career in Wayward: Stories and Photographs ($35), a collection of striking images and personal insights from his travels between 2006 and 2016. In the photobook, Burkard traces his journey to becoming one of the best known adventure photographers around the world.

Burkard has now visited Iceland 53 times, but that first trip in 2008 is still fresh in his mind. He was on a mission to men’s diary to photograph American filmmaker and surfer Timmy Turner, who had recently turned to cold water surfing following a near-fatal staphylococcal infection. Along with surfers Josh Mulcoy and Sam Hammer, Burkard and Turner traversed gnarly mountain passes in search of an out-of-control swell.

The Arctic is “a different playground,” says Burkard, a place with whiteout conditions and high winds on all sides, where you can’t just jump out of your car and take a picture. Behind every photo he takes is a story of being caught in a hailstorm or suffering from frostbite. Documenting Iceland, he says, “requires something more than just clicking the shutter.”

“You go to places you’ve only seen on Google Earth, like a tiny spot of white water from an aerial satellite photo. And you’re like, ‘It could be a wave,'” he says.

One day the men rode a long sandy peninsula in freezing cold and “had amazing surf, like the kind of surf you dream of in California for a year,” Burkard says. He remembers then sitting around a campfire at the beach, thinking that if this was the best life for him, he was okay with it. Then the Northern Lights lit up the sky. “Like this beauty show was there just for me in a way,” Burkard says.

As he writes in Rebel, part of him woke up in Iceland not realizing she was sleeping. The land of fire and ice, he says, “has opened up [his] eyes on what else was out there,” making places like Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula and the Faroe Islands suddenly feel accessible. “It was like a gateway drug to those deeper, more immersive experiences,” Burkard says.

Below is a series of photos from Rebel that Burkard has taken to Iceland over the years:

(Chris Burcard)

Timmy Turner, Sam Hammer and Josh Mulcoy around a campfire in Iceland in 2008.

Josh Mulcoy and Sam Hammer walk on an Icelandic glacier on their way to waves in 2008.

(Chris Burcard)

Josh Mulcoy and Sam Hammer walk on an Icelandic glacier on their way to waves in 2008.

Sam Hammer prepares for a cold surf in Iceland in 2008.

(Chris Burcard)

Sam Hammer prepares for a cold surf in Iceland in 2008.

Keith Malloy navigates through chunks of glacial ice off the coast of Iceland in 2010.

(Chris Burcard)

Keith Malloy navigates through chunks of glacial ice off the coast of Iceland in 2010.

After chasing the swell atop the Aurora, Justin Quintal plunges quickly into the Westfjords of Iceland in 2017.

(Chris Burcard)

After looking for the swell at the top of the DawnJustin Quintal takes a quick dive in the Westfjords of Iceland in 2017.

Sam Hammer is enjoying a cold after a long day of surfing in 2016.

(Chris Burcard)

Sam Hammer is enjoying a cold after a long day of surfing in 2016.

Sam Hammer slips into the green room off a fjord in Iceland in 2017.

(Chris Burcard)

Sam Hammer slips into the green room off a fjord in Iceland in 2017.

An aurora borealis lights up the Icelandic sky in 2017.

(Chris Burcard)

The Northern Lights light up the Icelandic skies in 2017.

Popcorn-colored fun – CARGO :: SRQ Magazine article by Emma Tufano

Inspired by one of Pantone’s Spring and Summer 2022 colors: Popcorn Yellow

JUST PASS THROUGH

Krumbs kitchen rubber gloves, $8; Corkcicle Classic Stemless in Neon Yellow, $23; Molly’s is a chic and unique boutique, 711 S Osprey Ave., 941-921-1221, mollyssarasota.com, @mollys_srq. Sun Bum hair mask, $4; Pura Vida Suicide Awareness Bracelet, $7; Boutique T. Georgiano, 1409-B 1st St., 941-870-3727, tgeorgianos.com, @tgeorgianos. America & Beyond Aurora Embellished Tote, $129; The Wave Inspired, 1514 Stickney Point Rd., 941-554-8720, thewaveinspired.com, @thewaveinspired.

BUTTER ME

Katie Loxton Perfect Clutch in Pale Yellow, $22; Molly’s is a chic and unique boutique, 711 S Osprey Ave., 941-921-1221, mollyssarasota.com, @mollys_srq. Billabong Showdown Women’s Jean Shorts in Dandelion, $70; Boutique T. Georgianos, 1409-B 1st St., 941-870-3727, tgeorgianos.com, @tgeorgianos. Bodylicious Body Buttercream Primers, $28; “I’m Beachy” Dazzle Dry Nail Polish, $20; Yellow strap, $6; Paint Nail Bar, 1417 1st St., 941-366-8989, paintnailbar.com, @paintnailbar. SB Design Studio Detox Glass Water Bottle, $23; Self Goddess Soul Empowered Botanical Body Oil, $20; The Wave Inspired, 1514 Stickney Point Rd., 941-554-8720, thewaveinspired.com, @thewaveinspired.

Girl to Woman – Giving Coast :: SRQ magazine article by Brittany Mattie

She grew up in a small New England town with a one-room library. When she was about 11 years old, a few of her friends got together to organize a fair to benefit their local library. That first year, Barbara Van Essen and her childhood friends earned $17 from their little fundraiser in a friend’s backyard. They would continue to hold Library Fairs for three more years – moving them to City Hall next to the Library and adding them each year. “I have a copy of the long list of books for children and young adults that the library was able to purchase with proceeds from our last fair,” Van Essen shares. Between her philanthropic and book-loving endeavors and her career as a Girl Scout, from sophomore through high school—winning the first-class prize, which was the highest honor for Girl Scout girls at the time—Van Essen became a passionate humanitarian. , mentor and heroine for young women in her community.

When she and her husband moved to southwest Florida years later, one of the first things she did was look for a Girl Scout troop for her daughter. “I volunteered to help the chief and a few months later she asked me to take over the troupe in her place,” she says. “I led my daughter’s troop from third year through high school, along with seven of the girls who won the Gold Award, which is the highest honor a girl in Girl Scouts can earn now.” Van Essen began to take on other volunteer roles for the County Girl Scouts: organizing big events for the girls, training new leaders, continuing to mentor the girls in her troop as they headed off to college. In 1997, she was asked to join the staff of the Council, Girl Scouts of Gulfcoast Florida. “Initially, I was responsible for planning events for older Girl Scouts across the council that served the Manatee County girls in Collier,” she says. “Then my position became more focused on serving girls in our low-income communities in Collier, Lee, Hendry and Glades counties.”

After retiring from her full-time position in 2017, after almost 20 years, Van Essen realized that the Gulfcoast Girl Scout program in Immokalee, a small town northeast of Naples, couldn’t. continue unattended. The majority of families came from Mexico, Guatemala or Haiti to work in agriculture. Van Essen did not want to see the approximately 230 Girl Scouts of Immokalee, or those who would follow them, lose their chance to participate in the Girl Scouts. So she stayed to continue working with them in her spare time. “Whenever I take the young Girl Scouts from Immokalee to Naples for an event or a trip to the zoo, we also go to the Naples Pier so the girls can hang out and see the Gulf of Mexico, dolphins and pelicans “, she says. . “For more than half of them, it’s the first time they’ve seen the beach, even if they live less than an hour away. And camping is the first time most girls leave home overnight. I love their excitement when cooking, canoeing or archery.

Van Essen has also taken older Girl Scouts to see our state government at work in Tallahassee, tour the White House (years ago if possible), horseback riding, rafting in North Carolina and even Pennsylvania to represent our Board. at a major national Girl Scout event where her group of eight girls chose from workshops on STEM topics, career planning, arts, sports and more. “At this event, our group of girls – whose families hailed from Haiti, Mexico and Ecuador, as well as the United States – performed a dance they had carefully choreographed to a mix of songs people representing each of their cultures,” she said. But by far the most exciting trip for her that she was able to organize was a five-day bus trip where a group of about 25 high school girls were able to visit seven American colleges and participate in sessions with college staff on admissions, financial aid, dorm life, choosing a major, etc.

“One thing that really moves me is when I hear about a girl who was in one of my Immokalee troops years ago,” says Van Essen. “One of my former students had a scholarship to go to the University of Michigan. She graduated and continued her law studies. She has now passed her bar exam and is practicing law in Michigan. She told me her parents worked long hours to keep food on the table and weren’t interested in the kids having fun. She said she wouldn’t have had a childhood without the Girl Scouts and wouldn’t have learned community service.

Van Essen has stayed in touch with many of her alumni over the years, even as the young girls grow into successful women, including one who travels the country for her job, one who teaches in North Carolina, one who teaches locally, one who just completed nursing training in New York and one who recently joined the Gulfcoast Girl Scout leadership team in Immokalee. “Hearing about all their successes is what means the most to me,” says Van Essen. The program has finally restarted in-person Girl Scout troops in Immokalee after more than a year of having to trade experiential field trips for Zoom meetings with the girls. “It’s so fun to finally see the girls again,” she says. “I can’t wait to take them camping and on field trips.”

From Girl to Woman – Giving Coast :: SRQ magazine article by Brittany Mattie

Girl Scouts of Gulfcoast Florida’s Barbara Van Essen lights the campfire for underprivileged girls to experience coming-of-age excursions that help pave life’s path

She grew up in a small New England town with a one-room library. When she was about 11 years old, a few of her friends got together to organize a fair to benefit their local library. That first year, Barbara Van Essen and her childhood friends won $17 from their little fundraiser in a friend’s backyard. They would continue to hold library fairs for three more years – moving them to City Hall next to the library and adding them each year. “I have a copy of the long list of books for children and young adults that the library was able to purchase with proceeds from our last fair,” Van Essen shares. Between her philanthropic and book-loving endeavors and her career as a Girl Scout, from sophomore through high school—winning the first-class award, which was the highest honor for girls in Girl Scouts at the time—Van Essen became a passionate humanitarian. , mentor and heroine for young women in her community.

When she and her husband moved to southwest Florida years later, one of the first things she did was look for a Girl Scout troop for her daughter. “I volunteered to help the leader and a few months later she asked me to take over the troupe in her place,” she says. “I led my daughter’s troupe from third year through high school, with seven of the girls who won the Gold Award, which is the highest award a girl in Girl Scouts can win now.” Van Essen began to take on other county Girl Scout volunteer roles: organizing big events for the girls, training new leaders, continuing to mentor girls in her troop as they headed off to college. In 1997, she was asked to join the staff of the Council, Girl Scouts of Gulfcoast Florida. “Initially, I was responsible for planning events for older Girl Scouts throughout the council that served Manatee County girls in Collier,” she says. “Then my position became more focused on serving girls in our lower income communities of Collier, Lee, Hendry and Glades counties.”

After retiring from her full-time position in 2017, after almost 20 years, Van Essen realized that the Gulfcoast Girl Scout program in Immokalee, a small town northeast of Naples, could not. continue without someone supervising him. The majority of families came from Mexico, Guatemala or Haiti to work in agriculture. Van Essen did not want to see the approximately 230 Girl Scouts of Immokalee, or those who would follow them, lose their chance to participate in the Girl Scouts. So she stayed to continue working with them in her spare time. “Whenever I take the young Girl Scouts from Immokalee to Naples for an event or a trip to the zoo, we also go to the Naples Pier so the girls can hang out and see the Gulf of Mexico, dolphins and pelicans “, she says. . “For more than half of them, it’s the first time they’ve seen the beach, even if they live less than an hour away. And camping is the first time most girls leave the house overnight. I love their excitement when they’re cooking meals, canoeing or archery.”

Van Essen has also taken older Girl Scouts to see our state government at work in Tallahassee, tour the White House (years ago when possible), horseback riding, rafting in North Carolina and even in Pennsylvania to represent our Council. at a major national Girl Scout event where her group of eight girls chose from workshops on STEM topics, career planning, arts, sports and more. “At this event, our group of girls – whose families hailed from Haiti, Mexico and Ecuador, as well as the United States – performed a dance they had carefully choreographed to a mix of popular songs representing each of their cultures,” she says. But by far the most exciting trip for her that she was able to organize was a five-day bus trip where a group of about 25 high school girls were able to visit seven American colleges and participate in sessions with college staff on admissions, financial aid, dormitory life, choosing a major, etc.

“One thing that really moves me is when I hear about a girl who was in one of my Immokalee troops years ago,” says Van Essen. “One of my former students had a scholarship to go to the University of Michigan. She graduated and continued her law studies. She has now passed her bar exam and is practicing law in Michigan. She told me her parents worked long hours to keep food on the table and weren’t interested in the kids having fun. She said she wouldn’t have had a childhood without the Girl Scouts and wouldn’t have learned community service.

Van Essen has stayed in touch with many of her alumni over the years, even as the young girls become successful women, including one who travels the country for her job, one who teaches in North Carolina, one who teaches locally, one who just completed nursing training in New York and one who recently joined the Gulfcoast Girl Scout leadership team in Immokalee. “Hearing about all their successes is what means the most to me,” says Van Essen. The program has finally restarted in-person Girl Scout troops in Immokalee after more than a year of having to trade experiential field trips for Zoom meetings with the girls. “It’s so fun to finally see the girls again,” she says. “I can’t wait to get back to taking them camping and on field trips.”

Apple launches Tap to Pay on iPhone for businesses

Apple announced the launch of Tap to pay in the United States, a new feature that will allow millions of merchants and suppliers in the North American market to use their iPhones to accept Apple Pay and contactless credit and debit cards from major payment networks, including American Express, Discover, Mastercard and Visa.

The move means that all businesses, from small businesses to retailers, will be able to use their devices to accept payments via contactless credit and debit cards and digital wallets via a simple tap on their iPhone.

According to reports, no additional hardware or payment terminals are required to launch the service, enabling instant, seamless and secure payment transactions.

The data suggests that Tap to Pay on iPhone will be available for payment platforms and app developers to integrate into their iOS apps and provide as an additional payment option to their business customers. Additionally, Stripe will be the first payment platform to offer Tap to Pay on iPhone to its business customers, including the Shopify Point of Sale app this spring. Reports also suggest that new payment platforms and service-related apps will follow later this year.

Mobile payment technology and iOS

As soon as Tap to Pay on iPhone becomes available, Apple says merchants will be able to unlock accepting contactless payments through a compatible iOS app on an iPhone XS or later device. “At checkout, the merchant will simply prompt the customer to hold their iPhone or Apple Watch to pay with Apple Pay, their contactless credit or debit card, or other digital wallet near the merchant’s iPhone, and the Payment will be made securely using NFC technology. No additional hardware is required to accept contactless payments via Tap to Pay on iPhone, so businesses can accept payments wherever they do business,” says the latest blog post from the tech giant.

As Apple Pay is currently available at over 90% of US outlets, the new feature will allow customers nationwide to use the facility at most checkouts. The report also states that Tap to Pay on iPhone will roll out to the US Apple Store in the US later this year.

Apple Pay, Tap to Pay and NFC mobile payments

Apple Pay’s new Tap-to-Pay service is made possible through Near Field Communication (NFC) – a technology that has become increasingly common in recent years. The innovation is a form of wireless data transfer similar to radio frequency identification (RFID) technology that allows smartphones, laptops, tablets and other devices to share data in close proximity. NFC technology powers all contactless payments through mobile wallets like Apple Pay, Google Pay, as well as contactless cards.

How does Apple Tap to Pay work?

NFC is limited to sharing data with other devices that are within approximately four inches of proximity. In terms of Apple’s Tap to Pay, at point of sale (POS), the merchant will prompt the customer to hold their own iPhone or Apple Watch, contactless credit or debit card, or other digital wallet to proximity to the merchant’s iPhone, and the payment will be completed securely using NFC technology.

NFC can be used in three ways, namely, peer-to-peer – where two enabled devices can establish a connection and share data, read/write, where a pair of NFC devices, one active and one passive, can retrieve data from each other – and via card emulation, where a smartphone can be used as a contactless payment card.

According to a recent report by Fisglobal, Tap to Pay is simply an evolutionary technology of current innovations. They write: “Digital wallets are a natural extension of the trend for the smartphone to become an all-in-one device that meets all the needs of the modern consumer. The prospect of these consumers ditching their wallets and taking only their smartphones to pay for their purchases is convenience in action.

Digital Energy Journal | Nov-Dec 2021

Nov-Dec 2021



November 2021

LEADERS

Is the industry doing enough to decarbonize? – Discussion on offshore Europe with senior executives from BP, Equinor and Harbor Energy, the International Association of Oil and Gas Producers, the UK Committee on Climate Change and the International Capital Market Association

Technologies at the service of the energy transition – DNV hosted a panel with high level speakers from BP, Equinor, JP Morgan and Corvus Energy

COGNITE “IGNITE TALKS” INDUSTRIAL DIGITIZATION CONFERENCE A

Aker BP’s approach to digital technology – Karl Johnny Hersvik, CEO of oil and gas operator Aker BP, gave a comprehensive overview

Reducing emissions through digital technologies – senior executives from Wintershall Dea, Aker BP and Cognizant shared their insights

Is “digital twin” still a useful term? – Is it time to replace it with a term like “industrial software”, since so many different types of software are called “digital twin” these days?

Make data easier to use for factory workers – A panel from Aarbakke, Forrester and VISMA discusses

How Neptune Energy benefits from digitization – Kaveh Pourteymour, CIO of Neptune Energy, interviewed by John Markus Lervik, CEO of Cognite

Where is digitization going now – Cognite CEO Panel – Aker ASA, Statnett, Hafslund Eco and Cognizant discuss where digitalization is going now

The decarbonization strategies of Wintershall Dea and Lundin – senior executives chat with Cognite CEO John Markus Lervik

Views from BP Senior Vice President Ahmed Hashmi– carbon digital twins, breaking down silos, attracting talent, technology portfolio and data standards

OPERATIONS

Visualization of engineering data on bp’s Mad Dog 2 – how a data visualization and analysis system for process engineering data was implemented

Could the entire industry transact on a single network? – Efforts are underway to develop an “Energy Supply Chain Network” by bringing together several purchasing/supplier networks

Use of digital twins with Coriolis counters in multiphase flow – a way to measure multiphase flow even with gas fractions of 25%. By Aramco Overseas

An accountant’s perspective on oil and gas decarbonization – from Reid Morrison, Global Energy Advisory Leader, Net Zero and ESG, and Global Client Partner, PWC

Secure mission – Top 8 OT Cybersecurity Best Practices

PipelineSentry – create digital twins of pipelines – built using cloud computing and computer game engine technology

Open the magazine (pdf) in a new window

Back to archive

Canned Creations – FORAGE :: SRQ Magazine article by Brittany Mattie

Wish You Were Beer: Expedition of hyper-local breweries and artisanal taprooms of the SRQ to open a flagship beer in a can

Photo by Wyatt Kostygan

CAPITAL CITY: Circus City English-style India Pale Ale; Intercoastal Amber Ale; Conch Republic Key Lime Wheat Ale; Hawaiian Lion Coconut Coffee Porter (not shown); Big Top Brewing Company, 975 Cattleman Rd., Sarasota, 941-371-2939, bigtopbrewing.com, @bigtopbrewco.

CALUSA: The Florida Flavor Hoppy Pilsner (a collaboration with Sarasota lifestyle brand The Florida Flavor); Zote India Pale Ale; Dissonance Breakfast American Brown Ale; Quasimythical Double New England IPA (a collaboration with Sideward Brewing); Calusa Brewing, 5701 Derek Ave., Sarasota, 941-922-8150, calusabrewing.com, @calusabrewing.

DARWIN: Cyan Spirulina Pineapple Sour; Circa 1926 Tangerine Wheat Ale (not pictured); Summadayze west coast style IPA; Darwin Brewing Co., 803 17th Ave. W, Bradenton, 941-747-1970, darwinbrewingco.com, @darwinbrewingco.

MOTORIZATION: Pulp Friction Grapefruit IPA; Intellectual Property American IPA; VTwin Vienna Lager (not shown); 1014 9th St. W, Bradenton, 941-567-6218, motorworksbrewing.com, @motorworksbrewing.

99 BOTTLES: When visiting Suncoast Brewery, be sure to stop by this Southside paradise for a rotating selection of specially selected draft beers. The beauty of these 34 taps of ever-changing craft varieties is that if you can’t find what you’re looking for in the cans of the wall-to-wall selection of packaged takeaways, your draft beer of choice can be poured. in a crowler (32 oz tall aluminum can) after being purged with CO2, then canned on-site by 99 Bottle’s beertenders using a clutch crimper that does the job in seconds approximately. Pack your favorite Florida liquids on tap, take them on the go and open them wherever you want. 99 Bottles Taproom + Bottleshop, 1445 2nd St., Sarasota, 941-487-7874, 99bottles.net, @99bottles.sarasota.

Canned Creations – FORAGE :: SRQ Magazine article by Brittany Mattie





SRQ20 logo

Wish You Were Beer: Expedition of SRQ’s hyper-local breweries and artisan taprooms to open a flagship canned beer

Canned Creations

Photo by Wyatt Kostygan

CAPITAL: Circus City English-style India Pale Ale; Intercoastal Amber Ale; Conch Republic Key Lime Wheat Ale; Hawaiian Lion Coconut Coffee Porter (not shown); Big Top Brewing Company, 975 Cattleman Rd., Sarasota, 941-371-2939, bigtopbrewing.com, @bigtopbrewco.

CALUSA: The Florida Flavor Hoppy Pilsner (a collaboration with Sarasota lifestyle brand The Florida Flavor); Zote India Pale Ale; Dissonance Breakfast American Brown Ale; Quasimythical Double New England IPA (a collaboration with Sideward Brewing); Calusa Brewing, 5701 Derek Ave., Sarasota, 941-922-8150, calusabrewing.com, @calusabrewing.

DARWIN: Cyan Spirulina Pineapple Sour; Circa 1926 Tangerine Wheat Ale (not pictured); Summadayze west coast style IPA; Darwin Brewing Co., 803 17th Ave. W, Bradenton, 941-747-1970, darwinbrewingco.com, @darwinbrewingco.

MOTORIZATION: Pulp Friction Grapefruit IPA; Intellectual Property American IPA; VTwin Vienna Lager (not shown); 1014 9th St. W, Bradenton, 941-567-6218, motorworksbrewing.com, @motorworksbrewing.

99 BOTTLES: While visiting the Suncoast Brewery, be sure to stop by this southern neighborhood haven for a rotating selection of specially selected draft beers. The beauty of these 34 taps of ever-changing craft varieties is that if you can’t find what you’re looking for in the cans of the wall-to-wall selection of packaged takeout items, your draft beer of choice can be poured into a crowler (32 oz tall aluminum can) after being purged with CO2, then canned on-site by 99 Bottle’s beertenders using a clutch-operated crimper that does the job in about seconds. Pack your favorite Florida liquids on tap, take them to go, and open them wherever you like. 99 Bottles Taproom + Bottleshop, 1445 2nd St., Sarasota, 941-487-7874, 99bottles.net, @99bottles.sarasota.

When it translates to fire meat, you know it means business

When it translates to fire meat, you know it means business

André Fabien | February 8, 2022

A mountaineer pancake at C'est La Vie

A mountaineer pancake at C’est La Vie

André Fabien | February 1, 2022

Sale of Restaurant Café L'Europe

Sale of Restaurant Café L’Europe

January 25, 2022

A sandwich worth having from Calu Comfort Food

A sandwich worth having from Calu Comfort Food

André Fabien | January 25, 2022











Synhelion: pioneers of clean energy | Technology Magazine

How is syngas made?

Synhelion uses solar heat to convert CO2 into synthetic fuels. When the sun is shining, the solar radiation is reflected by a mirror field, focused on a receiver and converted into high temperature process heat. The heat generated is routed to the thermochemical reactor which transforms the CO2 and H2O into syngas, a mixture of H2 and CO. The syngas is then transformed into fuels by standard gas-to-liquid technology such as the Fischer-Tropsch process. Synhelion’s technology makes it possible to produce any type of hydrocarbon fuel: jet fuel, gasoline, diesel.

Synhelion has developed thermal energy storage, so that fuel can be produced around the clock and high plant availability is guaranteed. This means that the company will be able to offer solar fuels at prices competitive with fossil fuels. Thermal energy storage is much cheaper and greener than battery storage.

Key Benefits of Solar Fuel Technology

A key advantage of solar fuels is that the technology to produce them does not compete for arable land with agricultural demand and has a smaller land footprint than other synthetic fuel technologies. It requires desert areas with lots of sunlight. These lands are available in many parts of the world. This means that it is possible to scale technology and meet global fuel demand, increase access to clean energy and reduce energy dependence.

Last year, Synhelion raised 16 million Swiss francs in its Series B. Co-founder and CEO Dr. Gianluca Ambrossetti announced the following plans for the company: “We are using this funding to build the world’s first utility-scale solar in the world at Brainergy Park. Jülich in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. We will start producing solar jet fuel there next year.”

By 2025, Synhelion is aiming for a commercial production capacity of 2 million liters of fuel per year and by 2030 the company plans to increase its production capacity to produce 875 million liters of solar fuel, enough to cover around half of Swiss jet fuel demand.

Fascist ideas are on the rise in Italy – International point of view


Such open displays of fascism are illegal in Italy. The Italian Constitution of 1948 prohibits any reconstitution of fascist parties, following the fall of the fascist dictatorship of Benito Mussolini. Of course, fascist groups call each other by other names to avoid prosecution.

Forza Nuova attacks union headquarters

On October 11, 2021, the fascist group Forza Nuova led hundreds of people in an anti-vax demonstration to attack the Rome headquarters of Italy’s largest trade union confederation. For older Italians or those who know their history, it evoked the way Mussolini’s gangs (squadristi) attacked leftist activists and trade unions in the twenties or thirties. It also reminded people of fascist violence, including bombings and shootings, against the victorious struggles waged by the left after the “hot autumn” of 1969. After the October attack, there is had a national response with demonstrations in a number of cities. The government has since shut down their website and their leaders have been questioned by the police.

Fascists attack the headquarters of the CGIL union

The historic leaders of this party are Roberto Fiore and Massimo Morsello. They had links to the violent right-wing terrorist group NAR (Armed Revolutionary Nuclei) and after the Bologna train station massacre in 1980 they both fled to London. They stayed there for 20 years, being granted political refugee status by the Thatcher government. There are strong rumors that the British secret service maintained contact with them. Upon their return to Italy, they were met at the airport by MPs from Berlusconi’s Forza Italia and the National Alliance (AN – the dominant neo-fascist “continuity” party) who were part of a coalition governmental. Both were sentenced to prison but the party was launched and by 2001 it had forty branches and 2,500 members. He won around 0.25% of the vote in the election, but Fiore took over from Alexandra Mussolini when she resigned as an MEP.

CasaPound – punk neo-fascists

CasaPound is a fascist group that began establishing itself in 2003 by occupying empty buildings and using them as “community” cultural and political bases. Over the next 15 years, he opened 106 more centers and established a nationwide presence with regular media coverage. Its main leader is Gianluca Iannone and he described these centers as “territorial reconquests at the service of the people”. This was a new, media-savvy fascist current that stood apart from more traditional fascist parties like Forza Nuova. The new centers have opened gyms, pubs, football clubs, bookstores – even hair salons and tattoo parlours. He tried to present himself as the fascist equivalent of the left and progressive social center (social centres) often located in occupied buildings.

The punk rock band ZetaZetaAlfa (a version of ZeeZeeTop) was a factor in its growing popularity. CasaPound has dealt with housing, student issues, unemployment and social policies. When Beppe Grillo’s centrist populist Five Star movement burst onto the national level, CasaPound was able to win over some of its leaders and activists into engaging with it. CasaPound has also collaborated with Salvini’s Lega Nord to set up sovereignty groups in localities where asylum centers have been set up. Their function was to stir up local animosity towards the migrants who came to settle there. Despite Che Guevara’s postering, its fascist core has remained intact and its militants are as violent as other fascist groups. [1]

the ECN Antifascist Group post a interactive map showing all the hundreds of violent fascist attacks on the left, gays and migrants since 2014. It is updated regularly to show the violence taking place on a weekly basis. Admittedly, these fascist currents are of a different magnitude from what exists in Great Britain.

Fascism creeps into the mainstream

Italian Fascism collapsed under the onslaught of Allied forces and partisans in 1943. Imperialist interests represented by the United States and Britain were very concerned that there would be no vacuum dangerous which could facilitate a new radicalization of a people partially armed and directed by the left. Togliatti and the leadership of the Communist Party implemented Stalin’s line of national unity and reconstruction of the bourgeois state. Nonetheless, the Allies wanted to minimize disruption to the state and its institutions, so the purge of the fascists was extremely limited. Thus, most fascist sympathizers maintained key positions, including in the repressive apparatuses that persist to this day. It is not surprising that fascist support is particularly strong in the Lazio region and in the capital which is the administrative center of the Italian state.

Berlusconi played a central role in normalizing the fascist past. He said Mussolini didn’t kill people and that Italians had to overcome the outdated fascist/anti-fascist dichotomy. Unlike other prime ministers, he did not really participate in the traditional April celebrations of liberation from fascism. Many mainstream media echoed this rewriting of the past, for example, excessive emphasis was placed on the violence committed by partisans against the fascists at the end of the war. His first government in 1994 included the neo-fascist MSI (Italian Social Movement), later renamed AN (National Alliance). The MSI and the AN won around 9% of the vote.

Giorgia Meloni’s Fratelli D’Italia (Brothers of Italy) come from the MSI/AN movement. Like Marine Le Pen in France, she worked hard to deepen this normalization and modernization of neo-fascism. Today, his party is one point ahead of Salvini’s Lega (League) in the polls with 20% and his personal ranking is higher than Salvini’s. She could even claim to be prime minister if her party wins the most votes in the right-wing coalition. This score is double what the MSI obtained 25 years ago. Unlike Salvini, Meloni refused to participate in the national coalition led by unelected banker Draghi. This allows him to capture any discontent or opposition to the government. She has already done it with the obligatory vax pass.

Today, the right-wing coalition is dominated by neo-fascists and Salvini’s right-wing Italians First party. Dominant conservatism in the form of the Christian Democrats collapsed in the corruption pit of the 1980s in Tangentopoli (Bribesville). Initially, Berlusconi’s Trumpian politics filled the space on the right. Today, he has been eclipsed by his most extreme allies. Forza Italia only has around 8% in the polls against 40% for its partners. Salvini and Meloni feed on anti-migrant, pro-traditional family sentiments and fear of crime. The Lega chief is on trial for breaking maritime and human rights laws when Italian ports were closed to a ship full of desperate and sick migrants. He also questioned the importance of anti-fascism as the traditional “glue” of Italian institutions.

Fascist groups and Lega/neo-fascist Fratelli help “normalize” fascism and are in a symbiotic relationship. For example, Forza Nuova security teams help monitor rallies of both major parties. The activists go back and forth and we discover that an ex-fascist joins the Lega, becomes an adviser and then is involved in a violent attack on a migrant. The fascists come out and appear on the electoral lists of the most traditional parties. In turn, the outspoken fascists lead the big gangs of football supporters (the tifosi) that help bring in funds and muscle. Even here, the lines are confused since Salvini has a notorious connection with one of Milan’s tifosi groups.

Years of defeat and decline in the labor movement and the decline of an anti-capitalist left have left an opening for fascist ideas among angry and demoralized people, especially young people. With the implosion and institutionalization of the Five Star movement, the ground is even more favorable for the establishment of reactionary ideas. A sharp rise in poverty and the Covid pandemic have increased the audience for right-wing and racist populism. Anti-vax sentiment has been stronger in Italy than elsewhere and fascists and the hard right also ride this tiger. A victory for the right-wing coalition in the next legislative elections could further embolden them.

Source Anti-capitalist resistance.

Aquatic Vitality – SRQist :: SRQ Magazine article by Brittany Mattie

Vital Wetsuits Keera Belviy Gulf Coaster Channels Surf Durability and Ankle Heat

KEERA BELVIY OF VITAL WETSUITS PRE-SURFING WITH HER LONGBOARD TRAINED BY DIMITRI JANSEN OF SKEG SURF. PHOTOGRAPH BY WYATT KOSTYGAN

We are in the middle of “winter” here on the Gulf Coast. Pleasant temperatures are lively and tangy. The average spring/summer bikini just doesn’t cover enough skin to stay in the water for very long before hair-raising shivers from the extremities invite you to rush out and dry off on the hot, dry sand. But winter water games can be easily solved with an extra layer to trap and insulate the wearer’s body heat with thermal protection. Step into a special type of costume that isn’t worn in boardrooms, but rather on the boards. We are talking about combinations. Zoom into the satellite locally and you’ll find Vital Wetsuits. Founded locally by Gulf Coast Gurfer (girl surfer), Keera Belviy left her long and relentless career as a hairstylist in 2019 to create Vital. “I wanted to free myself to serve a larger purpose/mission that better aligned with my personal aspirations,” Belviy shares.

ETHICAL FASHION, FLATTERING SILHOUETTES AND SPORTY FUNCTIONALITY ARE KEY COMPONENTS OF THE SIGNATURE TERRAZZO SUN RECYCLED BIKINI TOP AND SIGNATURE ECO WETSUIT LEGGINGS

Still struggling to find a well-fitting surf outfit, and not wanting to buy men’s wetsuits that disregarded curves and lack of broad shoulders, his 6ft stature was determined to be that game changer for the surf industry. “Being a tall, full figured woman myself, I was inspired to design jumpsuits and swimsuits that complemented my figure,” says Belviy. “I knew I couldn’t be the only one struggling to find well-fitting water wear. I really find it essential in our times that there is a surf brand that features all women in the water in their truest form.Launched last June, the Vital collection appeals to women of all shapes, sizes and body types, and is specifically designed, with the planet in mind, for Gulf temperatures.

Photo courtesy of @VitalWetsuits, vitalwetsuits.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF @VITALWETSUITS, VITALWETSUITS.COM

In addition to being a body-positive brand, Vital Wetsuits remains conscious of its environmental impact and carbon footprint – shipping anywhere in North America without plastic packaging. “Starting locally, we did a basic Google search for ‘surfboard makers,’ which led us to a rashguard maker here in Florida,” she says. “We politely asked them a few questions and they put us in touch with a wetsuit pattern maker in California. We hired them to make a pattern for our now Signature wetsuit leggings that I could only dream of, and they kindly put in contact with their overseas manufacturer. They were no doubt our impetus to success with overseas manufacturing. Vital committed to a manufacturer who agreed to use Belviy’s preferred and eco-friendly textile she had in mind: Yulex, an FSC-certified renewable material made from rubber trees, and a stretchable alternative to the widely used neoprene (traditional limestone neoprene uses 23 times more kilowatts to manufacture). already have a partnership with Yulex, and as a result, we haven’t had to ‘supply’ them with this sustainable material,” she says. However, due to recent supply chain delays and demand overseas, Belviy has since had to find another more readily available material that is as durable and long-lasting as Yulex, which has now become ‘unsafe’. As winter approached, Belviy and his team quickly discovered another amazing shell-based neoprene alternative. The textile carrying the mermaid is called Bioprene. “We know the fishing industry creates a ton of shellfish by-product waste that can be recycled into bigger things,” she says, “so we have black wetsuit tops made from that. new material, and we should also have new swimwear items for the upcoming summer months!

Beyond the 2mm-thick material that ultimately keeps dents at bay, Vital’s environmental stewardship can be seen in the interior lining, which is made entirely from recycled polyester and laminated with carbon-based glue. water without solvent. Belviy and his team have even encouraged their foreign manufacturers and suppliers to use as little plastic as possible. “Fortunately, we were able to reduce a ton of plastic waste by requesting that our goods be grouped together in larger quantities, instead of individually wrapped,” she explains. “Even when we ship our goods to our customers, we don’t use any plastic packaging, just paper. And the tape we use is cellulose-based and biodegradable. As eco-friendly as Vital’s collection is from start to finish thin, it doesn’t hurt that it’s also functional and fashionable.The simple yet elegant black designs, equipped with convenient key pockets and that grease-like thermal barrier, Vital proves its vitality for winter wardrobe essentials and women’s water adventures.Whether it’s paddleboarding, wakeboarding, diving or surfing, when the next cold snap of the season hits and the temperature rises. water drops below 70°F, you’ll never again have to complain that your ankles are too cold to hang on for another hour of immersion.

Driving a Future – City of Culture :: SRQ Magazine article by Andrew Fabian

It’s on and up for the Sarasota Orchestra and its new music director Bramwell Tovey

Getting in tune with the Sarasota Orchestra’s new Designated Music Director, Bramwell Tovey. Photo courtesy of the Sarasota Orchestra.

When Bramwell Tovey moved to Sarasota in the fall to take on his new role as Music Director of the Sarasota Orchestra, he moves to a town long revered as a top destination for retirees, a town famed as a place where people can ease off the accelerator and enjoy their twilight years. During a visit to Sarasota last February where he performed as a guest conductor, Tovey remembers getting off the plane – which landed from Vancouver – and thinking: what’s not to like? If he wished, he could bring his 40+ years of experience into his role with a well-established, well-funded organization and ride the wave of his existing momentum towards a comfortable sunset.

Tovey and the Sarasota Orchestra don’t have such lukewarm aspirations.

Both he and the orchestra experienced a similar existential melting pot through 2020 and 2021, the latter during a canceled season, the former during a cancer crisis. “Coming out of the pandemic and overcoming some health challenges during this time, I feel like my career is entering an exciting new chapter,” says Tovey. And this momentum born from the crises bodes well for an organization that is opening its own new chapter. Before Tovey’s arrival, the orchestra was already on the verge of major moves. Amidst all the gleaming construction downtown and The Bay project, the organization finds itself in search of a dedicated, permanent home – a search that Tovey is well suited for with his experience helping both the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra and the Orchester Philharmonie de Luxembourg site and build concert halls. “With the Vancouver Concert Hall, I was involved from the start,” Tovey explains, “and it enriched my understanding of how to build a space that gives a sympathetic account of the sound you produce.”

Although his expert ears will certainly come in handy when he plans a new concert hall and his musical pedigree promises to carry on the orchestra’s legacy of excellence – his resume is simply too long to fit on the page – these are the social and personal responsibilities that Tovey is the most enthusiastic to assume. “Since the pandemic, there’s been this big push for more diversity and inclusion in the arts,” he says, “and that’s something that I’m excited to champion.” According to him, diversity has only improved the quality and style of classical music. “Three or four decades ago there was a harshness and abrasiveness that is considered old-fashioned in classical music today,” he says, “and I think orchestras have become more creative and constructive as that they have become more inclusive”.

To that end, Tovey hopes to get out into the community and encourage historically unsolicited populations into the world of classical music. As artistic advisor to the Rhode Island Philharmonic, he oversaw programs that provided musical instruments to underserved communities. “I love getting out in the community and getting my hands dirty, so to speak,” he says, “and I think that’s a way for us to give back and do our bit to improve equity, especially trying to attract more African American and Hispanic musicians to enter the field.

Long before beginning to develop initiatives to this end, however, Tovey would make several trips to Sarasota that would provide him with his first opportunities to leave a lasting mark on the orchestra. Throughout the year, Tovey will oversee auditions to fill out the roster – and the importance of such an undertaking is not lost on him. “The orchestra has already had a fantastic last decade of recruiting,” he says, “but whoever I select to fill these vacancies will be with the orchestra for a long time. These are important decisions. Still, Tovey won’t be “planting the garden from scratch,” he says. The orchestra’s current staff certainly already possess tremendous talent. “When I came in mid-February last year to conduct a very difficult piece with the orchestra, I was delighted to see how well prepared they were,” says Tovey, “there is a great energy and they are all very enthusiastic.”

But it was the administrative and organizational side of operations that Tovey said really completed the allure of taking the job. “It’s run with artistic excellence, of course,” he says, “but it’s also run with financial responsibility. There’s no reason to be great if you’re broke, and Joe [McKenna] and I feel the same way about how these two should balance each other. All in all, Tovey and the orchestra are practically buzzing with excitement as they look ahead to a promising year despite the continued presence of the pandemic. The visceral, emotional experience that Tovey has facilitated throughout his career now has the added fuel of a deeply personal resurgence, a yearning for the sweet sound of a symphony.

“The orchestra is an incredible invention that I’ve been blessed with for so long,” he says. “But after going through cancer and canceling shows, I come back to it with a heightened appreciation. The sound really wraps around you and moves the spirit. I find myself more energized by it than I have been. for quite some time, and I’m more than excited to share this with the Sarasota audience.

Neo-Modern Nest – Maison & Design :: SRQ Magazine article by Abby Weingarten

The design of the posh Sarasota residence—located on a 21,605 square foot lot on the corner of a waterfront street—began in January 2018 and construction was completed in February 2019. Solidly built in 1968, the existing 6,364 square foot home was equipped with four bedrooms and five-and-a-half-baths, but the owner has set out to reinvent the interiors in a more contemporary style (to complement their very eclectic art collection). Echt-Architects worked closely with the owner to realize this vision and enlisted the expertise of interior designer Marie Bowman, ASID, NCIDQ; and general contractor Nathan Cross.

“The owners love how the house has been transformed to better suit them and reflect their tastes, passions and lifestyle,” says architect Andrew Etter of Echt-Architects. A multitude of additions and creative renovations would eventually refresh the great room, upstairs bedroom, family room, kitchen, living room, bar, studio, bathroom, stairs and balcony. The main goals of the renovation were to modernize the entire space, harmonize the angles and heights of the house, make the oversized entryway and living room more welcoming, add an artist and maximize the views of downtown Sarasota across the bay from Bird Key. The refreshed spaces are now open to each other and outward from the bay, with large format concrete-look porcelain tiles blending the spaces. The large walnut-stained wooden front door welcomes guests into the living room with its custom concrete fireplace surround (with tapered edges) and walnut paneled trumeau. A wide threshold overlooks the dining room and the open kitchen dazzles with its rich walnut and lacquer finishes. An elegant staircase, with a central stringer and wooden block steps, brings visitors upstairs to the impressive guest suites. Next to the family room, a custom concrete bar counter with waterfall and tapered detailing provides plenty of space for relaxation and recreation. The bedroom, like the rest of the house, is both luxurious and livable.

ARCHITECT ANDREW ETTER OF ECHT-ARCHITECTS. INTERIOR DESIGNER MARIE BOWMAN, ASID, NCIDQ AND GENERAL CONTRACTOR NATHAN CROSS.

Before the renovation of the project, the living room was rarely used, and it was described as too large and difficult to furnish,” explains architect Kortnee Gonzalez, NCARB, of Echt-Architects. “Through layers of architectural elements, including a new fireplace with a floating concrete hearth, balanced by a soaring wooden ceiling element, we were able to give the space a sense of scale (as well as an inviting focal point, but also allows you to still appreciate the incredible view just outside the sliding glass doors). This inviting warmth and livability extends to every facet of the home, such as the utilitarian and eye-catching kitchen. “The continuity of the materials helps tie the spaces together,” Gonzalez explains. “Glossy kitchen cabinets and a mirrored bar backsplash reflect the incredible water views and allow site appreciation even while seated facing out.” Incorporating design elements that would expertly showcase the owner’s art collection was paramount. “We worked closely with the client, contractor and interior designer to blend the owner’s existing furniture with new elements, achieve a playful large-scale look and allow the client’s art collection to shine,” says Gonzalez.

Bowman was essential to this execution. “We kept the interior wall paint pure white to allow the client’s artwork to really stand out,” says Bowman. “A museum-quality light fixture highlights the statue of the client on the staircase and creates a beautiful play of shadows dancing on the walls.” Not only was the handling and appreciation of the owner’s artistry an essential part of the renovation (to be preserved for present and future generations), but longevity was an overall theme throughout the project. With this in mind, the design team focused on eco-responsible and sustainable materials. The flooring comes from a manufacturer with a strong commitment to sustainable practices and low emissions. The wood selection features a natural oil finish with no added chemicals to promote healthier indoor air quality. And the main tile flooring has a GreenGuard Gold certification for reduced total volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. “Caesarstone® kitchen countertops incorporate up to 42 percent recycled quartz, which offsets waste in landfills,” says Bowman. “These countertops never need to be sealed and are non-porous so they don’t harbor any bacteria, mold or mildew, and they stay safe and hygienic for ultimate cleanliness.”

Echt Architects, 1058 N Tamiami Trl Suite 108-255, Sarasota, 941-302-3490, echt-architects.com, @echtarchitects.

ECHT ARCHITECTS, 1058 N TAMIAMI TRL SUITE 108-255, SARASOTA, 941-302-3490, ECHT-ARCHITECTS.COM, @ECHTARCHITECTS.

Knowing that the house combines elements of past and present – ​​from its exaltation of timeless artistry to its penchant for cutting-edge, planet-friendly finishes – was a particularly interesting aspect of the project for Echt’s team. -Architects. “The most rewarding part [of a project] begins to explore the juxtaposition between contemporary and traditional elements, which is always exciting for us,” says Etter. This is something that the Echt-Architects team has appreciated on several projects. Founded in 2016, Echt-Architects is a full-service architectural firm dedicated to design “that contributes significantly to the built environment”, say the firm’s founders. Etter has led teams of architects and designers on projects in Japan, the Middle East and across the United States, and he has spent more than a decade working with world renowned architect Richard Landry. Gonzalez has dedicated his career to designing and managing high-end custom residential projects at every stage, from conceptual sketches to construction.

The company has won numerous awards and accolades for its residences along the Manatee River, Casey Key, Little Sarasota Bay, Roberts Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. Whether the Echt-Architects team is designing a high-rise condominium or a coastal mansion, designers know how to maximize indoor-outdoor living spaces and sea views, while taking into account the history of the respective landscape. and of the relationship of architecture with this . “We work with our customers to fully understand their lifestyle, their needs and their desires”, explain the founders of the company. “By honoring each client’s visions, together we can embark on a unique journey that leads to architecture that endures and inspires.” The renovated Bird Key house is just one example.

Neo-Modern Nest – Maison & Design :: SRQ Magazine article by Abby Weingarten

Award-winning and impressive, a recent home renovation by Echt-Architects of Sarasota embodies neo-modern magic on Bird Key

The design of the posh Sarasota residence—located on a 21,605 square foot lot on the corner of a waterfront street—began in January 2018 and construction was completed in February 2019. Solidly built in 1968, the existing 6,364 square foot home was equipped with four bedrooms and five-and-a-half baths, but the owner has set out to reinvent the interiors in a more contemporary style (to complement their very eclectic art collection). Echt-Architects worked closely with the owner to realize this vision and enlisted the expertise of interior designer Marie Bowman, ASID, NCIDQ; and general contractor Nathan Cross.

“The owners love how the house has been transformed to better suit them and reflect their tastes, passions and lifestyle,” says architect Andrew Etter of Echt-Architects. A multitude of additions and creative renovations would eventually refresh the great room, upstairs bedroom, family room, kitchen, living room, bar, studio, bathroom, stairs and balcony. The main objectives of the renovation were to modernize the entire space, harmonize the angles and heights of the house, make the oversized entrance area and living room more welcoming, add a artist and maximizing views of downtown Sarasota across the bay from Bird Key. The refreshed spaces are now open to each other and outward to the bay, with large-format concrete-look porcelain tiles blending the spaces. The large walnut stained wooden front door welcomes guests into the living room with its custom concrete fireplace surround (with tapered edges) and walnut paneled trumeau. A large threshold overlooks the dining room and the open kitchen dazzles with its rich walnut and lacquer finishes. An elegant staircase, with a central stringer and wooden block steps, brings visitors upstairs to the impressive guest suites. Next to the family room, a custom concrete bar top with waterfall and tapered detailing provides plenty of space for relaxation and recreation. The room, like the rest of the house, is both luxurious and livable.

Architect Andrew Etter of Echt-Architects.  Interior designer Marie Bowman, ASID, NCIDQ and general contractor Nathan Cross.

ARCHITECT ANDREW ETTER OF ECHT-ARCHITECTS. INTERIOR DESIGNER MARIE BOWMAN, ASID, NCIDQ AND GENERAL CONTRACTOR NATHAN CROSS.

Before the renovation of the project, the living room was rarely used, and it was described as too large and difficult to furnish,” explains architect Kortnee Gonzalez, NCARB, of Echt-Architects. “Through layers of architectural elements, including a new fireplace with a floating concrete hearth, balanced by a soaring wooden ceiling element, we were able to give the space a sense of scale (as well as an inviting focal point but also allows one to still appreciate the incredible view just outside the sliding glass doors). This inviting warmth and livability extends to every facet of the home, such as the utilitarian and eye-catching kitchen. “The continuity of the materials helps tie the spaces together,” Gonzalez explains. “Glossy kitchen cabinets and a mirrored bar backsplash reflect the incredible water views and make it possible to appreciate the site even while sitting facing the outdoors.” Incorporating design elements that would expertly showcase the owner’s art collection was paramount. “We worked closely with the client, contractor and interior designer to blend the owner’s existing furniture with new elements, achieve a large-scale playful look and allow the client’s art collection to shine,” says Gonzalez.

Bowman was essential to this execution. “We kept the interior wall paint pure white to allow the client’s artwork to really pop,” says Bowman. “A museum-quality light fixture highlights the client’s statue on the stairs and creates a beautiful play on the shadows dancing on the walls.” Not only was the handling and appreciation of the owner’s artistry an essential part of the renovation (to be preserved for present and future generations), but longevity was an overall theme throughout the project. With this in mind, the design team focused on eco-responsible and sustainable materials. The flooring comes from a manufacturer with a strong commitment to sustainable practices and low emissions. The wood selection features a natural oil finish with no added chemicals to promote healthier indoor air quality. And the main tile flooring has a GreenGuard Gold certification for reduced total volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. “Caesarstone® kitchen countertops incorporate up to 42% recycled quartz which offsets waste in landfills,” says Bowman. “These countertops never need to be sealed and are non-porous, so they don’t harbor any bacteria, mold or mildew, and they stay safe and hygienic for ultimate cleanliness.”

Echt Architects, 1058 N Tamiami Trl Suite 108-255, Sarasota, 941-302-3490, echt-architects.com, @echtarchitects.

ECHT ARCHITECTS, 1058 N TAMIAMI TRL SUITE 108-255, SARASOTA, 941-302-3490, ECHT-ARCHITECTS.COM, @ECHTARCHITECTS.

Knowing that the house combines elements of past and present – ​​from its exaltation of timeless artistry to its penchant for cutting-edge, planet-friendly finishes – was a particularly interesting aspect of the project for the Echt team. -Architects. “The most rewarding part [of a project] begins to explore the juxtaposition between contemporary and traditional elements, which is always exciting for us,” says Etter. This is something the team at Echt-Architects have relished over several projects. Founded in 2016, Echt-Architects is a full-service architectural firm dedicated to design “that contributes significantly to the built environment”, say the firm’s founders. Etter has led teams of architects and designers on projects in Japan, the Middle East and across the United States, and he has spent more than a decade working with world renowned architect Richard Landry. Gonzalez has dedicated his career to designing and managing high-end custom residential projects at every stage, from conceptual sketches to construction.

The company has won numerous awards and accolades for its residences along the Manatee River, Casey Key, Little Sarasota Bay, Roberts Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. Whether the Echt-Architects team is designing a high-rise condominium or a coastal mansion, designers know how to maximize indoor-outdoor living spaces and sea views, while taking into account the history of the respective landscape and of the relationship of architecture with this. “We work with our customers to fully understand their lifestyle, needs and desires,” explain the company’s founders. “By honoring each client’s visions, together we can embark on a unique journey that leads to architecture that endures and inspires.” The renovated Bird Key house is just one example.

Friendly skies – Feature :: SRQ magazine article by Jacob Ogles

SRQ Airport may well be the fastest growing airport in the world. Now leaders are booking plans for a bigger future

Passenger traffic was already on the rise at Sarasota-Bradenton International Airport in early 2020, but the coronavirus changed everything. COVID-19 has impacted all sectors of the economy, but travel has taken a particular hit. At an airport that handled just under 2 million passenger flights in 2019, traffic in April 2020 fell to less than 10,000 passengers, with the bulk of those departing the city.

“The thought was how do we get through this?” recalls the CEO of SRQ airport, Fredrick Piccolo. “How can we reduce as much as possible?” But that was then. Less than two years later, the traffic is bigger than ever. Airlines that halted flights to Sarasota years ago have re-routed routes to SRQ airstrips. A new terminal is under construction as part of a $60 million expansion and Sarasota is the envy of the aviation world. “The growth at SRQ has been phenomenal,” said Piccolo. “We are the fastest growing airport in the United States, if not the world. Traffic was up 150% from last year, and yes it was a COVID year, but for us the numbers haven’t really gone down. Well, a close look at the numbers shows that total traffic has fallen from 1.96 million passenger flights in 2019 to 1.24 million in 2020, but that kind of drop is nothing compared to what many airports around the world have suffered. While SRQ traffic was down 37%, traffic in and out of Atlanta International Airport was down nearly 43%. At Miami International Airport, it fell 59%.

Regardless, at the start of 2021, the airport remained healthy with steady growth in flights. Not a single airport employee has ever been laid off — private airlines don’t disclose their location-specific layoffs — but Piccolo told airlines to call to find out how to add routes into the facility . In September, the airport topped 2 million passenger flights for the year for the first time in its history with three months of travelers still to take off. Piccolo recalls that just three years ago the airport felt comfortable closing the year with just under 1.4 million passenger flights. Now the airport executive in November hoped to reach 2.5 million passengers through the airport before the end of the calendar year. So what prompted this? Piccolo said it’s hard to ignore Florida’s statewide policies in response to the pandemic. As Florida, like many states, entered a month-long lockdown in the spring of 2020, it quickly began a process of reopening. Governor Ron DeSantis announced in September 2020 a major marketing campaign funded by Visit Florida to encourage travel to the state, and Florida’s policies have been widely publicized in national media as far less restricted than other states. As DeSantis blasted criticism from public health advocates on national airwaves, business leaders in a state where tourism is the No. 1 industry announced the move.

    Looking back on a monumental year, SRQ Airport CEO Fredrick Piccolo rejoices in the continued success of the nation's fastest growing airport.

LOOKING AT A MONUMENTAL YEAR, SRQ AIRPORT CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER FREDRICK PICCOLO LOOKS FORWARD TO THE CONTINUED SUCCESS OF THE FASTEST GROWING AIRPORT IN THE COUNTRY.

Virginia Haley, president of Visit Sarasota, said this market also benefits because many amenities here are outdoors. From beaches to popular kayaking routes, ecotourism has become more popular than ever as travelers seek ways to get out of their homes without traveling to destinations with indoor entertainment, environments at higher risk of seeing virus infections. spread. Piccolo said it spurred a spike in recreational tourism. “When social distancing started, we had lots of beaches, golf, fishing, just lots of outdoor activities. The fact that the Governor has kept our state open has brought tremendous economic activity. And as you and I both know, this place is wonderful. This place is heavenly. But what’s most shocking about the growth of SRQ Airport is that it has outstripped expansions happening anywhere in Florida or beyond. It has to do with the type of travel the airport relies on more than ever. The Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association announced that Florida’s tourism industry expects to see a loss of $5.3 billion in business travel for 2021, which has had consequences across the state as even as leisure travel came back into force in Florida the same year. This loss of conventions and business travel represents the second largest loss in the country.

“Sarasota is a little different from many parts of the state because it’s always been dominated by leisure travel,” Haley said. From October 2020 to September, Sarasota County raised $27.6 million in tourism development taxes, a record amount for a fiscal year. This happened even as large convention spaces remained vacant as hotel pools were still teeming with vacationing families. So can it last? Piccolo predicts that at some point leisure travel will stabilize. Pent-up demand on lockdown days will decline. Family reunions postponed for a year will take place and a normal level of recreational visitors will return. Hopefully business travel will also return to steady levels. There are already signs of this with spaces booking hybrid conventions and more and more business travelers relishing the opportunity to network in person again.

An international travel ban, one of the most enduring restrictions of the pandemic era, was finally lifted in early November. Visitors from outside the United States have historically made up 10% of travelers to the airport, so the airport is excited to get its customs inspections back up and running. But Piccolo said it wouldn’t be an immediate rebound. Air Canada, the airport’s biggest source of international travelers, won’t begin flights to Sarasota until this fall. “They were originally supposed to come back in February, but Customs and Borders still doesn’t have enough staff in Toronto,” Piccolo said. But in fairness, Piccolo said a decline in leisure travel won’t necessarily hurt the airport. “It might give us time to breathe,” he said. No one expects another total lockdown like what the country experienced when COVID-19 was still a new virus. A drop right now could help the airport manage and catch up on its infrastructure.

Whenever new travel arrives, SRQ Airport should be more than ready for it, just as it will soon be able to handle a lot more domestic travel than it currently sees. The airport has already launched a $60 million expansion of facilities, including the construction of a brand new terminal. In August, the Sarasota-Manatee Airport Authority hired DeAngelis Diamond-Magnum Builders to construct a new concourse. It will be a ground floor passenger terminal with five new gates. The expansion also includes the construction of four more temporary parking lots and a new baggage claim and ground check-in area. This will mean more jobs in the region, even beyond the 40 new jobs added by the airport this year to cope with the existing travel boom.

Meanwhile, airlines are interested in planning routes and grabbing space in the still small airport. And the SRQ is reconnecting with previously unrecognized private partners in these regions. Southwest Airlines, for example, has flights to and from the airport every day. The airline returned to Sarasota in February and now has three gates and 19 nonstop destinations connected to SRQ.

It’s quite a shock considering that a decade ago Piccolo was outright asking business groups not to fly southwest after the airline shut down AirTran, an airline subsidy, to the airport. Piccolo plays down the acrimony today. “I wouldn’t call it bad blood,” he says, “but it was a disappointment.” The decision to close AirTran came shortly after Southwest-branded flights halted service to Sarasota, leading to a double bite that has plagued the airport for years. “We didn’t think it was the right decision at the time.”

That’s in the past now, and SRQ has good relationships with all the major carriers. “We always kept the lines of communication open,” says Piccolo. It didn’t take long last year to convince unconverted people that Sarasota was the place to fly. Now the only problem is finding space for everyone who needs a place to land.

Digital regulation at the service of research and education

Today, there is an empty spot in EU digital regulation: education and research. The digital transition has and is already having a profound impact on these activities, as well as the ambitions of universities to make knowledge widely accessible.

Universities across Europe have been quick to move their learning and teaching online during the pandemic, but digitalization won’t stop with digitally enhanced learning. Similarly in research and innovation, the importance of data-driven science has increased over the last decades, starting with disciplines such as particle physics or biomedicine and more recently also in the social sciences. and human. The current pandemic is one of the best examples of the rise of big data and, more importantly, the guarantee of its sharing. It was a turning point that demonstrated that only the global openness of data allowed researchers and innovators to deploy vaccines and deliver adaptable public health measures.

Open Science is a movement paving the way for the open availability of research results for all and the promotion of full access, sharing and reuse of data and protocols. More generally, it is a fundamental driver of universities’ mission in society at large and their ability to cooperate in solving global challenges like climate change or the next pandemic.

“Digital and research policy makers need to be aware of the conflicts and obstacles on the path to open science”

The European University Association recent open science survey demonstrated the strategic importance of open science for European universities, with more than half of the institutions surveyed rating it as very high or high importance for their strategy. But while open access to research publications was of great importance to 90% of institutions, only 60% considered its level of implementation to be high enough.

Furthermore, this gap widens in data-related areas where implementation remains much weaker. To specifically achieve open access, institutional repositories – digital platforms or archives where research created within a university and made available and accessible with little or no barriers – are considered the most common and more important. Yet European legislation such as the Digital Services Act (DSA) could severely hamper, if not completely stifle, universities’ efforts to share science widely through institutional repositories. If nothing is done, the DSA would overload them with unnecessary legal, administrative and financial constraints.

The private sector can also create a barrier to sharing research results for the benefit of society when it chooses to intervene. Recently, publishers have attempted to establish criteria that are too restrictive in their advice to researchers in choosing a repository to manage, share and preserve their data. Stakeholders in the research community have expressed concerns about the nature of the proposed set of criteria. There are also questions about the lack of transparency in how scholarly publishers allow researchers to use open data. This may conflict with what universities or funding bodies recommend. It remains important to strengthen and expand the existing repository ecosystem and encourage the adoption of best practices, but researchers must have real choice, including the ability to choose institutional, national, community-run domain or generalists. Policy makers in the digital and research fields need to be aware of the conflicts and obstacles on the path to open science.

“Higher education and research in Europe have specific values ​​that must be protected, especially from the control of big technology companies”

More broadly, universities also plan to implement digital data management and collection tools that will help them grow and improve, just like any other sector. However, higher education and research in Europe have specific values ​​that need to be protected, especially against the control of big technology companies. With e-learning and digital management, the possibilities for data collection and monitoring are increasing, with perhaps a European education or skills data space as a consequence. Here, the control and ownership of this data becomes a relevant issue. Who will have access to data on the learning behavior of Europe’s 20 million students? Should we know how often they click a mouse during an online course, whether their eye movement suggests they are paying attention or not, or whether they should be labeled as “problematic” or “at risk” by an algorithm? Should learning data be available for private providers, such as large for-profit online platforms, to sell credentials? Should big tech companies be able to use them for their own training programs? These are big questions of concern to universities, which benefit from digital services but must remain in control. Research and education data is not like any other data space, it depends on individual values ​​and life choices. The Digital Markets Act is a good step towards securing a competitive market for digital services, and the Artificial Intelligence Act sets limits on the use of AI in education. However, systematic attention should be given across digital regulation to research and education, and to the specific needs of the institutions performing these functions.

This raises two questions: first, how does regulation impede access to knowledge? Is the legislation appropriate for the type of entities that ensure that scientific knowledge is accessible to all? Second, how can we ensure that human values ​​guide education and research, and that digitalization gives private companies the opportunity to serve, but not control and direct, what we know and how we learn? These issues need to be addressed as part of the debate on Europe’s digital transformation.


This article reflects the views of the author and not the views of The Parliament Magazine or the Dods Group

Osundare is a cover poet, headliner of the 5th World Poetry magazine

POET, scholar and public intellectual, Professor Niyi Osundare has been selected as the cover poet and headliner of the 5th edition of ‘World Poetry’, a magazine of the World Poetry Movement.

Executive Deputy Secretary General of China’s Boao International Poetry Festival and Deputy Editor-in-Chief of “World Poetry” Cao Shui announced Osundare’s selection on January 15.

A selection of poems by the recently retired English professor from the University of New Orleans, USA, will be published in the fifth edition of ‘World Poetry’.

With his selection, Professor Osundare became the first African poet honored by the international poetry journal.

Commenting on his selection, Osundare thanked the World Poetry Movement for the honor.

Born in Ikere-Ekiti, Ekiti State in 1947, Professor Osundare was educated at the University of Ibadan, University of Leeds and York University, Toronto, Canada .

Her poetry collections include “City Without People: The Katrina Poems”, “Random Blues”, “Days”, “The Word Is an Egg”, “Midlife”, “Waiting Laughters”, “Moonsongs”, and “The Eye of the Earth”. ‘ among others.

Professor Osundare has won awards and prizes including Association of Nigerian Authors (ANA) Prize, Cadbury/ANA Prize, Commonwealth Poetry Prize, Noma Prize, Tchicaya U Tam’si Prize for African poetry and the Fonlon/Nichols Prize. Award for “Excellence in literary creativity associated with significant contributions to human rights in Africa”. He received the 2014 Nigerian National Merit Award.

He was a columnist for Newswatch and had poetry columns in the Sunday Tribune, the rested newspaper NEXT and The Nation.

MSME Growth Summit – UP Edition


MSMEs are the growth engines of states as they contribute heavily to the economy of the state. However, the COVID pandemic has had a negative impact on the sector and economic activities have been interrupted due to closures. To help MSMEs through the difficult times, the government of Uttar Pradesh has put in place various programs and policies to improve the ease of doing business in the state. Highlighting the role of MSMEs in the creation of UP Aatmanirbhar, Elets Technomedia together with Meta organized a virtual summit – MSME Growth Summit – Uttar Pradesh edition.

“Leveraging technology to improve sales and customer experience”

Kumar Vineet, Special Secretary (IT), Government of Uttar Pradesh

Kumar Vinet, The Special Secretary (IT) of the Government of Uttar Pradesh said, “The Government of Uttar Pradesh has come up with a program which creates specialized handicraft products. For example, kala namak rice, ancient traditions of zari and zardozi or chikankari, glassware or bed sheet or jaggery, we have tried to achieve a geographical identification mark with these products. Uttar Pradesh is trying to build a technology platform to reach customers and allow MSMEs to access larger markets, he added.

Expressing that the fundamental motive is accessibility to market and finance, Vineet said, “The product should be artistically made so that the packaging looks better. We need to do a good geolocation, with a good presentation of the products and easy access to the marketplaces for the products. Moreover, we need to improve the interaction between market players as well as consumers. »

On improving the customer experience, he said, “To improve the customer experience and facilitate communication, we need to create a one-stop shop where people can interact individually… Additionally, we are leveraging technologies such as AI and the Internet of Things (IoT) to develop chatbots that further facilitate communications with consumers. Adding, he said, “There are three main focus areas where technology plays a key role, firstly, to provide a good platform that is easy and accessible to every industry. Second, to develop an interactive platform between the consumer and the manufacturer, and the third improves accessibility.

“MSMEs are the country’s growth engines”

Sarveswar Shukla

Sarveshwar Shukla, Co-Commissioner, Industries, Government of Uttar Pradesh

Sarveswar Shukla, Co-Commissioner, Industries, Government of Uttar Pradesh, said during his address that MSMEs are the engine of growth in the country and major contributors to economic activities and revenue. The state of Uttar Pradesh has established many programs such as One District One Product (ODOP) for the overall development of the MSME sector in the state.

Speaking on how the UP government is helping MSMEs, he said, “We are not treating Uttar Pradesh as a state but as a small country. In terms of MSMEs, UP ranks first in India. We have developed enabling policies and are helping investors and businesses to come to the state. We have Nivesh Mitra which is an online system, where any investor can apply for various permissions, licenses needed to set up an organization in the state. Additionally, in 2020, the UP government proposed the MSME Act 2020 which has proven to be a game-changer for the MSME sector.

“We also have monthly grievance meetings under the Udyog Bandhu at district level. Challenges are resolved through these meetings. The government is working to improve the ease of doing business in UP across all sectors. With extensive expertise in each district, ODOP’s flagship program is successfully implemented at UP. Following the success of ODOP, the Center also plans to replicate the program across the country. There are many other programs in development in the state,” Shukla added.

Optimizing the marketing of MSME products using ICT

Vidyasagar Singh

Vidyasagar Singh, Managing Director, National Small Industries Corporation (NSIC)

During his remarks, Vidyasagar Singh, Managing Director of the National Small Industries Corporation (NSIC), pointed out that the MSME sector produces excellent products with many local artisans that need to be further enhanced with the help of technology, ICT and better marketing.

“I think a priority area should be to improve technology penetration in the MSME sector. Such development could yield better results and enable MSMEs and our local craftsmen and artisans to reach larger markets,” he said.

Singh expressed interest in working with the UP government to come up with better programs for MSMEs. He said, “NSIC has offices all over India and we offer tailor-made programs. So if we join hands, we would be able to come up with better projects. We reached out to state governments to empower MSMEs and many of them expressed interest in developing a web portal to improve the reach and visibility of MSMEs in their states. »

He said that the Secretary of Ministry of MSMEs, Government of India announced that NSIC’s msmemart.com will be treated as a nodal portal for B2B marketing activities providing support to MSMEs. “We are also planning global reach through technology. NSIC has launched a new ICT-enabled digital services program and has already partnered with many leading service providers. With various subsidized rate schemes, we are reaching the masses,” he added.

E-commerce: a boon for MSMEs

Hasan Yaqoob, CII Uttar Pradesh E-Commerce Council

Hasan Yaqoob, CII Uttar Pradesh E-Commerce Council

Hasan Yaqoob, Chairman, eCommerce Council CII, Uttar Pradesh and Associate Director, Flipkart Group, said, “I would like to report to you that our Honorable Prime Minister Narendra Modi has launched so many initiatives including but not limit, Skill India. , Digital India which all benefit MSMEs. Nowadays, due to the growing penetration of e-commerce in the country, India’s rural belt is very much aware of its reach across India, without the need for cash or at least. This is the biggest advantage of e-commerce. It also plays a crucial role in improving product marketing. E-commerce has played an important role in the national market, and e-commerce companies like Flipkart have programs where we help local artisans and craftsmen to get a prepared catalog for their products for free.

If a person intends to sell a product on an e-commerce store, they have to pay GST, which the government benefits greatly from. Flipkart has developed a program called ‘Flipkart Samarth’ to showcase the work of local artisans in the state of Uttar Pradesh. The entire artisan and artisan community greatly benefits from the program. The Flipkart Samarth also helped them become entrepreneurs at a low-cost module. The program has benefited various communities, including non-governmental organizations (NGOs), people with special disabilities, etc. We are also in talks with the government of Uttar Pradesh for export promotion, he added.

Need to create a convenient business ecosystem for MSMEs

Gaurav Srivastava, EY

Gaurav Srivastava, Principal Consultant, Ernst & Young Global Consulting Services

Gaurav Srivastava, Principal Consultant, Ernst & Young Global Consulting Services, said that with the aim of holding MSMEs and developing a convenient business ecosystem for the sector; the government has launched programs like One District One Product (ODOP), Prime Minister Employment Generation Program (PMEGP). Policy intervention and convergence are key to MSME growth.

“In 2020, the government of Uttar Pradesh changed the manufacturing policy where we assume the investment should be around Rs 40,000 crore and recently we also changed the startup policy, where we expect 10,000 startups and an incubation center in every district of the state,” he added.

Expressing his opinion on improving and empowering the business ecosystem in Uttar Pradesh, Srivastava said, “I think like other cities, we should also spend more money on entrepreneurship as well only for education. We should come up with initiatives on how we can give small startups a comfort zone. ODOP has been instrumental in capacity building, with major agencies and has been instrumental in uplifting MSMEs in the state. »

While highlighting improved market reach with the help of e-commerce stores, Srivastava said, “We sold Rs 1,000 crore worth of products on Flipkart alone.” In terms of technology, ODOP does a great job.
“We need to have cluster incubation centers for seamless work. We need to understand to our capacity what we can do to make Uttar Pradesh a profitable business ecosystem for MSMEs,” he said .

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Eletsonline News




Lidl Switzerland launches the Nutri-Score for private label products

Lidl Switzerland introduced Nutri-Score the labeling of certain private label products to help consumers make more informed purchases and choose healthier food options.

Voluntary labeling indicates the nutritional balance of a product’s composition on a scale from A to E, and has been widely used in France since its introduction in 2017.

In Switzerland, the Federal Office for Food Safety and Veterinary Affairs (USAV) ​​came out in favor of Nutri-Score in 2019.

Today, Lidl Switzerland has rolled out the label for its own brands “Harvest Basket” and “Trattoria Alfredo”, with the intention of extending it to other product lines.

Long term commitment

The latest initiative is part of the retailer’s long-term commitment to healthy eating. This includes signing the “Milan Declaration” and following it with the aim of reducing the sugar content of yoghurts and breakfast cereals.

In the yoghurt segment in particular, Lidl has already made significant progress, reducing added sugars in 42 of the 43 Swiss yoghurts.

At the beginning of 2021, Lidl Switzerland developed a simple labeling system in cooperation with the Swiss Animal Protection PSA for all fresh pork, poultry and beef/veal products.

It now plans to roll out the same labeling system for shell eggs from early 2022.

Lidl Switzerland operates 160 stores, 12 of which will open in 2021, mainly in city centers and major cities.

In September 2021, Dutch retailer Plus launched a new pilot project to introduce the Nutri-Score labeling system to 3,000 private label SKUs.

© 2022 European supermarket magazine. Article by Branislav Pekic. For more private label news, click here. Click on subscribe register for ESM: European Supermarket Magazine.

How Energy Bills Affect Small Businesses

More than sex in ten small businesses say they spend up to a fifth of their total costs on energy consumption, while eight percent spend up to 35 to 50 percent.

And seven in ten businesses believe the cost of their energy bill has an impact on their business growth, a view particularly felt by businesses in the East Midlands.

This was revealed in a survey of 500 businesses by Tyl by NatWest, whose research revealed that SMB owners face several hurdles when it comes to implementing them.

A third admitted they didn’t have enough time – or information – to spend on implementing more sustainable measures. Of those who did, a quarter said they were not financially able to consider other energy-saving efforts.

The government offers various initiatives to help SMEs implement more sustainable practices, such as environmental tax breaks, the feed-in tariff (FIT) scheme and capital allowances for energy efficient equipment. But many small business owners said they were unaware of this support.

Business owners know they can improve the sustainable measures they have in place, but financial concerns and lack of information are holding them back

Among the companies making the most positive progress, the most popular sustainability practices include using LED light bulbs, shutting down production equipment at the end of each workday, and using smart meters to examine energy consumption.

Whether big or small, making such energy-efficient changes can bring tangible benefits to a small business, according to Tyl. Almost a fifth save between £2,000 and £3,000 a year through energy efficiency measures, while a third save between £1,000 and £1,999. At a time when energy costs are rising, SMEs can really benefit from such savings.

CEO Mike Elliff said: “It’s clear that UK SMEs are finding the cost of energy to be a barrier to growing their business. Improving energy efficiency in the workplace may be the most effective way to reduce these costs, while also playing a key role in the UK’s journey to net zero.

“Fifty percent of business owners Tyl spoke to know they can improve the sustainable measures they have in place, but financial issues and lack of information are holding them back. Small businesses need more support and information on ways to save money and implement initiatives.”

Competing Equestrian – SRQist :: SRQ Magazine article by Wes Roberts, Barbie Heit

Like an equestrian triathlon, eventing tests the abilities of horse and rider in three phases: dressage, cross country and show jumping. Guests and spectators at the event were treated to a thrilling experience and a great day in the countryside. TerraNova Equestrian Center, a world-class, multi-disciplinary equestrian competition center located in the scenic countryside of Myakka town, held its inaugural event last October.

Terra nova equestrian centerhas partnered with three local nonprofits that champion their causes: Meals on Wheels PLUS of Manatee, SMART (Sarasota Manatee Association for Riding Therapy), and Southeastern Guide Dogs. Each competitor selected one of three organizations – each charity having around 50 runners. “We have several Olympic riders here this weekend,” says Hannah Herrig Ketelboeter, president of the TerraNova Equestrian Center and organizer herself. “We really hope to involve the community in the sport and educate them so they can follow the runners and be excited to come year after year. We have a lot of international riders with us, and although most are from the United States, we have seven countries represented at this event.

For those unfamiliar with equestrian events, Ketelboeter explains the competition phases. “There are three phases and a lot of people call it the equestrian sports triathlon. The first phase is dressage where judges score based on balance, rhythm and harmony between horse and rider as well as precision of movement. This is therefore the only subjective scoring part of the eventing. The next phase is cross-country where riders navigate more solid objects, ditches and banks, and jump in and out of bodies of water. This phase is time-based. There is an optimal time and if you are below this time, you are good. If you exceed this time, you will get time faults. Then, if you have a jump denial or a jump evade, that also costs you penalties. The final phase of eventing, which most people are familiar with, is show jumping, where riders prove their accuracy by clearing a course of fences.

A dressage and cross-country competitor, Sara Beth Anton has been riding since the age of six. She believes some of the best horses and riders the United States has to offer compete in this premier event. “It really is one of the most amazing things to see horses zipping past you across the country and over fences with speed,” she says. “This is by far one of the nicest facilities I’ve been to and I’ve traveled to many different facilities,” says Claire Anderson, a contestant from Ocala, Florida. When asked what percentage of people she thinks are in this field for financial gain or prize money versus a love of the sport, she added, “I would say a lot of people are doing this job. . by love. They really like these horses.

Nine-year-old Nicole Nair, who has been riding for five years, says she has probably competed in about 100 competitions. Her horse, Jack Run, is sometimes a bit difficult to control, but when he does well in competition, she feels good. Her advice to little girls just starting out: “Try a little pony first, start walking, then go higher.”

Competing Equestrian – SRQist :: SRQ Magazine article by Wes Roberts, Barbie Heit

A weekend of equestrian happiness in Terranova.

Like an equestrian triathlon, eventing tests the abilities of horse and rider in three phases: dressage, cross-country and show jumping. Guests and spectators at the event were treated to a thrilling experience and a great day in the countryside. TerraNova Equestrian Center, a world-class, multi-disciplinary equestrian competition center located in the scenic countryside of Myakka Town, held its inaugural event last October.

Terra nova equestrian centerhas partnered with three local nonprofits that champion their causes: Meals on Wheels PLUS of Manatee, SMART (Sarasota Manatee Association for Riding Therapy), and Southeastern Guide Dogs. Each competitor selected one of three organizations – each charity having around 50 runners. “We have several Olympic riders here this weekend,” says Hannah Herrig Ketelboeter, president of the TerraNova Equestrian Center and organizer herself. “We really hope to involve the community in the sport and educate them so they can follow the runners and be excited to come year after year. We have a lot of international riders with us, and although most are from the United States, we have seven countries represented at this event.

For those unfamiliar with equestrian events, Ketelboeter explains the phases of competition. “There are three phases and a lot of people call it the equestrian sports triathlon. The first phase is dressage where judges score based on balance, rhythm and harmony between horse and rider as well as precision of movement. This is therefore the only subjective scoring part of the eventing. The next phase is cross-country where riders navigate more solid objects, ditches and banks, and jump in and out of water features. This phase is time-based. There is an optimal time and if you are below this time, you are good. If you exceed this time, you will get time faults. Then, if you have a jump denial or a jump evade, that also costs you penalties. The final phase of eventing, which most people are familiar with, is show jumping, where riders prove their accuracy by clearing a course of fences.

A dressage and cross-country competitor, Sara Beth Anton has been riding since the age of six. She believes some of the best horses and riders the United States has to offer compete in this premier event. “It’s really one of the most amazing things to see horses zipping past you cross-country and navigating fences with speed,” she says. “This is by far one of the nicest facilities I’ve been to and I’ve traveled to many different facilities,” says Claire Anderson, a contestant from Ocala, Florida. When asked what percentage of people she thinks are in this field for financial gain or prize money versus a love of the sport, she added, “I would say a lot of people are doing this job. by love. They really like these horses.

Nine-year-old Nicole Nair, who has been riding for five years, says she has probably competed in about 100 competitions. Her horse, Jack Run, can be a bit difficult to control at times, but when he does well in competition, she feels good. Her advice to little girls just starting out: “Try a little pony first, start walking, then climb higher.”

Chicago: Dr. Austin Prabhu’s Konkani Veez e-Weekly World Magazine Completes Five Years

Press release

Chicago, January 22: Dr. Austin Prabhu, a Mangalurean residing in Chicagoland, published his world magazine Veez e-Weekly Konkani in 4 Konkani scripts. It started publishing in February 2018 and it is now reaching its fifth year without failing every week. Veez has gained its popularity worldwide as the readers are spread across almost every country in the world.

These magazines are free everywhere on the Internet and very convenient to read on PC, tablet or mobile phone. No matter where you are or what you’re doing, you can always read as long as internet access is available.

Now, since the beginning of 2022, Dr Austin Prabhu has started publishing a Veez English Weekly for non-Konkani readers. Even though it just finished three weeks after publication, its popularity continues to grow, and readers around the world appreciate the effort. Those who want to read this magazine online, they can just visit issuu.com and get the paper.

It contains articles by famous writers like Bishop Gerald Mathias, Bhopal, Fr Cedric Prakash SJ, Gujarat, Philomena and Gilbert Lawrence, USA, Philip Mudartha, Mumbai, Ivan J Saldanha Shet, Mangaluru, Fr Pratap Naik, SJ, Goa, Harold Dsouza, USA, Recipes by M Jessy Dsouza, Dubai and Benedicta Lobo, Dubai, etc., to name a few. Read Veez Illustrated Weekly online and tell your friends and family about this English magazine published in Chicago. Currently, Dr. Prabhu edits and publishes four Konkani weeklies, one English-language weekly and two monthly electronic magazines for Lions.

Cracking The Lid – Arts & Culture :: SRQ Magazine article by Phil Lederer

The Sarasota Art Museum’s new executive director wants to turn a hidden gem into the crown jewel.

Head to the Sarasota Museum of Art these days and it’s a veritable hive of activity. From the atypical career retrospective on the painter Judith Linhares, to seeing the artist organize a mini-exhibition within her own show in tribute to the artists who inspired and pushed her – to the launch of two new series of exhibitions –On point, showcasing and celebrating a single work of art at a time, and In the making, which dedicates space to emerging artists, Sarasota’s newest museum seems determined to claim its position as a premier art institution in a crowded field. “It’s a jewelry box,” says Virginia Shearer, who joined the Sarasota Art Museum as executive director in early 2021. “And we have to find a way to open it up to everyone.”

THE HISTORIC AND RENOVATED BUILDING OF THE SARASOTA ART MUSEUM LIGHTS UP AT GOLDEN HOUR FOR SHEARER.

RQS: What makes an exhibit suitable for the Sarasota Museum of Art? How to reconcile entertainment and education?

Virginia Sheer: What’s really special about the Sarasota Art Museum is that it’s founded on the premise that contemporary art is changing, evolving from this moment we’re all living in, but it’s also about our collective lived human experience and our collective consciousness. We want to capture that by making sure we always have an exhibit that has a message or theme that resonates for the moment we are in. We are looking for artists with a purpose. They put their passion and their work behind a message they want to convey. And we are interested in bringing those messages to light. But we also always think about the diversity of materials and the diversity of artists. I am also interested in exhibitions where we can bring together several artists. And that didn’t really happen here at the Sarasota Art Museum. I want to go to collective exhibitions on a larger scale.

RQS: How would you describe the current voice of the museum and where do you want it to be?

Shearer: We have created a sort of university-type institution. And scholarship is extremely important and must be the foundation of everything we do. What we need to do is really hold on to our roots, but also look more at the balance of being a community museum. That’s where the game comes in. We have a new perspective, a new voice and we fill a niche here in Sarasota which is what’s new, what’s to come, the pulse of what what contemporary artists think. But we really need to push harder to make our voice more welcoming, playful and, dare I say, even fun.

RQS: Why is play important in a museum?

Shearer: Because people learn while having fun. The best way to learn is when you get lost and waste time, because the pursuit you’re working in is so consuming that you lose track of it. And that’s where you really start to get even more creative and learn even more. We want our experience to be something that helps engage people in that flow. This is where the learning is seamless.

RQS: How to achieve it?

Shearer: We seek to incorporate more participatory experiences. In April, we will inaugurate a large collective exhibition entitled State of the Art 2020: Constructs. And this exhibition will include performance art, video art, installation art, paintings, sculpture. And the idea is whether we can get more work that invites participation and interactivity in the galleries. This will only amplify the experience. People will come out of, “We just have to walk and behave a certain way.”

RQS: star wars Where StarTrek?

Shearer: star wars. Everyday. In fact, I have a t-shirt that says: “The Force is feminine”. My husband has one with Darth Vader that says “I am your father”. One year I gave all the cousins ​​and kids Millennium Falcon crew t-shirts. I’m also obsessed with George Lucas and can’t wait for the museum to open in LA.

SRQ: Is it the shared emphasis on the intersection between education and play?

Shearer: People just learn in different ways. With regard to museums: for auditory learners, there is the visit; for visual learners, there’s everything you can take away from just looking at the art. But you can also read. And for those who love to experience the world intrinsically, you can wander around on your own. For people who are in a group, you can have these social events. The extrinsic learner and the kinesthetic learners, you can join a dance class or do anything. We have to be ready for all because we are all so diverse. And that’s how we’ll design the programs. It’s an element that I’m going to bring to the equation here that wasn’t quite in place.

RQS: How do you imagine the museum of the future?

Shearer: Museums will always, always, always be an important part of our lives. Humans are endlessly fascinating, and what we make is that residue of our lives. And other humans are interested in this residue, in what happened before. And there’s nothing like the real thing. I firmly believe that where the magic happens is between us and the original artwork. Many artists have said it beautifully: a work of art is never complete until the viewer is there before the work of art and makes it whole. And I believe it.

Tech giants grilled on online security | Western magazine

Some of the world’s biggest tech companies were asked about policies and guidelines they believe are aimed at keeping users safe online.

Representatives from Google, TikTok and Meta – the company that owns Facebook and Instagram – were questioned by a parliamentary committee on Thursday over proposed laws that would hold them accountable for online harassment and abuse on their platforms.

The federal government wants to introduce laws to force social media platforms to remove offensive posts and, in certain circumstances, reveal the identities of anonymous posters.

Social media companies have said they have a business interest in keeping Australians safe online because otherwise they will lose users.

Lucinda Longcroft, Google Australia representative, said that when evaluating content, the company’s guidelines take context into account.

“While I may personally find content objectionable, our guidelines are enforced by trained trust and safety employees who review both the nature of the material … and the context,” she said.

Labor MP Tim Watts asked Ms Longcroft about Google’s ‘three strikes’ policy for YouTube, where accounts that post content against the company’s guidelines three times are shut down.

He referred to nine complaints he had made against videos on the United Australia Party’s YouTube channel.

He said six videos were taken down following the complaints, but the account was still active.

Ms Longcroft said that if multiple complaints are filed at the same time, they are combined into one “strike”.

Meanwhile, Meta policy chief Mia Garlick said all reports of Facebook putting profits above the safety of their users are “categorically false”.

“Security is at the heart of our business,” she told the committee.

UAP MP Craig Kelly – who was banned from Facebook in 2021 for posting misleading content about COVID-19 – said the company had “blood on its hands” for blocking treatment information from being published against the virus.

But Ms Garlick said Facebook would take the same action against a user whether or not they were a public figure.

“When it comes to harmful health misinformation (our policies) are enforced at all levels, regardless of who is making the claims,” she said.

Australian Associated Press

Joss Whedon hits back at Ray Fisher’s Justice League accusations

After being called out by a number of former cast members for misconduct on various sets, filmmaker Joss Whedon has resurfaced in a new interview to respond and clarify the accusations. Specifically, he denies claims by actors Ray Fisher and Gal Gadot, made in multiple social posts in 2020 and 2021, about Whedon’s misogynistic and racist actions on the set of Justice League . Anonymous associates say the film’s former director Zack Snyder may be at the heart of Whedon’s troubles, and Snyder fans have become exasperated by tribalism.

“The early internet lifted me up, and the modern internet pulled me down,” Whedon says in the story. “Perfect symmetry does not escape me.”

The cover of the latest issue of New York magazine describes Whedon’s journey from childhood in a “palazzo-style apartment” on the Upper West Side, to British and Wesleyan boarding schools, to writing the original buffy script, taking Web 1.0 by storm buffyThe cast and crew’s are embedded in message boards. But the substance of the article deals with the wide variety of abuse allegations now leveled against Whedon.

These allegations cover just about every TV show Whedon has been involved in – Buffy, Angel, Firefly, Dollhouse, and Agents of SHIELD, which Joss co-created with his stepbrother and his stepbrother’s wife. In some cases, Whedon allegedly abused power dynamics to start dating women on these shows. In others, he humiliated female writers and got physical by grabbing a number of women by the arms. An anonymous writer on Firefly recalls in New York history a time when Whedon called a staff meeting for an impromptu conference to poke fun at an employee’s script. “I’ve had my share of shitty showrunners, but intent to hurt – that’s what sets me apart now.” Whedon admits wrongful behavior, mostly attributed to being a youth in a position of power, and denies others.

Interestingly, anonymous members of Whedon’s inner circle have an origin story for where these allegations begin: the set of Justice League.

The Justice League cast at Comic-Con 2017. Fisher, leftmost, wears a shirt that’s supposed to read “I Heart Zack Sndyer.”
Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images

Perhaps no movie of the 2010s was as tormented as Justice League, a film called into question insofar as a new montage was released last year. Common history has it that Whedon was chosen to direct after the tragic death of Zack Snyder’s daughter by suicide, although Whedon opposes the account. According to the filmmaker, Warner Bros. hired him to take over when an early showing caused executives to lose faith in Snyder’s cut. “They asked me to fix it, and I thought I could help,” Whedon says. The profile describes his gun gig as “one of the biggest regrets of his life.”

Where did things go wrong, according to Whedon? All over. Warner asked him to deliver 40 Days of Reshoots, and it became clear to him that Snyder was directing sets very differently. Snyder encouraged his actors to improvise through their scenes and asked for their input. Whedon, who had made a name for himself as a writer, wanted them to read his words exactly as he wrote them.

“It didn’t go well at all,” recalled an unnamed crew member.

This fundamental difference in approach seems to have colored Whedon’s every interaction with the actors of Justice League. For Ray Fisher, who played Cyborg — notably, the first black superhero in a DC movie — the differences got personal. Snyder had enlisted Fisher’s help in creating Cyborg, as New York Magazine writer Lila Shapiro describes Fisher as a “writing partner” of Snyder and screenwriter Chris Terrio.

“With a white writer and a white director, we both felt that the perspective of an actor of color was really important,” Terrio said. The Hollywood Reporter in 2021.

Much of Fisher’s perspective was a tragic backstory for Cyborg involving his parents, “two genius black people,” Fisher told The Hollywood Reporter. According to the actor, when Whedon took the director’s chair, those scenes were cut. On a conference call, Fisher says he mourned the loss but was ready to move on, but Whedon reportedly cut him off. “I feel like I’m taking notes right now,” Fisher claims, Whedon said, “and I don’t like taking notes from anyone, not even Robert Downey Jr.”

Fisher isn’t the only actor to have spoken out about Whedon’s treatment on set, with Gal Gadot also accusing the director of threatening his career. But Fisher’s numerous accusations, which include being forced to recite slogans and use color correction to alter his skin tone, clearly stayed with Whedon.

Whedon says the color correction Fisher suggests he used to lighten his skin color was applied to the entire film, where everything was made brighter in post-production. Cyborg’s cut script “logically didn’t make sense,” Whedon says now, and Fisher’s character was terribly tested on audiences. The two talked a lot about the characters, actually, and were friendly. In Whedon’s world, the problem lies with Fisher’s feature in the film. “We’re talking about a malevolent force,” he says in New York. “We’re talking about a bad actor both ways.”

The New York Magazine article cites a number of unnamed Whedon allies, who “proposed a theory: What if Fisher had done Snyder’s auction? Without providing evidence, they speculated that Snyder had tricked Fisher into believing that Whedon was a racist. According to this theory, which Whedon refuses to endorse or denounce, Snyder’s manipulation of Fisher “poisoned [Charisma Carpenter of Buffy] against Whedon, making him see the complicated history of their relationship as a simplistic tale of abuse.

There is no evidence of a conspiracy between Snyder and Fisher, nor any evidence that Charisma Carpenter doesn’t understand her own relationship with Whedon. Whedon sticks to his own legacy at the end of the story. “I think I’m one of the nicest showrunners that’s ever been,” he says.

Fisher, who reportedly turned down multiple requests from New York Magazine to speak for the story, responded to the profile with a Tweeter saying he “looks like Joss Whedon to lead an endgame after all…”, while refusing to address “all the lies and antics”, preferring instead to celebrate the work of Martin Luther King on his birthday. birthday.

Boots sorry for magazine article suggesting ‘misleading’ things about transgender people

Boots sorry for a magazine article suggesting that transgender people are more likely to commit suicide if they are not addressed with their “preferred” personal pronouns

  • Boots apologized for ‘misleading suggestions’ regarding transgender people
  • In his magazine, James Barr wrote about addressing with preferred pronouns
  • He claimed trans people are less likely to try to end their lives if people around them use the right pronouns










Boots has apologized for posting “misleading suggestions” that people who identify as transgender are more likely to attempt suicide if not addressed using their “preferred” personal pronouns.

In a recent edition of the retailer’s Health & Beauty magazine, LGBTQ+ podcaster James Barr wrote, “Not everyone identifies as ‘he’ or ‘she’.

‘Some people…might prefer “they/them” pronouns.’

Boots has apologized for posting ‘misleading suggestions’ about people who identify as transgender (file photo used)

James Barr wrote that

James Barr wrote that ‘trans and non-binary people were 50% less likely to try to end their lives when those around them used their correct pronouns’ (file photo)

He added: “A recent study found that trans and [gender] non-binary people were 50% less likely to try to end their lives when those around them used their correct pronouns.

Boots said: “We apologize for any misleading suggestions following this article.”

Stephanie Davies-Arai, from watchdog group Transgender Trend, said: “Lobbying organizations have been getting the message out… that a child who is not affirmed as being of the opposite sex is more likely to attempt suicide, based on no evidence.”

The Trevor Project in the United States, which conducted the investigation, stood by its findings.

4 Steps to (Realistically) Starting a Small Business Online

Starting an online business is easy when you know the right steps. We spoke to experts to learn how to start an online business from scratch and how to build a solid foundation for business success.

You will learn what is needed if you are wondering how to start a small business online. Let’s start with the crucial steps.

Explore the business idea

Sometimes, even if you think you have the best business idea, your product or service may not be the right fit for the market. In most situations, business ideas are worthless, and that is why you need to consider many factors before starting a business.

You need to explore the market, interview potential customers about the possible product, and research the usefulness of the product in the market. By doing this kind of preparation, you are building a strong foundation for the product or service you want to offer people.

You should develop a website for your small business online to reap better results.

Make a business plan

Once you are sure that your product or service will have a good positioning in the market, you need to develop a business plan. In a good and effective business plan, you need to decide on the business structure, the number of workers and the financial support you need to find while setting up the online business.

Your business plan must contain all the elements of the business plan related to physical activity. In the case of online business, you should focus more on the online market and the online distribution of the product or service.

Decide on the company name and business structure

As for the business name of your online business, you can choose the name available in your state. Make sure the name is also available as a domain name and that you can find a .com ending in your domain name.

When building an online business, you also need to think about the business structure. There are many variations of the business structure that you can choose from.

You can decide to start a small business online as a sole proprietorship, partnership, limited liability company or corporation. Each of these business forms has its advantages and you should learn more about the business structure models available to you. Chances are you can find the right business structure when you define your business plan and see what type of organization would be most important for the success of the business.

Build the website

You need to create a website for your online business, and this step is very important for anyone who is wondering how to start a small business online. Building a website is just as important as building a store in the physical sense, and that’s why your website should speak about your business in the best way.

Make sure you choose the right hosting and choose the website builder provider. Today, there are many options for creating quality websites.

You can decide to go with service providers such as Wix or Shopify, or you can create your own website in WordPress. Whichever option you choose, make sure the website is of high quality as it is the first impression of your online business.

You can ask a question: “How do I start my own online business? » Now you know the answers. You need to follow the mentioned steps and create an online business that will stand out from the rest. On many occasions, you can find a similar product or service, but your business must offer something unique that will motivate the public to use your invention.

Joy In The Journey – CARGO :: SRQ Magazine article by Brittany Mattie

The Petrone family finds joy in the in-between, transforming an outdated duplex on Holmes Beach into a colorful boutique inn.

WELCOME TO HOSTEL JOY. PHOTOGRAPHY BY ARIELLE VEY (@ariellevey)

Worthy of having their own HGTV show – Ashley and Dino Petrone delve into just about anything to do with design, build, repurpose and DIY. Their latest home project, “Chateau Petrone,” was a French-style family home in California that they renovated while documenting the progress on social media, catapulting Ashley’s blog and Instagram (@arrowsandbow), which counts now over 667,000 subscribers.

JOIE INN, 3501 GULF DR., HOLMES BEACH, 34217, [email protected], JOIEINN.COM, @JOIEINN

But before we even got there, the Petrone family of five purged just about everything they owned, including their 3,400 square meters. 180 square foot house in the mountains and everything in it – to move into a 180 sq. RV trailer ft on part of their land. After buying the land, Ashley and Dino had high hopes of building their “dream house” there. “But after 17 months of living more simply in a caravan, with less stuff, lots of dirty work and no house building, I adopted the motto ‘find joy in the in-between'”, shares Ashley. “It felt like I had lived my life trying to move on to the next best thing to find joy. I realized that I could intentionally find it in everyday life, even crushed in a trailer with my husband and my three children on a pile of dirt heap.

Blush unit exterior and patio

BLUSH UNIT EXTERIOR AND PATIO

With another baby on the way and a maligned interest in hunting big real estate lots to build homes full of stuff, Ashley and Dino took their new minimal mindset and set their sights on a destination further south – a little slice of sunny paradise known as Anna Maria Island. Upon arriving in the Sunshine State, the Petrones found and purchased a dated gray duplex on Gulf Drive that was in desperate need of a makeover and renovation by a design-savvy young couple. And “Joie” (“joy” in French) was that perfect spin to bring some extra joy to their California chapter name. Months of jaw-dropping before-and-afters shared on Ashley and Dino’s Instagrams, as well as @joieinn’s, have captured the attention of thousands of paradise-seeking travelers and aesthetic-hungry designers across the country. .

Sleek color schemes and coastal bohemian decor reign throughout Joie Inn's four themed units.

ELEGANT COLOR SCHEMES AND COASTAL-BOHO DECOR RULES IN JOY INN’S FOUR THEMED UNITS.

With the help of Coastline Contractors renovation, plus a little hands-on work and personal touches from family members, including hand-painted rainbow murals and solar stencil designs inside exterior, Joie Inn has gone from an outdated repairman to a happy color. , bohemian bungalow that feels like a mix between a boutique hotel and a welcoming Airbnb. Local photographer Arielle Vey (@ariellevey) captured images of AMI for Ashley to incorporate as artwork on the Frame TV, which doubles as a high-quality picture frame.

Sage kitchen and dining room

SAGE KITCHEN AND DINING ROOM

Upon arrival, guests receive locally made cookies, a personalized tote bag, a Joie Inn koozie, a keychain, and a comprehensive travel guide compiled by the Petrones and filled with their favorite local getaways. In addition to on-the-go amenities, each room is equipped for a day out on Holmes Beach just across the street, including beach carts, chairs, sand toys, an umbrella, a sound machine and, of course, sure, a Dyson vacuum to clean up all that salty back sand.

Blush bathroom tile

BLUSH BATHROOM TILES

Categorized into color tones—Terra-cotta; Sage; To blush; and Sun Room – each unit fleshes out the nuances of intentional design choices to embody its designated color theme. “I thought it would be fun to have themed rooms, but in an updated and fresh way,” Ashley says. “Make people excited to book a certain colorful room, but just as excited to try another one the next time they stay.” So I decided to give each of the four units its own color to highlight the sunsets and seashells that fill the beaches here and build from one of my favorite linen bedding brands. The darling duvets in the bedroom set the tone in each of the units, while the painted shower tiles in the bathrooms and the backsplashes in the kitchens perfectly match the respective color landscape of each haven.

Sun Room Bedroom and Duvet

SUN ROOM BEDROOM AND DUVET

Stepping out to soak up the early morning sun, guests are greeted with a Palm Springs-inspired pool and patios surrounded by lush palm trees to a shaded outdoor cafe and bar. Undoubtedly, the hardest part of your day will be deciding whether to lay back in the woven cotton hammock surrounded by tropical greenery with a cocktail served in coconut, or temporarily leave your bungalow sanctuary to use the Blue Jay electric bikes and scooters. (available to Joie Inn guests) to navigate and explore AMI.

Terracotta room wall cupboard

THE WALL CUPBOARD IN THE TERRACOTTA BEDROOM

“When you look around, you can’t help but feel Anna Maria’s cool, laid-back old Florida vibes,” Ashley shares. “We come here to relax and fill up with a bit of joy.”

Tropical palm trees and Palm Springs vibes are alive around Joy's Pool Escape for guests.

TROPIC PALMS AND PALM SPRINGS VIBES ARE ALIVE AROUND THE POOL ESCAPE OF JOY FOR GUESTS.

US weekly mortgage rates jump significantly

The 30-year fixed rate mortgage (FRM) averaged 3.45% for the week of Jan. 13, down from 3.22% last week, according to Freddie Mac’s Weekly Primary Mortgage Market Survey. A year ago at the same date, the 30-year FRM averaged 2.79%.

“Mortgage rates have risen across all types of mortgages, with the 30-year fixed rate mortgage up nearly a quarter of a percent from last week,” said Sam Khater, chief economist by Freddie Mac. “This was driven by the prospect of faster than expected monetary policy tightening in response to continued inflation exacerbated by uncertainty in labor and supply chains. The rise in mortgage rates so far this year has yet to affect buying demand, but given the rapid pace of home price growth, it will likely dampen demand in the near future.

The 15-year fixed rate mortgage averaged 2.62% with an average of 0.7 points, up from last week when it averaged 2.43%. A year ago at this time, the 15-year FRM averaged 2.23%.

The 5-year Treasury-linked hybrid variable rate (ARM) mortgage averaged 2.57% averaging 0.3 points, up from last week when it averaged 0.3 points. 2.41%. A year ago at this time, the 5-year ARM averaged 3.12%.

“The impact of rising mortgage rates on the housing market is complex. Those currently looking for a home will need to reassess their finances to ensure they can still afford the price they are looking for,” says Ali Wolf , chief economist at Zonda. “As rising mortgage rates impact the monthly payment, some buyers will need to alter their price research to reflect the change. Buyers on the close will find rising interest rates the jolt of energy that they needed to start buying in earnest today.That little push could make the housing market more competitive in the near term as more buyers try to compete for limited inventory.Longer term, rising rates interest rate will weigh heavily on cost-conscious buyers, impacting affordability and reducing the chances of some becoming homeowners.”

Get off to de-stress – SRQist :: Article from SRQ magazine by Brittany Mattie

Horseback riding is like chicken soup for the soul.

Equestrian rider and long-time lawyer, JAYMIE KLAUBER RESOLVES ALL STRESS BY SPENDING TIME IN THE EAST WITH HER THERAPEUTIC PURE BLOOD.

Beyond the pet-owner relationship that many of us have lovingly experienced, some pets go even further. In therapeutic settings, they often help individuals overcome mental health issues, recover from difficult times or emotional harm. Growing in popularity due to its experiential, holistic approach and evidence-based efficacy, “horse-assisted therapy” and “horse-facilitated psychotherapy” are at the top of Google searches as neoteric terms. for those looking for a helping hoof. Longtime recreational rider Jaymie Klauber says riding the trails for her is “chicken soup for the soul.” Whether it’s a peaceful, solo getaway to unwind life’s stressors, or a fun activity to get together with friends and hubby Tommy Klauber with a picnic of cooked meals. home for an afternoon outing, Jaymie says a look in a horse’s eye and, “You’re hooked.

PHOTOGRAPH BY WYATT KOSTYGAN

“Something about their eyes, it’s like they can see straight into your soul. There is such a special bond and partnership between horses and humans. So much confidence is involved in riding, partly in you and the horse. So I guess that’s what makes it easy for a person to connect with them compared to another animal. ”

Contact Jaymie at epicequineexperiences.com or 941-705-3884 to arrange a race.

CONTACT JAYMIE AT EPICEQUINEEXPERIENCES.COM OR 941-705-3884 TO ORGANIZE A TRIP.

When the Klaubers decided to shut down their restaurant and catering business, Jaymie wondered what would bring her most joy in her next chapter, and the answer stared at her in the form of a majestic pure- blood brown color. “I wanted to be around horses as much as possible, to spend more time with them, so I decided to create Epic Equine Experiences to teach others about the incredible and healing possibilities of horses.”

And sometimes the healing goes both ways. Calm, sensitive and full of endurance, Jaymie’s eight rescued horses of various breeds are mostly former racehorses or retired thoroughbreds from the racing world. Adopted and adopted for other equestrian pursuits, Jaymie gives them a second chance at life and a new “off-piste” goal. Between their protruding stature and free spirits, “there’s a feeling of being around horses that is just plain good for your mind and soul,” says Jaymie. “Everything you do on horseback is also good for your body. On the one hand, you need to be in shape, or riding will get you in shape quickly. The old joke is, “What’s the problem? The horse does all the work. But that’s not true! She laughs. Using just about every muscle in your body, your arms to lead and control, the core tightens for balance and keeps you upright, while your legs are like an alligator clip against their sides for added stability during movement.

But beyond the physical form of riding, the emotional healing and mental release involved with horses is what keeps Jaymie’s riders from leaving Epic Equine Experiences. In particular, a woman diagnosed with cancer and currently undergoing chemo. “She’s planning different days to get off here from St. Pete. She comes in between her chemotherapy treatments on days when she knows she will feel good, ”Jaymie shares. “She used to cycle a long time ago, but she got back to it while going through this cancer, as part of her recovery. It brings him so much joy and release. With their calming effect on the brain and their ability to lift spirits and elicit smiles, “people get quite addicted to horses,” she continues. “I see people going out into the stable and you can just see the pressure of their day ease as soon as they touch a horse, it’s wonderful to see. There is a lot of smile involved.

Photo courtesy of @epicequineexp

PHOTO COURTESY OF @EPICEQUINEEXP

Epic Equine Experiences offers riding experiences through county and state parks near the city and I-75. On well-groomed trails and explored “off-road” scenic areas, cyclists will be immersed in ecological wonders, native flora and Spanish moss, Florida wetlands and swamps, hundreds of bird species exotic, wild animals and tranquil meadows. Homemade meals and decadent drinks are provided to riders by the Klaubers – a nod to their ancient careers in gastronomy and a bonus for riders who wish to picnic outdoors in the oak forests.

Anchored Flow – SRQist :: SRQ magazine article by Brittany Mattie

Swap your trusty yoga mat for a floating BOGA board.

SUP YOGA SRQ FOUNDER AND INSTRUCTOR, STEPHANIE OUELLETE, TAKEN BY WYATT KOSTYGAN.

Canadian yoga instructor Stephanie Ouellette recently flew south from Ottawa, Ontario, where his stand-up paddleboard (SUP) business, Suptopia Floating Yoga, operated seasonally, primarily in the beautiful lakeside town of Muskoka. Ouellette has also led ecotherapy Vinyasas at various yoga and music festivals in Canada, and has traveled the world living and working on the water in countries as far afield as Australia, Japan, China, Malaysia, Germany, Singapore and India, as well as various cities in the United States

WEEKLY LESSONS GENERALLY START FROM THE SKI-A-REES SITE (LAST THE MOTE MARINE LAB) OR OVERLOOK THE POINT AT LBK.

Now that she’s finding her groove in Florida, SUP Yoga SRQ has emerged. After launching (no pun intended) in June last year, Ouellette teaches private and group classes three days a week where she provides water yogis with BOGA stand-up paddle boards – designed specifically as floating fitness mats. aquatic to support movement on the water – as well as paddles, dry bags and anchors in order to moor your boat to the bottom of the sea and keep the group together in a safe place. Ouellette’s classes are lower and slower than a studio class because each pose is a balance pose on the SUP. But, by combining the movement and intention of yoga with views of Sarasota Bay in all directions, yogis can channel their three warriors by challenging their lower body, engaging their core, balancing their mind and controlling their breathing.

Ouellete leads a sunset sun salutation off Longboat Key on BOGA paddleboards.

OUELLETE LEADS A SUN GREETING AT SUNSET ON THE SHORES OF LONGBOAT KEY ON BOGA PADDLEBOARDS.

“When you train on the water, all of the swings require all of our stabilizing muscles to be activated, muscles that you didn’t even know you had, and your focus has to be there,” she explains. “This heightened mindfulness really helps us connect to the ‘here and now’.” To start finding your center at sea legs, slow everything down. “Tune your body to the waves and the wind, increase your receptivity when the board is whispering to you that you need to move slightly left or right,” says Ouellette. “And wait to look at the horizon from Downdog – seeing the movement of water under you and around you, and everything upside down – talk about a change in perspective.”

Find up-to-date class schedules or book a private session at supyogasrq.com or @supyogasrq

FIND UP-TO-DATE CLASS SCHEDULE OR BOOK A PRIVATE SESSION ON SUPYOGASRQ.COM OR @SUYPYOGASRQ

So yes, to avoid falling into it, think about micro-movements for fluid transitions and focus your gaze on a fixed point. But, in all honesty, falling seems to be part of the fun. Embrace the humbling aspect of being in nature’s playground and let the salt water heal all literal or figurative wounds. “I wholeheartedly believe that combining yoga and SUP magically brings all the benefits together,” she says. “When I’m on the water, I feel connected and part of nature. Events and circumstances that might have irritated me that day disappear – it’s almost as if my problems remain ashore when I paddle and it’s just me, my breath and my board.

So whether it’s mastering a balance on one foot in Eagle’s Pose or gently stretching the spine in Child’s Pose, being able to counter and react to the unpredictable flow of the The water below is a rewarding feat, culminating in a pleasant floating sensation that feels like a “mini-vacation for the nervous system.”

Anchor away and namaste.